Drawing From Your Imagination Questions
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    Drawing From Your Imagination Questions

    Hi all I have some questions about drawing off the top of your head.

    I'm really into comic book art and I see in comic books there are like a million different intense poses in each comic book.

    Is this usually done with a reference or all off the imagination?

    do the comic book artists typicaly use guides?

    Ask this because my cousin use to have this friend and he could just sit down and just draw all these crazy characters right off the dome and in pen no less.

    for example he could just sit down and draw alien (from the movie alien) in any pose he wanted. and it looked exactly like the real thing.

    so I guess I kinda answer my own question if it is possible.

    But is it possible for anyone to learn to do this?

    Or is it just a rare gift that only a few have?

    This fustrates me because I can draw off the top of my head. I have very strong imagination. But it seems when I try to draw the image I see in my head it comes out differently than the way I see it in my head.

    I certanily can't draw other peoples creations off the top of my head in the exact format and detail as the orginal.

    Any one know how long it takes for something like this develop if it is possible?

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    Heh, what you seem to not understand is that your cousin's friend probably draws all the time AND most likely has a very good understanding of anatomy and perspective. You see, most really good artists weren't just born with an incredible amount talent (okay well, SOME are, but that's another story), it's a skill that they have to hone and practice every day... just like learning how to play a musical instrument.

    After a while, all of the learning and practicing pays off where you don't have to use reference anymore, because everything is ingrained into your brain. So, I suggest that if you want to draw from imagination with little effort, then start learning the fundamentals of drawing and practice them until your arm falls off.

    Btw, some people have a photographic memory, so you're cousin's friend might have that advantage.

    If people knew how hard I worked to get my mastery, it wouldn't seem so wonderful at all. -Michelangelo

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    There is no such thing as being born with a 'rare gift' for art.
    One may have a predisposition for understanding spacial relations, or have dexterous hands, or a photographic memory...
    but none of those things make someone a good artist.

    Potential + Passion = Talent
    Talent + Practice = Skill
    Simple as that.

    - Dan Dos Santos
    www.dandossantos.com
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    i second what DSillustration said about talent

    and to awnser your question yes, a LOT (probably all) comic artist do use (or have used) reference at some point to help themself reach some accuracy in their depictions (for poses, expressions, enviroments, everything).And i think every time you use reference a little bit of the information you've used gets "absorbed", so that over time you build a good visual library that helps drawing from imagination too.Obviously the "bits" are used over a solid basic skill structure that is built with practice and study-form,anatomy,composition, perspective etc

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt22113 View Post
    But it seems when I try to draw the image I see in my head it comes out differently than the way I see it in my head.
    That's because we don't really 'see something in our head' the same way we see things optically.
    To test this for yourself, imagine your own mother's face.
    You think you see it clearly, right?
    OK, now zoom in onto her right eye - how many lashes do you count? Is there a window pane reflection on her eye or a spotlight or a double reflection? What are the wrinkles like exactly, what is the precise form of those folds of flesh?
    .....We fool ourselves that what we 'see' in our mind's eye is like actual vision.
    It is not.
    Think of it rather as the footprint that will be left by the picture once you have made it.

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
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