Request for sculpting advice: Pain relief.
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    25
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 8 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Request for sculpting advice: Pain relief.

    Ok so I just switched to Chavant's medium green and my hand strength isn't where it should be. Any advice on short term pain relief while that's getting corrected so I can keep sculpting while my hands get stronger?

    I don't want to injure myself, but it's annoying not being able to push on the clay hard enough because of the pain in my thumb.

    Any advice? Is it just a "Deal with it till your hands get used to it" thing?

    Thanks !

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    265
    Thanks
    49
    Thanked 125 Times in 70 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Plasteline softens with heat, so you can use a lamp or hair drier to make it easier to work with. You can also submerge small blocks of it into hot water since it is oil based. Just dry it off with a paper towel when taking it out of the water.

    Website Sketchbook

    "If it looks wrong, it is wrong."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Derek the Usurper For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    25
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 8 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I hadn't thought of that, thanks! I've been warming it by kneading it hehe. I almost don't have any thumbprints left and I think blisters are on the way.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    State of denial
    Posts
    115
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 26 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've found that putting plasteline clay in the microwave from 20 seconds to 1 minute softens it up pretty good, too. Although, I wouldn't recommend using the same one that you cook all your food in. LOL

    If people knew how hard I worked to get my mastery, it wouldn't seem so wonderful at all. -Michelangelo

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    265
    Thanks
    49
    Thanked 125 Times in 70 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Scribble King View Post
    I've found that putting plasteline clay in the microwave from 20 seconds to 1 minute softens it up pretty good, too. Although, I wouldn't recommend using the same one that you cook all your food in. LOL
    I wouldn't recommend doing this because it changes the chemical consistency of the clay. Microwaves only heat the liquid in objects, causing oil based things to separate. It's similar to microwaving a piece of cheese and oil secreting out of it.

    Website Sketchbook

    "If it looks wrong, it is wrong."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    39.7,-86.1
    Posts
    1,218
    Thanks
    451
    Thanked 408 Times in 256 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Cut the clay into smaller pieces and knead the pieces one at a time until they soften up. You can use your palms of your hand to roll and flatten the clay. Better than trying to do a big lump at once. I just now finished mixing a big wad of polymer clay that way.

    The other alternative is to get a pasta machine, and you can run the clay through it several times (kneading between the runs) until the clay is soft enough to work with.

    -Mike Cross


    Sculpting Thread|My Website| DeviantArt |My Blog
    -Also on FB and Twitter
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    State of denial
    Posts
    115
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 26 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek the Usurper View Post
    I wouldn't recommend doing this because it changes the chemical consistency of the clay. Microwaves only heat the liquid in objects, causing oil based things to separate. It's similar to microwaving a piece of cheese and oil secreting out of it.
    Really? I never had that problem. Then again, I use NSP, so I'm not sure if the sulfur based stuff would be more susceptible to separating.

    If people knew how hard I worked to get my mastery, it wouldn't seem so wonderful at all. -Michelangelo

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    25
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 8 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I imagine it wouldn't be something immediately noticeable, but might degrade the clay's consistency over time.

    I like the hot water idea for the short term, I just haven't had time to build a warming box yet so I've been warming it with my hands.

    Someone somewhere else suggested a torch, but when I tested that, it liquified the outside while the inside stayed cool-ish. Even feathering the flame had less than satisfactory results. Plus I'd rather not accidentally catch the clay on fire. =\

    @Mad Cross - How soft is the clay you're using? The medium stuff I just got was like trying to knead concrete (Exaggeration) when I got it hehe. Even now when it's at room temperature, doing it in little bits is all I can manage. Working large pieces of it at room temperature would probably take some kind of pneumatic piston. Once it cools off, it goes back to being really stiff.

    Last edited by alexboyer; November 25th, 2009 at 10:38 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    State of denial
    Posts
    115
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 26 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by alexboyer View Post
    The medium stuff I just got was like trying to knead concrete (Exaggeration) when I got it hehe. Even now when it's at room temperature, doing it in little bits is all I can manage. Working large pieces of it at room temperature would probably take some kind of pneumatic piston. Once it cools off, it goes back to being really stiff.
    I use a heat gun (a hair dryer works good, too) to soften up areas on a sculpture in progress. Usually you only need to warm the surface about 1/4 inch deep to work on. If you need to move large amounts of clay around on your sculpture, then building a heat box big enough to hold the entire piece is probably your best bet. Or you could just go back to using softer clay and avoid this whole headache all together. LOL

    If people knew how hard I worked to get my mastery, it wouldn't seem so wonderful at all. -Michelangelo

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    25
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 8 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Nah, I'd rather get used to it and move past it. It's not a headache, just yet another worthy challenge of the art world. =D

    I like the end result the clay gives more than my soft plasteline so I'll just figure out a way that works. Thanks all!!!!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •