Need Critiques + Printing Tips for a Graphic Novel Cover/Poster
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Need Critiques + Printing Tips for a Graphic Novel Cover/Poster

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Seattle, USA
    Posts
    516
    Thanks
    290
    Thanked 149 Times in 122 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Need Critiques + Printing Tips for a Graphic Novel Cover/Poster

    So a friend and I have a long term graphic novel project planned for whenever I am a master digital painter. His birthday just passed and I have been planning ton giving him a poster/concept painting in the style of the star wars/lord of the rings type epic movie posters.

    I am going to print it at Fedex (it think... is this a good choice? I searched and found them to be the most affordable. its about 40$ for an 18 by 24 inch poster).

    Since i want it printed at 18 by 24, i am working at 300 pixels per inch on that size file in photoshop... its like 5 thousand by 7 pixels. and my computer is shitty and not pleased with that decision... so if i should be working smaller or on a lower res, please let me know.

    also, i am working in RGB mode... if i should do a different color set up or change some setting to be ideal for color preservation, please let me know.

    on top of the printing questions, I would love any advice or critiques on the design, colors, layout, anything.

    again, this is an early stage but the main idea is down so all suggestions and crits will be taken into consideration as i continue

    thanks for any help you can offer. sorry for such a long preface... im just excited to make a poster and print it

    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Art and kindness are my weapons of choice.

    My Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,888
    Thanks
    752
    Thanked 3,153 Times in 1,067 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The composition is really busy and that makes me confused when looking at it. I'm not quite sure what exactly is going on and who the characters are supposed to be. I would try breaking it down into masses and cleaning it up from there. Taking the first Star Wars poster as an example:



    You have this large, looming villain in the background. You can tell without ever seeing the movie, that he is up to no good. So you can do a similar thing with the main villain, who I assume is the skull guy in the very background.

    Up front, you have the hero. Notice how he looks very little like Mark Hamil. He's just sort of a generic good guy that plays on the "Shining knight on horseback" thing. So you could take your protagonist, and throw him in the foreground too. Just with your own pose, and your own design. And you can have a few secondary characters too, but notice how not every character is on the poster. Just the hero, the bad guy, and the damsel in distress and some comedic side-characters.

    There is also a well established foreground, mid ground, and background. Luke and Leia are in the foreground, C3PO and R2D2 in the mid ground and everything else in the background. As of right now, everything in your poster appears to be competing for the foreground. This makes it very flat.

    And to be totally clear, I'm not saying rip off the poster design. But you can take some tips from it and apply it to your poster in your own unique way. This poster was made based on some very solid and fundamental design principles, so it would be wise to take notes.

    You have a set color palette, which is very good. Push values a little more to add depth and separate your image into planes of 3D space.

    "Astronomy offers an aesthetic indulgence not duplicated in any other field. This is not an academic or hypothetical attraction and should require no apologies, for the beauty to be found in the skies has been universally appreciated for unrecorded centuries."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to s.ketch For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    13
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'll try to keep this short.

    I can't comment on what's right or wrong with your picture, but I can tell you from experience that your on screen color will be different from printed material.
    I am a self taught graphic designer and the art of color matching is still a mystery to me. 300 dpi is the lowest resolution I would use if it were a photograph (you could go higher not lower). In your case, if the finale image is not super detailed (like a realistic photo) you could drop down to 200 dpi (*caution* , lowering the dpi on an existing file may alter the image size and quility). Also it would be best to work in CMYK mode since this will go to print. When in CMYK mode the software you are using tries to calibrate your screen colors to more accurately display your printable colors. When you do go to get it printed, don't be surprised if some of the colors are way off. If I had to bet I'd say it will print darker than you would like. If your not satisfied with the print out most places will not make you pay (most will then dispose of the picture).

    hope this helped ;]

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Bastard Bug For This Useful Post:


Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •