My Anatomy book?
Join Free Art WorkShopJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: My Anatomy book?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    412
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 52 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    My Anatomy book?

    ok ive bought an anatomy book but i have a really stupid question to ask but i have to ask.

    in order to get good do i just have to read the book and study the pictures or do i have to draw the diagrams in the book to get use to the anatomy?

    Last edited by CarlSpringer; December 1st, 2009 at 12:14 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    653
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 230 Times in 117 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You need to know where the muscles is, where it attatches to the bone.
    Then you need to draw every image a few dozen times trying to get it to look as accurate as possible. Start with the overal shapes, just a few lines to suggest the large volumes, then start carving in the smaller shapes, etc... make sure you get the proportions right.
    Don't draw muscle fibers (waste of time).
    Inbetween doing studies from the book, try to draw the body parts at various angles from your mind. This will show you how well you remeber and understand the anatomy.

    Anatomy can be really intimidating at first, just focus on doing one thing at once. It's best to do just one bodypart a week or so and just do studies of that bodypart every day.
    Also practice gesture drawing and figure construction, otherwise all the anatomy in the world won't save you.

    Good luck!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to PieterV For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,648
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 5,878 Times in 2,354 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you want to learn to draw the human form correctly it helps to draw all the muscles and bones to familiarize yourself with their shapes and what they do; that way when you move onto life drawing and you see some odd bulge in an arm in perspective you will know what it is and what it is doing; flexing or extending.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    TASmith's Avatar
    TASmith is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Slovakia
    Posts
    4,169
    Thanks
    5,094
    Thanked 2,049 Times in 1,108 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    To learn to draw, you actually have to draw. A quick answer to all your questions is, yes, draw everything. Reading isn't enough.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    412
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 52 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    thanks would it help doing quick sketches of a cetain area then after go into more detail

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dover, NJ
    Posts
    1,133
    Thanks
    472
    Thanked 335 Times in 171 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by TASmith View Post
    To learn to draw, you actually have to draw. A quick answer to all your questions is, yes, draw everything. Reading isn't enough.
    ...though, if you're laying in bed and settling down for the night, it doesn't HURT to read the book and try to commit some things to memory too!

    "Twisted by the dark side, young Artist has become. The boy you trained, gone he is... consumed by Deviantart."
    Please, visit my SB ~ N E C R O S K E T C H I K O N ! [Updated :: November 2011]
    My DeviantArt Profile: http://dyspezzia.deviantart.com/
    My Portfolio:
    http://www.pezzworks.com
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #7
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Of course. Here's the deal: art is really, really hard. It just is. Think of it like learning to play music - you have a book with all the guitar chords - do you just have to read them and study them or do you have to sit with a guitar on your lap for hours and hours and hours (years) of painful sucking, practicing those chords, chord progressions and scales?

    "in order to get good" takes years of dedicated effort. The sooner you get started the farther you can go. Good luck!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  11. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    412
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 52 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    thanks JeffX99 and Co. i will keep studying the anatomy and i have made a sketchbook i will the link in my Sig when i can

    An Artist strives for Perfection, but never truly wants to find it, Creativity is Controlled Mistakes

    "Carl Anthony Springer"

    "those who ask a stupid question is stupid for a second. but those you do not ask the question is stupid for ever!"


    MY SKETCHBOOK!!

    Kamikazuh Sketchbook


    T i m
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    So-Cal
    Posts
    3,427
    Thanks
    2,994
    Thanked 1,778 Times in 848 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    When you study from an anatomy book, don't copy interpret. When you copy everything you learn stays with the picture. When you interpret, you take that information with you. When you finish a study immediately implement that lesson in your own original picture.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Raoul Duke For This Useful Post:


  14. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    A bunch of different places.
    Posts
    635
    Thanks
    299
    Thanked 508 Times in 230 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    ...ok.

    Nobody. Can tell you how you are going to learn.

