Is it possible to draw portrait like realistic faces from the imagination? - Page 5
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5
Results 121 to 149 of 149

Thread: Is it possible to draw portrait like realistic faces from the imagination?

  1. #121
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,287
    Thanks
    219
    Thanked 167 Times in 106 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    But as Howard Pyle and Harvey Dunn would often say, until you are independent of the model, you don't really know how to draw. And if you don't really know how to draw, you won't really know how to compose.
    But that seems kind of vague about how WELL one has to be able to draw independent of the model. Could it mean being able to use mannikins like in Loomis's book?


    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    The above picture was done by NC Wyeth in less than a days time without reference, with the possible exception of the gun, which he may have had in his studio. I think the quality of the image speaks for itself. There is no reference that can make this composition happen.
    Yeah, but still... Wyeth did use models as well back then. I have no doubt that painting from models consistently for years, one could paint from memory.

    Attached Images Attached Images    
     

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    551
    Thanks
    72
    Thanked 228 Times in 148 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by HunterKiller_ View Post
    There's a difference between 'realistic' and 'believable'.
    I wouldn't call Leyendecker or Loomis's faces 'realistic', they are in fact subtle caricatures, which is exactly what makes them great.
    Hmm, I think the semantics of the issue is getting in the way. Let me show what 'realistic' means to me.



    Sure, Loomis has idealized and simplified the model, but if you superimpose the painting over the picture, it's quite accurate, all that needs to be there is there. He's done the same in the previous drawings I posted. Leyendecker may be a caricature of sorts, but ok let's call it and the others "believable".

    The point, I think, is getting to an image that has a personalized aesthetic that is compatible with the general aesthetic as well, or at least that of the niche market you are interested in working in. But, that must go through the route of obtaining the skill to understand reality and paint it, because ultimately, that's where we get out sense of beauty from.

    It's a cool feat to be able to draw very well from memory, but its also cooler to have that "thing" in your art that gives it interest and life. If you get to it through reference, little or lot it doesn't matter.

    I agree with Kev Ferrara's view by the way. The work of us beginners is stiff, but so is the work of guys who are too close to their photographic reference, sometimes.

    "Don't judge a book by it's cover" Frank Frazetta 1928-2010
    RIP Frank.

    DA gallery http://michaelsyrigos.deviantart.com/gallery/

    CA Sketchbook http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=131601
     

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Line For This Useful Post:


  4. #123
    kev ferrara is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,059
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,150 Times in 1,700 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Bowlin View Post
    But that seems kind of vague about how WELL one has to be able to draw independent of the model. Could it mean being able to use mannikins like in Loomis's book?
    Mannequins won't get you anywhere close. Loomis used reference extensively because his work, 99 percent of the time, did not require anything that couldn't be photographed. In looking at your work, Bowlin, you should be using reference extensively and drawing from the imagination in your spare time. I think you are going along fine in your studies. Although I think you should worry less, and draw more, imho.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bowlin View Post
    Yeah, but still... Wyeth did use models as well back then. I have no doubt that painting from models consistently for years, one could paint from memory.
    No, it is by painting and drawing from memory for years... the constant exercise of one's knowledge of lighting, form, anatomy, and gesture... that leads to one being able to work from the imagination. Working from reference and models is part of the education of one's imagination, as well as a method of helping to get accuracy in one's work.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
     

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  6. #124
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,287
    Thanks
    219
    Thanked 167 Times in 106 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Kev - Well, I posted that pic to show that he did indirectly reference from models to some extent. That painting you posted was done from sketches at Gill Ranch, then painted in Denever. It's listed on "N.C. Wyeth a biography" page 123. The book also talks about how he referenced from Remington for these pictures too. Exactly what and how much he referenced from Remington, I don't know. How many sketches he did at the ranch seems impossible to know, also.

     

  7. #125
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    One has to be very, very careful using photographs of artists working as evidence of process, since a large percentage of them are staged.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
     

  8. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  9. #126
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    The Abyss, Manchester UK
    Posts
    2,921
    Thanks
    1,202
    Thanked 2,265 Times in 736 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You mean artists don't always tell the truth about their process?! I'm... I'm... speechless! Shocked and speechless! And stunned... and maybe a little... dumbfounded too...

     

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Aly Fell For This Useful Post:


  11. #127
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,881
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,434 Times in 746 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Staged? I doubt it...


    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
     

  12. #128
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,972
    Thanks
    1,331
    Thanked 1,923 Times in 757 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Extreme watercolour painting...

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
     

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Chris Bennett For This Useful Post:


  14. #129
    HunterKiller_'s Avatar
    HunterKiller_ is offline Registered User Level 15 Gladiator: Spartacus' Hoplomachi
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    3,763
    Thanks
    2,126
    Thanked 1,004 Times in 654 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    My previous comment was isolated to achieving photorealism, which is what I thought the original discussion was about.
    I have no resentment towards creating pictures entirely without reference. Just for the record.

