Any point in starting now..?
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Thread: Any point in starting now..?

  1. #1
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    Any point in starting now..?

    I'm 16, a junior in high school, always been interested in art, I know it's the same old story. I have absolutely no drawing skills, no clue if I have an eye for it either. I've always wanted to do something in art: Considering going into architecture, interior design, graphics design, something along those lines. I love homes in general, so I'm leaning towards something in that area.

    I've tried to draw before, I got books, made an awful sketchbook, but to be honest I'm afraid to start. I would like to get into an art school, for one, my grades aren't very hot, and I'd like to do something in art. My concern is that it's too late, especially seeing 8 year olds in here with incredible work, is very discouraging. I have about a year and a half till college, so any advice would be great..

    Thanks,
    Aaron

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    why not just attend a community college first and take their art classes?

    a community college is low-risk, very low-cost, and easy to get into even with not-so-hot grades. You'll get to discover if this is something you really enjoy doing without spending tons of time and money going to some awful place like the Art Institute.

    You don't need to drop tons of cash to start playing around in 3D (if you feel that would be more of your thing than drawing). It's easy to download 3D software and follow tutorials on 3D Total.

    I'd highly recommend that you get your grades up and try to get into a normal university / state college and pursue their BFA program.

    I don't think I could ever recommend an Art School because truthfully they don't teach you anything that different and cost WAY too much money.

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    It's never too late if you're willing to work.

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmPed View Post
    I'm 16, a junior in high school, always been interested in art, I know it's the same old story. I have absolutely no drawing skills, no clue if I have an eye for it either. I've always wanted to do something in art: Considering going into architecture, interior design, graphics design, something along those lines. I love homes in general, so I'm leaning towards something in that area.

    I've tried to draw before, I got books, made an awful sketchbook, but to be honest I'm afraid to start. I would like to get into an art school, for one, my grades aren't very hot, and I'd like to do something in art. My concern is that it's too late, especially seeing 8 year olds in here with incredible work, is very discouraging. I have about a year and a half till college, so any advice would be great..

    Thanks,
    Aaron
    I started when I was your age, I'm 21 now if that's an indication of anything
    There are better examples tough haha...
    Seriously 16 is EARLY! Many of the professionals on this site started in their twenties or even thirties.

    Bottom line: it's never too late.

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    Heh, I don't think many people have started on their career training by age 16.. how many doctors were working hard on anatomy books when they were in highschool?....

    College is college for a reason, thats when you really dig into what you are interested in and train for a career in it.

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    Well atleast that makes me feel a lot better.. I guess I will look around at the program at the nearby community college. No matter what I won't be able to afford a 4 year school my freshman year, I would need some serious money help, and with mediocre grades, a hurt shoulder (no baseball scholarship.) I don't foresee a scholarship coming my way.

    Where I get stuck is I'm not a very good "on your own" learner. I'm one of those people that need exact instructions, or else I'll be asking questions for days. That's something I'm trying to break, which is where when I think about drawing, I spend 3 hours just thinking what to draw that will get me "good" practice.

    Basically I'm an idiot when it comes to art lol. I'm trying to get into the art class at my high school, but since I screwed off Freshman year I have a pretty full schedule :/ Senior year I guess.

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    On a side note:

    I need a real beginner, interesting book to read. Anything really, I have $100 to spend (ty Christmas) I want to draw things like Cars, Guitars, Buildings, and people, then later moving into things like drawing insides of homes, and cityscapes.

    I have a notebook to draw in, and some set of pencils, with a bunch of erasers, so material recommendations are open also.

    Thanks,

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  8. #8
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    Zazerzs is offline ....bing me the bore worms Level 7 Gladiator: Samnite
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    sounds like you need to learn perspective cause without it nothing will look right.

    There is a download on the CA downloads that people seem to like.

    http://media.massiveblack.com/downloads.html

    There is also Scott Robertson, if you haven't heard of him check his instructional stuff out.

    also, although its a little out of your price range for now, look for instruction like this

    http://www.barnstonestudios.com/

    also scour the interwebs for good video instruction,with all the blogs ,youtubes, ect there is some awesome free info out there.

    you can find stuff like this guy http://www.freshdesigner.com/ and many more

    oh yeah and all the stuff here http://www.conceptart.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=88

    im sure you get the idea
    GL

    Last edited by Zazerzs; December 27th, 2009 at 12:43 AM.
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    You really need a solid book on perspective -- understanding how to simulate 3D space on a 2D surface is one of the keys to understanding drawing. David Chelsea's Perspective for Comic Book Artists is acceptable, though it tries to be a little too cute. I really like John Raynes' The Complete Guide to Perspective. Most large book stores or libraries will have a few perspective books -- take the time and browse before buying.

    I really like Jack Hamm's Drawing The Head and Figure -- it's a nice, concise book for the beginner that touches on all the primary points for drawing the human figure in or out of costume.

    A few worthwhile buys would include Peck's Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist, Bridgman's Life Drawing, Bang's Picture This (for composition), and a nice general approach to imaginative art book like Gurney's Imaginative Realism or Howe's Fantasy Art Workshop so you can get a good sense of how professionals utilize the basics shown in the other books in their day-to-day work.

    I started off using Xmas money to buy art books when I was in my teens and haven't stopped -- half the rooms in my house have shelves creaking under the weight of art books

    Best of luck,

    ~Richard

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    do a search around here or google loomis pdf files too.
    an awesome free resource. priceless in itself.

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  11. #11
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    Awesome, thanks a ton, I'll go out tomorrow and look at those perspective books, I kind of understand the classic "single vanishing point" and very little 2 points, that's about it though.

    Thanks,

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