Water Miscible Oils
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    Water Miscible Oils

    Has anyone tried any of the water Miscible oil paints? I have a bunch and I thought they would be no different from oils, but they seem a bit stiff. Does anyone notice a difference when they handle them vs regular oil paints?

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    I've never used them myself, but I've heard from people who have that they tend to leave a kind of gross, mucky residue/sheen, something slightly opaque in paints that shouldn't be. That might have been brand-specific though, I'm not sure...

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    They are awful.

    I like to think I'm fairly good with oils, and when a student came to me for help with her water miscible oils, even I couldn't get them to do a thing.
    A gooey mess ensued, and every stroke tore up the last one rather than blend with it.
    They have all the flaws oils and none of the benefits.

    - Dan Dos Santos
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSillustration View Post
    I like to think I'm fairly good with oils...
    This may potentially qualify as understatement of the year...

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    Quote Originally Posted by DSillustration View Post
    They are awful.

    I like to think I'm fairly good with oils, and when a student came to me for help with her water miscible oils, even I couldn't get them to do a thing.
    A gooey mess ensued, and every stroke tore up the last one rather than blend with it.
    They have all the flaws oils and none of the benefits.
    I think my teacher had the same reaction when I made a switch once, he said go back to the regular.

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    There are several brands of them and each are made differently. The only one I've found to be consistent in handling quality is Holbein's Aqua Duos. All the others were unpredictable. I consider myself to be fairly good with oils also, and have been able to use some of them without any problems. I can say the same thing about some brands of regular oils also.

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    Marketing over substance, a solution in search of a problem. If for some reason you absolutely don't want to use solvents, it's perfectly possible to do so with regular oil paints.


    Tristan Elwell
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    they are a that stiffer but I find em very ok to work with. I can't stand the smell of the stuff you need to clean your Oil brush with (that and I prefer using water, its non toxic and it doesn't smell )

    so I pretty much had no choice :/
    if you don't like em but have no reason to really switch I'd just stick with oils if I were you.

    time to get drilled.

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...02#post1551002

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpaceRogue View Post
    I can't stand the smell of the stuff you need to clean your Oil brush with (that and I prefer using water, its non toxic and it doesn't smell )

    so I pretty much had no choice :/
    Not true, see above.


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    Students at the school I used to work had to use this stuff -- I fiddled with it once and found it worse than acrylics with too much drying retarder added. A few of the kids got a handle on it, since it was really their only exposure to painting materials at that point, I understand how that can happen, but, if you can use real oils, use them.

    The colour is far superior and there are decidedly healthier options to work with than traditional mediums and thinners.

    ~R

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Not true, see above.
    the only thing we have here is the 'non smelling but still toxic' stuff, it 1 step in the right direction tho

    time to get drilled.

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...02#post1551002

    break me down, build me back up. I'd love you for ever.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpaceRogue View Post
    the only thing we have here is the 'non smelling but still toxic' stuff, it 1 step in the right direction tho
    Here.


    Tristan Elwell
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    I used them for a short while since my girlfriend owns birds and I wanted the air quality to be nice and clean. After fighting more with the paint and less with the picture I figured I'd switch back to standard oils, which I was perfectly able to use and still keep the air quality nice. I've not looked back since.

    My biggest problem was that once I went to thin them out a bit they lost their consistency entirely. Don't remember what brand I used, but it certainly wasn't the endorsement it needed for me to delve deeper into it. I'll take my solvents any day now.... I just keep em covered when not in use.

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    The one big thing you have to do with the water mixable oils is stop thinking of them as water mixable. Think of them as water clean up. You don't want to mix water into them and try to paint. They work much better if you use the mediums that are created to work with them.

    Regular oils are still superior, but if you really want to use these, get the mediums sold for use with them and use that instead of water for everything but clean up.

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    I've never had any troubles with them aside from the normal troubles that come with trying to figure out how any medium works.

    On the other hand, it probably helped that I have never used "real" oils (I switched to water-miscable oils straight from using acrylics).
    I also just completely wing it when I paint, and I don't really know enough about painting techniques to know whether issues I'm having are the fault of the medium or not...so I usually just blame it on myself.

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    I think J Wilson has a good point. I used them for a very short amount of time a while back and they were pretty much horrible. But I did use water to thin them out a lot. If you use the mediums designed for them they might react better.

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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    Would all the folks here who have tried water-miscible oils say which brands they used? (as if I couldn't guess)

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    Quote Originally Posted by J Wilson View Post
    The one big thing you have to do with the water mixable oils is stop thinking of them as water mixable. Think of them as water clean up. You don't want to mix water into them and try to paint. They work much better if you use the mediums that are created to work with them.

