Need some help with pointillism
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    Need some help with pointillism

    I've been assigned a project for class that involves pointillism and was wondering if someone could direct me to some tutorials or give me some tips on it. I've searched on google and this forum, but can't seem to find any.

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    If you were assigned it in class, couldn't you just ask your teacher?

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    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=pointillism+technique

    you really couldn't find anything from google..?

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    Zazerzs is offline ....bing me the bore worms Level 7 Gladiator: Samnite
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    use lots of small dots

    what medium are you using?

    For painting do an tonal under painting let it dry.

    When applying your color:mix your colors and apply them in small stokes or points but match the value of your colors to that of your under painting.

    a student example:

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    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Personally...I would question the assignment. Maybe point out to your teacher that there is one artist in the history of art that was mildly succesful with pointilism (Georges Seurat; French Neo-Impressionist) Even then it was more of a novelty than an effective method of painting....IMHO...

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    To be a little more specific i'm looking for info on value/tone with pointillism.
    The medium is pen and ink.

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    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Ahhh...ok, that's different- and you have an opportunity to teach your teacher! Pointilism refers to the application of tiny dots of relatively pure color (points) that when viewed at a normal viewing distance blend optically to create the image.

    Tiny dots of ink applied to create value is a technique called "stippling". Stippling was a very common technique used during the golden age of illustration because it was easy to reproduce in publication. Virgil Finlay was an illustrator who used stippling to great effect. Google him and maybe do some research on "stippling technique". Good luck!

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    I second the recommendation to look at Virgil Finlay. Also glad you defined stippling v. pointillism, JeffX99 - that's a common mistake. I do mostly pen and ink stippling these days, but I don't know what to tell you aside from the obvious - dots go closer together in the dark areas, and farther apart in the light areas. I usually pencil in the outlines, ink over them, then do a flat-black ink wash with a brush in any dark shadow areas, then work from those areas out. Leaving in light pencil lines where shadows transition from dark to medium to light helps you pace your gradient. The spacing of dots makes a big difference in the texture of the final work - if you get lazy, as I often do, and do not pay attention to spacing your marks evenly, the texture is going to look much rougher in the end. Meticulously planning out your dark and light areas before you start will go a long way towards helping you figure out how far apart your dots should be in each area.

    The following are from Virgil Finlay - he used stippling in conjunction with other techniques, such as scratchboard. Here is a hefty collection of images from Finlay.

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    Thanks for the help. I think I figured it out.

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    Wow brings me back to my high school days and makes me wonder why they teach it. Makes me realise how much the high school art curriculum should be changed to reflect modern markets, they would be better off having an assignment to design a book cover or how to create iterations of concept art because those are larger markets and it would expose students to industries they might not be aware of.

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    I did THIS with Micron pens. Basically, I sketched out the outlines very lightly with pencil and some of the darker areas. Then starting with the biggest pen, started spreading dots in the darkest areas. As I went to the lighter areas, I moved smaller and smaller. I did this with 3 different sizes. If you really want to go crazy, you can get a mechanical pencil and go even lighter, but I have only taken it that far once and will never do it again. I erase lines as I go, but you can erase all your light pencil work once it is completely dry. Be sure to let it cure before you attack it with eraser. I learned that the hard way.
    \

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