    Quote Originally Posted by bcarman View Post
    This doesn't help the discussion at all as again realistic is not defined and believable is another thing altogether. Tell us what realistic is and why drawing realistically without reference is wank. Wank is a cool word though isn't it.
    My point was that it doesn't matter how a picture is created. If it's good then it's good.
    One guys paints a scene from his dome, another guys paints an equally good one with reference aid. The viewer doesn't know the process and in the end it doesn't mean anything, except that the guy who painted from memory can brag about it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Sonea View Post
    Staged? I doubt it...
    Wow... That's the dictionary definition of dedication.

    Last edited by HunterKiller_; February 12th, 2012 at 05:20 PM.
     

  15. #130
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    2,364
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 887 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    But. . . but. . .

    N.C. Wyeth was a "mere illustrator."

    [dodges brick and flees from Art Discussion. . .]

     

  16. #131
    kev ferrara is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,059
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,150 Times in 1,700 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Bowlin View Post
    Kev - Well, I posted that pic to show that he did indirectly reference from models to some extent.
    Yes, but who doesn't know that? You seem hell bent on making the same points over and over... yes, great artists use reference... all the time. And the point is that less great artists get used by their reference because they know less than the photo can show them. And since photos are lifeless and suck at capturing the aesthetic reality of experience, if one isn't a better artist than the camera, one's art is going to partake of the same suck as photography.

    I painted from the model all day today at Garin Baker's studio and he said something interesting about reference during a break. Garin is a strong illustrator and muralist who does not believe in working from the imagination. He studied with Leffel, Greenberg, Silverman, and Ginsburg, and was trained to always use reference, because the work will not have integrity unless it comes from life, more or less directly. He said you simply can't make a good work of art from a single photograph of the subject. You need way more information than is available in a single shot to make a painting that works.

    And, for me, the reason for this goes to what I was just saying. The reference photographs are there to educate you about the subject. They aren't there to supply you directly with the visual content of your picture. Because your goal as an artist is not to educate somebody about the subject in turn, but to make a work of art of the subject.

    Even leaving aside gesture... you can't even get the form of an object from a single photo. Because the depiction of form in art is a metaphoric response to the sculptural presence of a volume, it is not about what the object looks like per se. It takes us artists a very long time to get our heads around this concept because it is so through the looking glass compared to what we think we're doing when we first set out to learn our craft. (In fact, most "realists" don't even realize this is what's really going on.)

    Anyway... Stanley Meltzoff was a funny guy, but that joke sort of backfired on him. Because after that photo was published, he received letters for years asking him about the truth of it. I highly recommend Meltzoff's recent monograph. He was one of the last of the truly great illustrators.

    Last edited by kev ferrara; February 12th, 2012 at 07:33 PM.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
     

  17. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  18. #132
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    Anyway... Stanley Meltzoff was a funny guy, but that joke sort of backfired on him. Because after that photo was published, he received letters for years asking him about the truth of it. I highly recommend Meltzoff's recent monograph. He was one of the last of the truly great illustrators.
    True enough, but...
    I read an article in an old (1930s) Natural History magazine about when the AMNH was designing the coral reef exhibit in the Hall of Ocean Life. Because there wasn't accurate underwater color photography back then, and because specimens quickly lost their color when collected, museum artists in diving helmets actually did do underwater color studies in oil paint on metal plates.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
     

  19. #133
    kev ferrara is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,059
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,150 Times in 1,700 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
     

  20. The Following User Says Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  21. #134
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,142
    Thanks
    778
    Thanked 489 Times in 311 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    my figure drawing teacher does this sort of portrait sketch for class demos, out of his head all the time... he also has about 35 or 40 years of experience drawing and painting figures.
    (I googled a similar image - I'll take a photo of what he does next time he does it)
    Sometimes he does things from a model, sometimes from his head, kind of depends on the lecture and focus of the demo.

    Part of the class we are learning observation, and part of the class we are learning construction, so that you can draw 'from your head' too.

    Even in beginning drawing and beginning figure drawing I'm already noticing what Kev is talking about, how you just don;t get the same information from the photo as you do from the observation. I think for one, our stereo vision plays a big part. Photo seems to give us a flattened view of what we may see out of one eye. When we draw from life, we sort of process what we see with both, and draw our impression of it. Something that my teacher often tells us is 'don't be afraid to exaggerate a bit' (he corrects us if we do too much too). Sometimes you need to be there and see the model from other subtly different points of view in order to exaggerate what seems important, or what we want to accent.



    Last edited by Conniekat8; February 12th, 2012 at 09:13 PM.
     

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to Conniekat8 For This Useful Post:


  23. #135
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,142
    Thanks
    778
    Thanked 489 Times in 311 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Sonea View Post
    Staged? I doubt it...
    Is that the Wet-in-wet painting technique?

     

  24. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Conniekat8 For This Useful Post:


  25. #136
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    That shot of Chris Olsen in the helmet is awesome.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
     

  26. #137
    kev ferrara is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,059
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,150 Times in 1,700 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    That shot of Chris Olsen in the helmet is awesome.
    Agreed. I was going to say its very Robot Monster. But really its more...

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
     

  27. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  28. #138
    kev ferrara is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,059
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,150 Times in 1,700 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    my figure drawing teacher does this sort of portrait sketch for class demos, out of his head all the time... he also has about 35 or 40 years of experience drawing and painting figures.
    (I googled a similar image - I'll take a photo of what he does next time he does it)
    Sometimes he does things from a model, sometimes from his head, kind of depends on the lecture and focus of the demo.

    Part of the class we are learning observation, and part of the class we are learning construction, so that you can draw 'from your head' too.
    Bloody hell, that is wretched. If that's the level of understanding your teacher holds, get out the door as quickly as possible. That is pig-ignorant, deluded amateurism at its worst. Can't you tell that?



    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
     

  29. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  30. #139
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,002
    Thanks
    891
    Thanked 1,010 Times in 539 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The photo above or the drawing from out of your head part?
    Pretty sure she said similar image as in not the teacher if it's about the issues with the picture itself which has quite a few mistakes abundant.

     

  31. #140
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Space Happy is awesome happy! I feel a caption contest coming on:
    "Let's just get back to the ship where we can get out of these glass jars and you can slip off that cape."

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
     

  32. #141
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,142
    Thanks
    778
    Thanked 489 Times in 311 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    Bloody hell, that is wretched. If that's the level of understanding your teacher holds, get out the door as quickly as possible. That is pig-ignorant, deluded amateurism at its worst. Can't you tell that?

    ??? I'm not sure I follow what you mean?

    Don't most books people about around here do the same thing, you don't just draw figure contours, you learn how the volumes and shapes and anatomical construction and all kinds of elements (I'm not sure what they're all called off the top of my head, because I'm a beginner) work?

    Or are you talking about the picture I posted? The picture is a quick google I did, of a sketch that looks like it may have taken similar amount of time as the 15-20 min demos our teacher does. I don't have any of his work handy, and being just a beginner, I don't have the refined observational or technique skills to tell really good stuff from what I posted. Actually I was looking for something that vaguely resembles what you drew. LOL

    And, no I can't tell much differece, two hour face drawing lecture and one drawing session is the sum total experience I have drawing and observing faces, I'm not expected to know the difference at this stage. After I start learning how to do it... it'll be a different story.

    You can find his work here: http://www.artrenewal.org/pages/view...%204-large.jpg

    however, that's one of his finished works, and I would guess it was observational - I think he was telling us that's a portrait of his daughter at two slightly different ages. Mirror reflection is meant to be a year younger, IIRC.

    And more here: http://www.saddleback.edu/faculty/rl...age002_002.gif He's pretty accomplished artist in addition to teaching. It's his 'out of your head' drawings that I don't have handy.

    Last edited by Conniekat8; February 13th, 2012 at 02:26 AM.
     

  33. The Following User Says Thank You to Conniekat8 For This Useful Post:


  34. #142
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,972
    Thanks
    1,331
    Thanked 1,923 Times in 757 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    my figure drawing teacher does this sort of portrait sketch for class demos, out of his head all the time... he also has about 35 or 40 years of experience drawing and painting figures.
    (I googled a similar image - I'll take a photo of what he does next time he does it)
    Sometimes he does things from a model, sometimes from his head, kind of depends on the lecture and focus of the demo.

    Part of the class we are learning observation, and part of the class we are learning construction, so that you can draw 'from your head' too.

    Even in beginning drawing and beginning figure drawing I'm already noticing what Kev is talking about, how you just don;t get the same information from the photo as you do from the observation. I think for one, our stereo vision plays a big part. Photo seems to give us a flattened view of what we may see out of one eye. When we draw from life, we sort of process what we see with both, and draw our impression of it. Something that my teacher often tells us is 'don't be afraid to exaggerate a bit' (he corrects us if we do too much too). Sometimes you need to be there and see the model from other subtly different points of view in order to exaggerate what seems important, or what we want to accent.


    His demonstration shows he knows nothing about what he is talking about. He's a fake.
    From what you posted of his 'finished work' it only furthers my opinion on the matter. Lacking imaginative focus or direction, he props up a technique based on a passive mapping of photos by hyping it up with salacious subject matter.
    Likewise, he hypes up the drawing in a similar way with all those meaningless, flashy gestures thrown over what he's done in a attempt disguise the lifelessness of his dishonest work.

    As Kev said, get yourself another teacher.