    Regular oils are still superior, but if you really want to use these, get the mediums sold for use with them and use that instead of water for everything but clean up.
    BUT, if you're going to do that, then there's no reason to not use regular oils, solvent free mediums, clean your brushes with oil during painting, and wash with soap and water for final cleanup.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    BUT, if you're going to do that, then there's no reason to not use regular oils, solvent free mediums, clean your brushes with oil during painting, and wash with soap and water for final cleanup.
    For any kind of serious artist, that's true 100%. The only time I've seen a half convincing argument for using the water mixable, was in an environment that just flat out forbade regular oil paint. The case I'm thinking of was an art teacher at a high school. It was, in her case, easier to convince the school board to allow water mixable oil paint than to try to educate them (ironic that it's easier to NOT educate at a school board).

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    Yup, my teacher back in high school got us VanGogh H2Oils mainly because:

    A) you could easily stain the canvas with water
    B) If for some reason you wanted to completely "erase" you could with water
    C) Turp of any kind is bad especially for "kids" (not allowed)
    D) Some people wouldn't clean their brushes well, so if needed water could be used the following class to really clean it
    E) You could clean the brushes in the sink and not worry about clogging it

    As for any difference. I'm not experienced enough to really appreciate the texture in paint,the viscosity of it, or anything really...yet. However, I will say, I do remember my paintings back in high school being a littler muddier than when I switched to regular student grade oils. But it could just be because I had no idea what I was doing at all.

    I would say buy yourself a little starter kit ~$20, and see what happens. I agree with Elwell though, you can use regular oils without solvents. Heck, one guy who came in to give a demo at my CC said he tried to avoid solvents as much as he could because of the way it starts to mess with the painting over time. So he just wipes his brush with a rag and some oil, he did mention using a phone book as well like Whitaker does.

    Then to clean, he usually does it right after painting with some soap and comes off easily. Of course if you wait two days or even three you're probably going to need to break out a solvent.

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    Sorry if I'm bringing up an old thread. . . . but I'm still unsure what to do! As of now, I paint in my tiny bedroom and the fumes get to me. I no longer use mineral spirits and I haven't used mineral spirits in almost two years now. Instead I use some orange based oil thing. I can't find any warning label on it about the fumes, so I assumed it was safer. But it still stinks, and I get a horrible headache only after painting one hour.

    I don't want to go back to acrylics! I hate acrylics! I love the look and feel of oil painting, but I'm still struggling to find a way to use oils for hours at a time without wanting to pass out

    I bought a starter holbein duo water mixable that I've been staring at for five months. I don't have the mediums for them yet, and I don't want to just use water. But if the only value of the water mixable is to use water in cleanup, well then, I might as well return them! Because I already use ONLY water and soap for cleanup anyways.

    Can anyone give me some sound advice about using oils in a small space? From the linseed oil to the liquin fine detail, it all gives me a headache after a while. . . . maybe what I'm trying to do is impossible. . . . .maybe I just need to wait until I have a bigger place to paint . . . .

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    Linseed oil gives you a headache?

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    If you get a headache from the orange stuff it is toxic. I agree with Flake oil should not give you a headache unless you get one from your furniture too which has linseed oil on it. Some people use Walnut oil as a medium for oil paints instead of turp or MS; it takes some getting used to and dries very slow but there is no toxicity with it.
    A word about the water soluble mediums they are toxic. Water soluble oils need to be used with only water for them to be nontoxic. Of course the paint is still toxic but that is the pigment and you can't escape that no matter what you use. I would invest in an air filter that can circulate the volume of air in the room at least six times an hour if you could afford it.

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    Citrus-based solvents contain turpenes just like turpentine, they're just derived from orange peels instead of pine sap. Sensitivities vary from person to person, some people are bothered by turpentine and not limonene (the main constituent of citrus solvents), some vice-versa, some neither, and some both. If you have any sort of solvent sensitivity, citrus-based solvents are probably going to be more irritating than a good quality highly refined OMS like Gamsol or Turpenoid, not less.
    Again, what you want to research is SOLVENT FREE oil painting. There's a lot of info out there.


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    solvent free oil painting, okay! I haven't used gamsol before. I do work at an art supply store and I get a 40% discount (I spoil myself) so I doesn't hurt to try

    And yes. I only used linseed oil straight from the bottle once. Painting with it was incredible! But the smell just lingered and lingered and lingered and lingered for days, I got sick of it. I wanna try some linseed oil again, but I'm gonna wait until I have a large place to paint.

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