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  1. #1
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    Question The to-do list of the artist

    Since I saw one of the greatest CA's artists say "I wish I hadn't spent any time on that subject" (from Mentler I think), I couldn't stop thinking about if what I am learning now by myself was actually worth doing.

    What should a beginner do and know before becoming a real artist?

    Please I am really looking forward to useful answers. If yours is in the mood of "Everything" or any kind of sarcastic comment, simply quit this thread if you don't have any kind of justified reason to make that sort of replies.

    Thanks in advance: ZY

    PS: I'm sorry if this is just the same question another person posted at another thread.

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  3. #2
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    Do lots of sketching, learn to use reference, study color theory, anatomy and perspective and experiment with different materials. I would say those would be the most helpful things to do as a beginner.

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  5. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZenitYerkes View Post
    I couldn't stop thinking about if what I am learning now by myself was actually worth doing.
    It is.

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  6. #4
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    anatomy, perspective, shading (form) are what I would start with. composition and color theory would probaly be next. all of those are huge things to tackle, so it's going to be years before you master any of them (perspective you could probably learn a bit quicker, seeing as it's just learning basic rules that have already been established).

    The reality though is that you're not a machine, you need to have fun drawing, so don't feel too bad if you spend a day drawing goofy stuff... just try to have consistency on the foundational excercises.

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  8. #5
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    First I would do everything to fall in love with the process... Seriously

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  10. #6
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    Don't get fussy with details, in anything you draw. Detals will come later; they're just the product of time and patience so anyone can do them.

    The human body, the human body, and more human body. But also try more well-known animals like horses and cats and dogs. Nature, alla prima paintings help a lot to understand atmosphere, perspective, light, and colour.

    Still lives! I think they're incredibly useful to everyone. And most certainly not boring! Draw little objects you see around you, set up bigger still lives. It's all great and fun.

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  12. #7
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    this

    http://www.barnstonestudios.com/

    I'm watching them now, great stuff.

    Last edited by Zazerzs; December 24th, 2009 at 05:39 PM.
    "Talent is a word found in the mouth of the lazy to dismiss the hard work of those who have achieved."
    Anatomy Thread
    Sketchbook
    Interested in learning more about color? Read this!
    Fletcher:Color Control
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  14. #8
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    I like the way Andrew Loomis puts it:

    Expert use of the fundamentals is the only basis there is for learning to draw. These fundamentals can be listed, studied, and carried out in your own way. They are: proportion, anatomy, perspective, values, color, and knowledge of mediums and materials. Each of these can be the subject of infinite study and observation.


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  16. #9
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    focus on getting the big picture rather than small details. Gestures and rhythm are the best things to focus on from the start. In other words start with Buggs Bunny and work your way up to Phil Hale.

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  18. #10
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    To elaborate on my earlier post, being afraid to make mistakes will hinder your growth more than anything. Use what people tell you as a guideline, but don't be scared to follow your own intuition. You'll learn from mistakes more than you'll learn from success.

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  20. #11
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    The more I go into the art world, the more I realize that there is no line to becoming a "real artist".

    Basically, it comes down to simply being able to produce works of value (at least for the "real artist" in a career sense).

    I know artists that can't really draw... at all. They use countless production crutches to be able to do their work (pre-made models, pictures, photoshop tricks) and they still find lots of jobs.

    When it comes down to it, you will know you are a "real artist" when you find a job (though, hobby artists are still real artists too... they can make random dots on a piece of paper and be an "artist", but I don't think we are talking about that area).

    So, what should a beginner do? Really depends on your time-frame and the type of job you want. If you want to go into rigging in a year, you probably don't want to spend time learning to paint environments. If you are going to be a compositor, well, start compositing! You don't need to know how to draw the human figure from your head perfectly if you want to be a great compositor... (even if you could do that AMAZINGLY well, you wouldn't even put your lovely figure studies into a portfolio going for a compositing job).

    If you aren't sure what you want to do, and have 4 years ahead of you...well, a more general approach is fine until you get an idea of where you want to be. But once you find out where your goal is you should spend time focusing on the aspects surrounding that area (knowing the different stages of the pipeline and being able to do them to some degree in addition to the primary goal you have. Such as a concept artist knowing a bit about modeling will make finding work a bit easier).

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  22. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZenitYerkes View Post
    Since I saw one of the greatest CA's artists say "I wish I hadn't spent any time on that subject" (from Mentler I think), I couldn't stop thinking about if what I am learning now by myself was actually worth doing.
    The thing is, the subjects you'll most regret spending time on will be unique for you, and you'll only know them after you've spent time on them.

    I think the only thing I ever regretted was avoiding challenges when I should have been seeking them out.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

    "There are two kinds of students: the self-taught and the hopeless."
    - Dr. Piotr Rudnicki
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  24. #13
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    Draw things that interest you from life, art, and photos. Always be aware of the meaningfulness of the thing you're drawing, it's expression. Too many beginners draw people but force themselves to think of diagramatic anatomy instead of paying attention to the character of the person, draw massive monuments but force themselves to think of vanishing points. Always pay attention to what the actuality before you has to teach, not putting your attention on some dozen rules of genericness.

    Sketchbook

    "Beliefs are rules for action"
    "Knowledge is proven in action."
    "It's use is it's meaning."
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  26. #14
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    One of the most successful artists of the late 19th century said it best

    "Theory has no place in an artist's basic education. It is the eye and the hand that should be exercised during the impressionable years of youth. It is always possible to later acquire the accessory knowledge involved in the production of a work of art, but never -- and I want to stress that point -- never can the will, perseverance, and tenacity of a mature man make up for insufficient practice. And can there be such anguish compared to that felt by the artist who sees the realization of his dream compromised by weak execution?"

    William Adolphe Bouguereau

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  28. #15
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    dpaint, I have to agree! It drives me nuts when I see beginners ask questions here about stuff they could have found about by trying, in about an hour! What ever happened of trying stuff? Looks like people want all the answers wihout getting their hands dirty.

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  29. #16
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    Apart from doing art, READ BOOKS. If you're thinking somewhat visually they're a great way to have things to draw, if you're not the one that loves to grind studies.

    And if you're drawing and you're not having a good day, grab a medium you wouldn't usually use (like a pen) and just draw shapes, 2d shapes, 3d shapes, odd stuff, semi-referenced stuff from life, just draw space filler poops, ees fun, and will help you get relaxed.

    (23:41:52) (ArneLurk) I woner of there are people who have hairy penises
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  30. #17
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    I think a good eye is crucial to improvement when starting out. By a good eye I mean the ability to objectively (to a certain degree) critique drawings (especially your own) and spot anatomy mistakes, symmetry issues, perspective problems, line quality, etc.

    When I started out at a class I had to draw an airplane and a interior of a room. I didn't had any favourite artists nor a library of drawings. I finished the two drawings and thought they looked pretty good. Heck even my mom thought so . But in fact they were crap. Really. The teacher pointed the mistakes but I really didn't understand much of what he said was wrong - perspective, line, shading, etc. I had no "eye" and it took me a year or so to get it - afterwhich I knew what was wrong with my drawings (to a certain level) and what things I should fix and work on.

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