    Last edited by Chris Bennett; February 13th, 2012 at 05:37 AM.
    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
     

  35. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Chris Bennett For This Useful Post:


  36. #143
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,142
    Thanks
    778
    Thanked 489 Times in 311 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bennett View Post
    His demonstration shows he knows nothing about what he is talking about.
    ROFL, that's not my teachers sketch.

    EPIC Reading comprehension FAIL.

    By the way, he's been featured in that magazine long before you, so neener neener neener

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bennett View Post
    by hyping it up with salacious subject matter.
    Oh, I know, he should have put still life of a flower vase on the cover of a figure drawing from a model class handout so it wouldn't look salacious. *bad teacher...baaaad* I bet you teach figure drawing using clothed models.
    Oh, wait, you don't teach figure drawing. What is it that your pal DP and few others like to say, don't go on about stuff you don't do.



    ok, back on ignore you go...

    Last edited by Conniekat8; February 13th, 2012 at 06:44 AM.
     

  37. #144
    kev ferrara is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,059
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,150 Times in 1,700 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    Or are you talking about the picture I posted? The picture is a quick google I did, of a sketch that looks like it may have taken similar amount of time as the 15-20 min demos our teacher does. I don't have any of his work handy, and being just a beginner, I don't have the refined observational or technique skills to tell really good stuff from what I posted. Actually I was looking for something that vaguely resembles what you drew. LOL

    And, no I can't tell much differece...
    That's not a good sign for your future as an artist.

    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
     

  38. #145
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is online now Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,653
    Thanks
    2,625
    Thanked 5,883 Times in 2,355 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    ROFL, that's not my teachers sketch.

    EPIC Reading comprehension FAIL.

    By the way, he's been featured in that magazine long before you, so neener neener neener ...
    Why are you even commenting in here Clueless, since you can't actually draw or paint to any reasonable degree and you just regurgitate what you've heard or read and obviously don't understand? Have you ever had an original thought or opinion about anything? Something you learned all by yourself from hard work and application?
    Chris and Kev are professionals; the fact you sit in a class and listen to an art teacher doesn’t give you his understanding or abilities (if he has any); you have to earn those through more than just class assignments where all the creativity is thought out for you.

     

  39. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  40. #146
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,002
    Thanks
    891
    Thanked 1,010 Times in 539 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good lord, people are being a bit. Well..... mean. It's turning into just insult throwing.


    Even worse unless someone can correct me.
    Was this all because people didn't read it was from google images or what?
    That sounds like why Kev attacked it, then it seems like what Chris was attacking as well, then moving on to attack the finished post as well.

    Of course someone gets defensive if you basically say hey your wasting your money this teacher is shit. When people aren't even reading what you wrote and attacking a random picture.


    The guys finished work, besides the one full size, even the thumbnails it looks like the guys pretty good. I dunno. You can say that's shit, but besides the perspective on the plant to the left that bugs me a tad it seems better than a lot of teachers I've seen even at some fancy art school like MICA which is supposed to be oh so amazing. Not based on imagination or anything fantastic but definitely shows skill to me. *Shrugs*, teachers aren't going to be at the pinnacle of art skill and a world famous 'my god that's genius' artist. They just need to teach what a beginner (or whatever skill level they're teaching) wouldn't know.

    Then until the beginner does learn and know of course they're going to say what their teacher does. If your in the middle of an art class feel your learning and respect the teacher. Then suddenly there's a thread that relates to something in class the teacher does, however apparently your only supposed to share your opinion if your a professional in the field?

    Last edited by JFierce; February 13th, 2012 at 11:48 AM.
     

  41. The Following User Says Thank You to JFierce For This Useful Post:


  42. #147
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is online now Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,653
    Thanks
    2,625
    Thanked 5,883 Times in 2,355 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Its not about the picture, its about Clueless commenting on someone elses experience, trying to be the bigshot through someone else, as usual.

    In her own words
    I don't have the refined observational or technique skills to tell really good stuff from what I posted.

    but yet she feels the need to blather on, adding nothing to the discussion.

     

  43. The Following User Says Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  44. #148
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,972
    Thanks
    1,331
    Thanked 1,923 Times in 757 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    I bet you teach figure drawing using clothed models.
    Oh, wait, you don't teach figure drawing. What is it that your pal DP and few others like to say, don't go on about stuff you don't do.
    Figure drawing from the naked model is exactly what I teach, once a month to an open class whose numbers have grown so much I have had to hire a gym to fit everybody in.

    Your anger and spite is only matched by the size and weight of the chip on your shoulder. Presumably it's directly responsible for it.

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
     

  45. The Following User Says Thank You to Chris Bennett For This Useful Post:


  46. #149
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Enough.
    Everybody, go to your rooms.
    The person who started this thread hasn't even logged in since August 15th, 2010.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
     

  47. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5

Members who have read this thread: 6

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •