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Thread: Better way to blend this?

  1. #1
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    Better way to blend this?

    Well, I tend to work on 5 different things at once. I haven't forgotten about my other ones. I will update those later. But, here is a new piece I'm working on. The shading of her left eye (our right) is lame. Not sure if there is a better way to blend that it, but i dont like the fact that it looks like she got punched in the face, lol. Any pro tips for shading the eye? Any other crits are welcome of course.
    Thanks.
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    Last edited by Havok Reed; December 11th, 2009 at 01:38 AM.
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    not really, i google stuff and go off of things I see, but this is probobly 95% from my head here. yea it does seem a bit long, you should have seen it before

    I can shorten the chin and forehead. Could someone point out the shading flaws? The light is coming from that one side. The only thing i see that could be adjusted is the light on the right, on her cheek. I know light does hit that spot passed the nose, onto the cheek.
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    Ok, the long face was due to the chin. So i shortened that. Looks better to me, but i'd like another opinion.

    Also i made the light on HER left cheek not so big.
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    That's better, and the shading seems improved. What you should do now is draw the basic skull on a separate layer and the angle/direction of light source (I have a thread on here that demonstrates that. Then use what you know about cast shadows and the way basic 3D shapes are shaded to render the skull. Then it's a simple copy onto the face!

    Hope that helps more ^_^
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    Your problem isn't blending, it's that you don't understand the structure of the eye.
    Edit: Sorry, deja vu. Also,
    Quote Originally Posted by Nezumi Works View Post
    Remember structure. The eyeball itself is a three-dimensional form set in a socket, with skin and muscle surrounding and covering it. Get a good idea of the internal anatomy and that will inform how you do your shading and linework. Hamm is a good choice, as is Loomis. Also do studies from anatomy books to give yourself an idea of the underlying structure.
    Last edited by Elwell; December 9th, 2009 at 04:08 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Your problem isn't blending, it's that you don't understand the structure of the eye.
    ^ This

    The reason the shading is off is because the structure is off... It's difficult for us to give advice on what's wrong with the shading because what's underneath it is difficult to understand, identify or mentally place in a 3D space...

    Your absolute best bet for getting correct shading is to learn how to draw the structure. It's a form follows function thing. Shadows fall across a form the way they do because of how they're shaped.

    Here's my advice on how to get the shading right:
    Go to a Halloween shop, but a skull.
    Go to Wal Mart, buy a cheap lamp and a light bulb.
    Clear some desk space, light the skull.
    Study how the shadows play across the surfaces.

    Or

    Buy a mirror and light your own face.
    Study how the shadows play across the surfaces of your head.

    Photographic references are great, but nothing beats drawing from life.
    Last edited by alexboyer; December 9th, 2009 at 04:35 PM.
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    I too will expand upon what other people here have said in terms of the shape of the head. I understand you're primarily looking for help with the shading, but the shape has to be right in order for the shading to be correct. Proper shading is completely reliant on the 3-dimensional surface for it to be on.

    The skull, if separated into simple shapes, is an oblong spherical shape for the cranium (when viewed from the side or 3/4 view as seen here) and then the jaw completes the shape beneath. The neck does not attach flush with the back of the cranium, so the skull actually 'pokes out' a bit - feel the back of your own head and you'll see what I mean. Although her neck is hidden by her hair, it feels to me like the neck is too flush with the back of the skull, and that's part of what's causing everything to look elongated.
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    just to reinforce some of the points already made above. I'm no expect so please correct me if I'm wrong.

    understanding the structure will show that the cranium (the part of the skull that encloses the brain) is more like a sphere/egg. Not as smooth but the basic shape is similar. You've shaded it as if there was a concave shape there, on her forehead. I don't know if its the best method, but it helps to conceive things as basic shapes. That way, it'll help you think about the way light affect such shapes. Study some geometric shapes too and how light affects the shadow to have a better understanding. Cones, Spheres, Cubes, Cylinders.
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  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Edit: Sorry, deja vu. Also,
    Yea, but that was more about the hair than anything. I haven't touched that piece in a long time.

    Here's my advice on how to get the shading right:
    Go to a Halloween shop, but a skull.
    Go to Wal Mart, buy a cheap lamp and a light bulb.
    Clear some desk space, light the skull.
    Study how the shadows play across the surfaces.

    Or

    Buy a mirror and light your own face.
    Study how the shadows play across the surfaces of your head.

    Photographic references are great, but nothing beats drawing from life.
    Ill have to go with the latter. Im a bit poor atm xD

    Thanks to the other suggestions as well.

    I have the Loomis books and all the other ones that are normally suggested. Even though I follow the steps on how to draw the eye. I just cant seem to get it straight
    Does anyone else have their own kind of process of doing things that they wouldn't mind sharing?
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  12. #11
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    ohh, this has helped me draw eyes havok,

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/9561347/Bu...omy-in-English


    theres pages in there about the eye and if i do say so myself, its very helpful! just keep practicing untill you get it right, also no one started out as a perfect drawer.
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    There's some very good information on drawing the eye here. They've got sections on other facial features which are good as well. You'd do well to go through the whole thing, given that you seem to have multiple issues with head construction. It's complex, so that's hardly something unusual.

    For instance, the lips aren't really structured, the eyes don't quite line up, and the nose is off centre in perspective. The far cheekbone is quite far forward, and the features don't really relate to each other (the nose relates to the mouth and eyebrow, creating the ridge of the depression the eye sits in, the cheekbone frames it from underneath and relates to the mouth, the mouth relates to the chin and the depression between the two, etc.). Simply put, you need to do a lot more structural studies and life drawing to really get a good feel for the construction of the head. Loomis, as always, is good for this, and there are numerous tutorials 'round the net, such as this one.

    Good luck to you!
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  15. #13
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    Zokay, I found a skull online and used it as a reference to do a sketch over. Doing this showed me many things wrong with my drawing. does anyone see any errors in this sketch over? I included my reference.
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