Dpaint's Drawing from Life Survival Guide - Page 2
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 31 to 50 of 50

Thread: Dpaint's Drawing from Life Survival Guide

  1. #31
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    [QUOTE=ajvenema;2592186]
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post

    In my country theres no problem with that whatsoever, so thats why i'm suprised. sorry that i stepped on your patriotic heart
    You didn't...but I think you owe Tea the apology.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    696
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 93 Times in 88 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I dont think so. theres no reason why she should be offended or something. All i said was that im surprised you have to think about this kind of stuff when you go out sketching in the usa. its getting a bit off topic now i guess.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    717
    Thanks
    932
    Thanked 291 Times in 208 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by ajvenema View Post
    I dont think so. theres no reason why she should be offended or something. All i said was that im surprised you have to think about this kind of stuff when you go out sketching in the usa. its getting a bit off topic now i guess.
    I think the sweeping comment about Americans got in the way of what you were trying to say.

    Anyway, thanks dpaint. Some great advice. I've done that ninja technique before. Here's hoping I'll never have to put my bear evading skills to use.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus
    Posts
    337
    Thanks
    156
    Thanked 97 Times in 70 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    As a female trying to draw outdoors in Aus - sometimes the withering look doesn't work as unfortunately some men seem to think that any kind of eye contact is an invitation.

    Usually the best trick for fending off unwanted advances is the polite 'smile and nod' (to not be outwardly aggressive as this can also lead to trouble) while giving clear signs that you don't want company eg one syllable answers and turning your head and body language away from the rude b*stard.

    Kitty's Drawings - My blog!

    I have a Sketchbook now ---> SKETCHY!!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    102
    Thanks
    62
    Thanked 23 Times in 16 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by ajvenema View Post
    geez,
    i start to think americans are REALLY idiots..
    in europe you can just draw on the street, and nothing will happen. maybe once an hour someone will take a look, and twice a day someone actually says something. and at least nobody is rude. its just getting over being afraid to be there looking at the people, but after that, theres really no problem.
    I missed this completely
    Indeed, your comment about Americans was a bit too much. But if I tried to draw somewhere in New York, Chicago or even Austin, I wouldn't have had this problem. You can't really compare Europe to most of US cities because Europe is so much more crowded. Over here the density of population (and the number of attractive girls with sketchpads) is a lot lower, so no wonder some people see that as a chance to acquaint the female artist. So this is a simple matter of demographics.


    And thanks Jeff


    Kittymeow, a smile would still be a bad idea..

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,526
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thumbs up

    Ok, back to the topic.

    Does DPaint, Jeff or any other experts here have tips on how to hold the pencil when drawing on an easel?

    I'm trying to get comfortable with the easel by drawing on nothing except the easel from now on, and these 2 days, my hands are shavy and it's like the pencil is gonna fly out from my hand anytime.

    I'm using the extended tripod grip most of the time (holding the pencil like when you're writing, but holding it all the way at the butt area for loose big movement).
    Then I slightly tilt my hand to the right a bit to draw (like a partial underhand grip).

    The overhand grip doesn't work for me (I hate drawing using the side of the pencil).

    As for distance from easel, I currently stand about 1 feet away.

    Do you guys have like, any useful efficient exercises that can help me to get comfortable at the easel faster (other than "draw")?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #37
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hey Xeon - another thing I forgot to mention! When drawing from the shoulder the best pencil grip is the "backhand" grip - just pick up your media with your fingertips from the table or wherever and that is really the proper way to hold it - again takes getting used to. You don't always need to draw with the side - and you can reverse your hand so the back is to the paper as well for some marks. The whole point is this gives you the most flexibility in movement and ability to make marks. Believe it or not people drop their charcoal, paintbrush, pencil all the time - because they're often holding their implement with such delicacy. I've dropped paintbrushes so many times - and usually they go flipping all over the place and it is very funny - generally while doing a demo!

    You might be standing a bit too close - you want to stand about a comfortable arm's distance away from your drawing surface.

    The other reason to adapt to this "grip" is it is the only real way to use some of the other drawing media like vine charcoal or conte. Hang in there!

    Last edited by JeffX99; January 12th, 2010 at 08:54 PM. Reason: Forgot something...
    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  9. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,526
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Hey Xeon - another thing I forgot to mention! When drawing from the shoulder the best pencil grip is the "backhand" grip - just pick up your media with your fingertips from the table or wherever and that is really the proper way to hold it - again takes getting used to. You don't always need to draw with the side - and you can reverse your hand so the back is to the paper as well for some marks. The whole point is this gives you the most flexibility in movement and ability to make marks. Believe it or not people drop their charcoal, paintbrush, pencil all the time - because they're often holding their implement with such delicacy. I've dropped paintbrushes so many times - and usually they go flipping all over the place and it is very funny - generally while doing a demo!

    You might be standing a bit too close - you want to stand about a comfortable arm's distance away from your drawing surface.

    The other reason to adapt to this "grip" is it is the only real way to use some of the other drawing media like vine charcoal or conte. Hang in there!
    Thanks Jeff! I'll try it tonight and probably post some pics o my grip as well.

    I also tried sitting down at a chair and drawing at the easel last night and it was a lot more comfortable cos' you can kinda rest your hand on the bottom of the easel's desk (the lower lip) for support.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #39
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,649
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 5,881 Times in 2,355 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you stand, think of yourself as fencing, holding a sword. Seriously, it will save your shoulder to turn your body sideways when you raise your arm to draw. When your not drawing drop your arm to your side.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  12. #40
    p sage's Avatar
    p sage is offline in pursuit of hot lines Level 14 Gladiator: Dimacheri
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,463
    Thanks
    3,896
    Thanked 1,666 Times in 1,468 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good thread guys.

    Something else I've found particularly useful for #1 is a technique that kills two birds with one stone.

    Squint. It looks like you're fallilng asleep; but you're assessing values, and it also looks like you're not paying attention to your subject.

    I've had people stop staring back at me when I squint.

    Thinking connects desire with creation.
    How good are you?

    The Road to Perdition
    clog
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to p sage For This Useful Post:


  14. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    737
    Thanks
    477
    Thanked 497 Times in 270 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I want to start off by saying this is awesome. I vote sticky!

    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post

    5 Draw in Groups.
    If you can find a group of likeminded artists, it is allot more fun to draw in a crowd. This isolates you and people are more reluctant to disturb a group allowing you to focus and actually get some drawing done. Also in groups you can just draw the people you are with since you will all be holding the pose for roughly the same amount of time.
    It's fun to share sketches with each other too.

    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    7 Be Prepared
    There is nothing worse than getting to your favorite drawing spot and realizing you left your sketchbook at home two hours away. Organize a setup that will allow you to carry everything you need in some sort of satchel or backpack all at once. Have extra pens pencils erasers and sketchpads. Before you leave check it to make sure you have everything you need. When you get home replenish your supplies so the next time you go out everything will be there for you to create your masterpiece.
    Just a warning - there is such a thing as OVER-preparing. Make sure you pack weight appropriate for how much walking is planned. (I.E., if going to a zoo, there will be walking. Who wants to carry 20lbs of materials? Figure out what you ACTUALLY are going to use.)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,138
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 393 Times in 268 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Drawing and painting from life can be dangerous it is no joke. I have been chased by a bear, had full beer bottles thrown at me from a moving car and had people try to run me over just messing around. But nothing beats getting the questions

    1 Are you familiar with Bob Ross?

    2 How long does that take you?

    3 Do you make your living doing that?

    4 My Aunt was an Artist do you know her?

    5 Do you sell those?

    6 How much do you get paid for that?
    Let me add:
    7 If I remain standing here <somewhere blocking my subject>, will you include me?

    8 My neighbour does that too, but he can do it really well

    9 <blank look>

    10 WHICH ONE IS ME? <with a bewildered look at a page full of quick warming up gestures>

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    México
    Posts
    164
    Thanks
    45
    Thanked 25 Times in 24 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Pretty good thread here! I'm somewhat new to drawing from life, or at least to get out and draw people. I use to be very shy, but realizing that being shy is of no use I've been able to overcome it.

    I'll make sure to take out some sunglasses, and that idea about squinting is sooo good! Haha, never would have thought of it myself.

    Thanks dpaint for the bunch of tips.

    Nada importa morir, pero no vivir es horrible.
    ----

    I have a S.KETCH.BOOK.!!

    and a blog (with animation stuff): http://animatedskycat.blogspot.mx/

    and a tumblr (with random stuff): http://arturoarias.tumblr.com/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #44
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,540
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 272 Times in 200 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Téa_Passer View Post
    Had anyone try sketch people at the gym? You can get some great pose reference there.
    I suspect that would weird at least some people out. Privacy expectations in a gym are a bit different than on the street or in a coffee shop.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    canada
    Posts
    104
    Thanks
    25
    Thanked 24 Times in 19 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've met surprisingly low amounts of hostility during my public drawing sessions. Perhaps I haven't been doing it long enough but I do find being social and friendly usually helps. Most people tend to keep to themselves when they figure out they are being drawn. Most will smile, fidget, stare back or get up and leave. What else can you do other than draw fast? I'm more often approached by people walking by than the subject I am drawing. I usually keep my answers short and sweet but I do try and be friendly about it.


    sketchblog
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    965
    Thanks
    651
    Thanked 478 Times in 314 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Great thread dpaint, thank you for the tips.
    It is most encouraging to see that drawing in public is a problem for many people.

    I guess your bear story beats my story: ducks approaching me and stealing my brushes.

    Slowly I am approaching the outside drawing and what I found a great place to sneak at is in cafes such as Costa, Pret-a-manger, or McDonalds (even bhs) that have single seats facing outside. Most people don't look at those seats because it is awkward to watch people eating. I personally think buying a coffee is worth the spot..

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Sheffield, UK
    Posts
    2,187
    Thanks
    4,145
    Thanked 2,206 Times in 882 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ditto on the 'sticky this thread' request.

    Great advice, I've been trying to pluck up to the courage to go to the pub at the train station after work sometimes, there are always interesting people there. What's put me off though is being female and in a pub on your own is usually a signal for some guy to come and try and chat you up. I'll try some of these techniques though like the MP3 player obviously on display and scowling unwelcomingly/squinting and see if they work.

    Oh btw, this thread reminded me of a photo Jason Seiler put up on Facebook. He saw this woman in a diner when he was sketching and took a sneaky photo on his phone, said she had an interesting face for caricature...then she caught him but it did make me think about the etiquette for taking photos of people in public without their consent, I would find it a bit rude if someone took one of me but if it's for reference purposes and the person explained I would be ok with it. I don't know, what's everybody elses opinion on taking photos if you can't finish the sketch in time, or is that defeating the purpose?

    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. The Following User Says Thank You to Angel Intheuk For This Useful Post:


  22. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,116
    Thanks
    111
    Thanked 690 Times in 417 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Flashback View Post
    I once got laughed at for trying to draw from life.
    Everybody's biggest fear. :-)

    I work at an after-school care centre, and during the past school holidays, when there were only a relatively small number of kids, I got to make some quick portrait sketches of some of them. It's a good exercise to get used to having an audience look over your shoulder, making brutally honest comments.

    I had to laugh too, partly at myself. When I finished a sketch I showed it to the subject, a boy of about nine or ten. It was mostly just a line drawing, but with some tentative shading across the forehead in the form of rapid hatching with the ballpoint pen with which I had done the sketch.

    His comment: "It's quite good, sir. Except that bit..." He pointed to the hatching. "I don't have those scratches on my face."

    Well, touché. :-)

    Last edited by blogmatix; April 13th, 2012 at 01:11 PM.
    ____________________________________________
    My sketchbook thread:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...ight=blogmatix
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to blogmatix For This Useful Post:


  24. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,526
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Angel Intheuk View Post
    I would find it a bit rude if someone took one of me but if it's for reference purposes and the person explained I would be ok with it. I don't know, what's everybody elses opinion on taking photos if you can't finish the sketch in time, or is that defeating the purpose?
    When Google's new age spectacles comes out, shooting pics of people on the sly will no longer be an issue and you won't be caught.
    Check this out: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/...83400720120405

    The age of privacy is over. Sadly.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. The Following User Says Thank You to Xeon_OND For This Useful Post:


  26. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Bucharest, Romania
    Posts
    119
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 28 Times in 27 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    ooooh very, very useful pointers!
    i'll prepare some materials and get going once October rolls around, and thus more opportunities appear for me to do so~

    i see why some would be worried, but you just need a touch of i-don't-give-a-fuck and callousness, and you're solved. ninja skills also come in handy. i can blend into a place and go unobserved if i want to like it's my job, for some reason.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Members who have read this thread: 99

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •