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Thread: drawntz

  1. #1
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    drawntz

    New sketchbook and a fresh start. These are studies completed today. Any feedback is appreciated.

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    Last edited by jonmorris; April 7th, 2010 at 02:41 AM.
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  3. #2
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    Looks good, a great start. The details and shading on the top guy's face is good but it looks like the proportions are off a little. His left eye looks too close to his nose compared to the right eye, and it looks too low as well. His head is tilted so it should be slighly lower, but i think its just a TAD bit too low. The nose, right eye, and mouth all look great though. Hope this was helpful! Keep up the good work! (the other stone guy on the bottom looks fine, I couldnt think of any critiques for it)
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChristianWeeks View Post
    Looks good, a great start. The details and shading on the top guy's face is good but it looks like the proportions are off a little. His left eye looks too close to his nose compared to the right eye, and it looks too low as well. His head is tilted so it should be slighly lower, but i think its just a TAD bit too low. The nose, right eye, and mouth all look great though. Hope this was helpful! Keep up the good work! (the other stone guy on the bottom looks fine, I couldnt think of any critiques for it)
    You're right the slant of the eyes doesn't match the nose and mouth. I should have seen that before I started finishing the drawing. Still working on my proportioning. That's a portrait of Francis Bacon if anyone is interested. Struggled with it quite a bit.

    The bust was drawn much more quickly, and I think was an easier subject. Everything was simply laid out as opposed to doing a real human face.

    Thank you Christian.
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    np, and welcome to the forums!
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    Don't be shy, post some more. The bust that was drawn, does look like the lines are fluid and have a variety of line sensitivity. And the wings too. It's really a good thing that when you start your drawings you draw lightly and then transition to more darks. The portrait there is a good start, just be aware of your values. As there isn't much range from dark to lights. Otherwise great job man and keep it up.
    You can visit me at my new blog Musings & Quips of an Artist

    I'm out to conquer the world equipped with a pencil, digital paint and a
    Sketchbook
    and when I do achieve that goal...I'll conquer the moon too


    "When you draw nervously you end up with a nervous drawing, so drawing strongly produces lines filled with vitality"- Nightow Yasuhiro

    "Use the ability you already have, and use it, and use it, and make it develop itself."-Robert Henri
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanakris View Post
    Don't be shy, post some more. The bust that was drawn, does look like the lines are fluid and have a variety of line sensitivity. And the wings too. It's really a good thing that when you start your drawings you draw lightly and then transition to more darks. The portrait there is a good start, just be aware of your values. As there isn't much range from dark to lights. Otherwise great job man and keep it up.
    Thank you Sanakris. No worries, I'm not shy nor sensitive to critique. The entire point of the sketchbook is to improve my drawing skills and get what help this website can provide. I did the portrait on smooth paper with a mechanical pencil. May have been a mistake. I like the way it smudges but found shading with any sort of gradation difficult. Not that my shading is normally flawless. I'd like to improve it along with everything else.

    And thanks Christian. I'm actually not new to the forums, just decided to start over and hold myself to a higher standard. This is my second sketchbook.

    I had some more time today so did another study. This took about an hour and a half I believe. The foreshortening in the right leg gave me the most trouble. Overall I had allot of difficulty. I need to practice figure drawing more often.

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    Just one thing I saw about your latest figure right away is that her right arm and leg (viewer's left) look kind of short and spindly compared to the rest of the body. But I think it looks pretty good besides that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Gray View Post
    Just one thing I saw about your latest figure right away is that her right arm and leg (viewer's left) look kind of short and spindly compared to the rest of the body. But I think it looks pretty good besides that.
    Wow you're right. That arm looks like it's about ready to snap off. I think I can fix that, but that leg is killing me.
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    You'll get better at it, for sure. If you work at it. Or you could be like me and laze around for year and a half...

    luckily we have leeway in childhood to slack; but im glad I got out of it. Best advice is to never stop; always do a drawing a day. And study what you suck at. No use studying for a test you can already pass.
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    Hi, Jon--

    I checked your skbook out *specifically* since I saw our pal, Francis Bacon, in the preview avatar...so it looks like him! (It is wonky, though, and you want to make sure that any Wonk you show is intentional.) But I definitely like the drawing.

    You're investigating the right things with your female life drawing. Keep an eye out for your proportions and your marks:

    Proportions: Measure, measure, measure. Her lower half feels small and jammed-in to fit the bottom edge of your paper. An amazingly useful, quick trick is this: Make little (erasable) lines, as your first marks, to mark the top and bottom of your figure. Next, make a mark exactly halfway between them. Now use a pencil or short dowel to measure the figure in real life, and notice where the halfway point is on the figure. Also using your measuring tool, check relative lengths, like: How many heads high?, The upper arm is the same length as?, etc. Then you can check angles from life to drawing using the measuring tool. You're going to find that, using those techniques and an unflinching willingness to erase, that proportions are just a matter of time and effort--and no big deal.

    Also, flip your paper as you work and keep a small mirror with you. Proportional problems will jump out at you, and you'll know where to focus your efforts.

    The female life drawing has some nice passages: Her left upper arm is good, as is her left torso and breast area. The head's pretty good too, but the eye is a little low and left and her nose-to-chin area is a bit compressed. I can tell you paid a lot of attention to her legs--just keep measuring.

    As for marks: think longer, planar/angular lines at first. When those structural underdrawing lines accurately reflect the proportions you can go over them with the approproate "line-quality" lines and you can avoid the Hairy Drawing Look. Also, keep practicing your shading/hatching. You might want to look into doing some charcoal Ground Drawings so you can think about areas of light and shadow (and how they relate to form, weight, and volume) without bringing hatching into it.

    Keep it up!

    Cheers,

    Nick
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  16. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by drd View Post
    You'll get better at it, for sure. If you work at it. Or you could be like me and laze around for year and a half...

    luckily we have leeway in childhood to slack; but im glad I got out of it. Best advice is to never stop; always do a drawing a day. And study what you suck at. No use studying for a test you can already pass.
    Absolutely. My intentions are to do just that. Unfortunately I've been slacking much more than a year and a half and my childhood is far behind me.

    But Francis Bacon was 35 when he blossomed and Beksiński was approaching his 50s when he first decided to become a painter. I'm out of excuses.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rusko-berger View Post
    Hi, Jon--

    I checked your skbook out *specifically* since I saw our pal, Francis Bacon, in the preview avatar...so it looks like him! (It is wonky, though, and you want to make sure that any Wonk you show is intentional.) But I definitely like the drawing.

    You're investigating the right things with your female life drawing. Keep an eye out for your proportions and your marks:

    Proportions: Measure, measure, measure. Her lower half feels small and jammed-in to fit the bottom edge of your paper. An amazingly useful, quick trick is this: Make little (erasable) lines, as your first marks, to mark the top and bottom of your figure. Next, make a mark exactly halfway between them. Now use a pencil or short dowel to measure the figure in real life, and notice where the halfway point is on the figure. Also using your measuring tool, check relative lengths, like: How many heads high?, The upper arm is the same length as?, etc. Then you can check angles from life to drawing using the measuring tool. You're going to find that, using those techniques and an unflinching willingness to erase, that proportions are just a matter of time and effort--and no big deal.

    Also, flip your paper as you work and keep a small mirror with you. Proportional problems will jump out at you, and you'll know where to focus your efforts.

    The female life drawing has some nice passages: Her left upper arm is good, as is her left torso and breast area. The head's pretty good too, but the eye is a little low and left and her nose-to-chin area is a bit compressed. I can tell you paid a lot of attention to her legs--just keep measuring.

    As for marks: think longer, planar/angular lines at first. When those structural underdrawing lines accurately reflect the proportions you can go over them with the approproate "line-quality" lines and you can avoid the Hairy Drawing Look. Also, keep practicing your shading/hatching. You might want to look into doing some charcoal Ground Drawings so you can think about areas of light and shadow (and how they relate to form, weight, and volume) without bringing hatching into it.

    Keep it up!

    Cheers,

    Nick
    Thank you very much! I'll have to refer back to this tomorrow. I do the classic beginners mistake over and over jumping into the drawing before I know where everything going. I'll give these steps a shot. Really appreciate it.

    And Bacon's the man. Figured why not kick off the sketchbook with one of my favorite artists.
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  18. #13
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    nice,,, do daily sketching...! goodluck.
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