    Period. What works for some will not work for others. You could spend 5 years drawing from that book and still wind up with the same type of drawings you did in the beginning. You could spend 5 years memorizing the book and still not be able to draw "good". Nobody can tell you for certain.

    I've seen people with three year sketchbooks do drawings from anatomy studies over and over and over. And two or three years later, they're still stuck doing the same studies and they don't really look all that different. I've seen some people do 3 studies and then use it in some amazing piece right off the bat. There is nobody here who can tell you what will work. Somewhat as a result of what Raoul is referencing.

    I will offer you this advice:

    Do not ask other people questions such as this, at least not in such a manner. "To get good what do I do." First of all, good is a term with grounds extremely founded in opinion. Good at what? Drawing all the muscles in the human arm from side view? Or just drawing a human arm? Because if your arm is always going to have clothes on it in your drawing the inside of an arm 20 times is only going to help you so much.

    "Good." Up top at that banner? "Jason Manley Composition" ad? The girl in that image - white dress? That's good. That's real good. And you can't hardly see the "anatomy" on her body, though. You can tell it is human, and the proportions are good. But really...Her arm is just a tube that is the proper proportion. The various muscles completely invisible. But it's still a damn good image.

    Good at what? Good how - in what field, in what medium? Picking up an anatomy book and drawing from it just because it's what everyone else does to make them an artist, does not mean it will make you a good artist. Doctors know anatomy better than a lot of artists do. But a lot of them still can't draw more than stick figures.

    Really just depends, man. Really just depends. Experiment, draw from whatever reference or style you like. We can't make that decision for you.

    Edit: Though - I will say that Raoul Duke has some fantastic advice for general learning. So many people do pages and pages of anatomy study, but only focus on the reference, they never actually understand the reference and are able to use it themselves thereafter.

    Last edited by Two Listen; December 16th, 2009 at 04:27 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Two Listen For This Useful Post:


  16. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    95
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 44 Times in 18 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've been asking myself this question the past few days too.

    Over the last couple of weeks I was lucky enough to get hold of a real skeleton to do studies on, and I can see the huge improvement in my knowledge and drawing of the skeleton. My intention was to study the skeleton well enough to lay down a foundation for the study of muscles. I recently moved onto the study of muscles, and it was harder than I thought it would be. The anatomy books I have are mostly reference type, so they weren't that helpful in terms of visuals. With bones, they were extremely helpful, but that's because I had a live skeleton in front of me to compare as well. With muscles, I'm suddenly stuck. I didn't have enough visuals to piece everything together.

    That's when I stumbled upon the bridgmen books that I've abandoned awhile back because they were too advanced and technical in its term usage for a beginner. Its a great book to copy from, and I intend to learn the shapes, positions, and functions of the muscles from it while using my other anatomy books as reference. Since it's the holidays and I won't have a live model class to go to, I'm thinking of doing master copies of figures and some cast drawing of the anatomy man (and drawing in the underlying skeleton + muscle attachment thereafter getting the shape). Not sure how that's gonna work for me, but you gotta experiment. Like mentioned, only you know how you learn.

    As advised, keep drawing. To be more specific though, drawing by mere copying will only improve your skills in judging angles, and if you're conscious of it, your line quality etc. To be able to really draw though, you have to understand what you're drawing. And that's where knowledge comes in.

    edit: I think it helps too to look at the front, side, and back diagrams of muscles, then try to imagine in your brain how they'll look like when you rotate them. Sort of like adding in-betweens in animation. Simple exercises in your mind such as these help.
    I guess drawing isn't the only way to learn drawing. The essential thing is to know what the subject you wish to draw looks like, and drawing is merely a documentation of that knowledge.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to Yang87 For This Useful Post:


  18. #12
    Zazerzs's Avatar
    Zazerzs is offline ....bing me the bore worms Level 7 Gladiator: Samnite
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    866
    Thanks
    449
    Thanked 337 Times in 227 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    start with the bones

    learn how the muscles connect to the bone

    you can learn by drawing the images but the more you investigate and find out what does what and where it attaches the better.

    GL

    "Talent is a word found in the mouth of the lazy to dismiss the hard work of those who have achieved."
    Anatomy Thread
    Sketchbook
    Interested in learning more about color? Read this!
    Fletcher:Color Control
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    1,270
    Thanks
    142
    Thanked 450 Times in 416 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Here's my two cents:

    Learn the ideal proportions and basic shape body construction to get started, and read Successful Drawing and Figure Drawing for All Its Worth. That will give you a basic sense of how to assemble a proportional body.

    After that, or during that, you need a good anatomy book or two as well as deviantart photos of the body. Study a different body part each week (I do arm, head, neck, leg, hands and feet, torso, entire body), and sometimes I spend more than one week on whatever I'm still lacking in. The main key is that you have to spend as much time as necessary but don't try to rush it.

    Do a few copies of each drawing and then try to draw them from your mind, and then see how they show through in photos of that body part, and try to make up poses using what you've learned.

    Just copying is only half (if that) of the battle. Implementing it is what really puts it into your mind.

    I still have a long way to go with anatomy too, but it's fun figuring it all out. Good luck and try to enjoy anatomy as much as you can.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. The Following User Says Thank You to jeremygordon89 For This Useful Post:


  21. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    412
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 52 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    thank you i will check my sketchbook i have some anatomy there

    An Artist strives for Perfection, but never truly wants to find it, Creativity is Controlled Mistakes

    "Carl Anthony Springer"

    "those who ask a stupid question is stupid for a second. but those you do not ask the question is stupid for ever!"


    MY SKETCHBOOK!!

    Kamikazuh Sketchbook


    T i m
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Bucharest, Romania
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 19 Times in 14 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by PieterV View Post
    Don't draw muscle fibers (waste of time)
    I think that might be a good exercise actually (as long as it's done properly of course) - a good dexterity forming exercise which might later be used to develop a type of realistic hatching with lines that wrap around the solid (think some Frazetta pen and ink stuff).

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MrHuffer For This Useful Post:


  24. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    412
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 52 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    ok im studying loomis figure drawing is it useful to draw te manikin frames

    An Artist strives for Perfection, but never truly wants to find it, Creativity is Controlled Mistakes

    "Carl Anthony Springer"

    "those who ask a stupid question is stupid for a second. but those you do not ask the question is stupid for ever!"


    MY SKETCHBOOK!!

    Kamikazuh Sketchbook


    T i m
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    948
    Thanks
    380
    Thanked 253 Times in 135 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The 2 most helpful exersices i know (apart from just copying the plates them selves), are:

    - mass conception
    - ecrocè drawings

    Mass conception is all about simplifying all the complicated shapes of the body in to larger geometric masses. It's best thaught by Bridgeman, kChen here on the forums and Bammes, a german artist. Do a search on Bammes here on the forums, there should be a thread here with some exellent images.

    Ecorcè means 'without skin.' The exercice is to lay a transparent piece of paper over a photograph or a print of an other drawing (refer to 19th century russian or french academic drawings for more accurate surface anatomy).

    On one sheet, draw every bone of the skeleton. The angles and positions of the bones are determined by observing key landmarks on the body. Mass conception is cruicial here, since you'll have to construct the larger masses - the ribcage and the pelvis - in perspective.

    On a new sheet, draw the muscles, emphasizing their origins and insertions. I would recommend doing this in several layers, to fully understand the origins/insertions of every muscle.

    All of this is pretty complicated and it takes alot of time, effort and concentration (not to mention all the books) to get the full overview, so focus on one area at the time.

    Have fun.

    Sketchbook
    Old Sketchbook
    Blog
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    412
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 52 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    thanks alot ill try when i have the time

    An Artist strives for Perfection, but never truly wants to find it, Creativity is Controlled Mistakes

    "Carl Anthony Springer"

    "those who ask a stupid question is stupid for a second. but those you do not ask the question is stupid for ever!"


    MY SKETCHBOOK!!

    Kamikazuh Sketchbook


    T i m
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •