Visual Art Fundamentals

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 33
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,900 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Visual Art Fundamentals

    I haven't really run across a clear discussion of what the fundamentals are and why they are important so I thought I'd start this thread.

    Visual art is about communicating - communicating an idea, a concept, a feeling, an emotion, etc. This is certainly the most important aspect of concept art. To communicate effectively one must be clear. To develop clarity in your work you must have a solid understanding of the fundamentals of visual art. Unfortunately, the vast majority of work I see both here and in the related digital art/illustration magazines lacks an understanding of the fundamentals and thus fails to communicate effectively.

    The fundamental principles of visual art as I understand, study and teach them are (in order of importance):

    1) Composition: if it isn't composed well it doesn't matter how well rendered, drawn or how much detail you put in - it all starts with composition.
    2) Drawing: by this I mean accurate shape, form, scale, perspective and the way separate elements relate.
    3) Value: light and shadow - this carries the rest of the image - this is also where 95% of the problems are - maybe more. Good value structure conveys a sense of light which is critical for environments and avoids that muddy, confused/chaotic light source problem which destroys otherwise good concepts.
    4) Color: color is much more subjective/personal than value - it is not as complicated as people make it - the two important keys to color are temperature and saturation.

    That's it. Give your concepts and ideas the effort they deserve. Study these things from life...understanding them will open doors both professionally and personally. I would be interested in what other professionals feel are the fundamentals...maybe you have an expanded list or some insight I've missed.

    Thanks all! Study hard - play hard!

    Jeff

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  4. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,725
    Thanks
    2,677
    Thanked 5,936 Times in 2,388 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I agree. I just think the devil is in the details with what you are saying and when you are starting out it is hard to weed through all the nonsense to get people on the right path. I would also mention there are no shortcuts, no magic brush set for photoshop, no secret program handed out in the backrooms at Sigraph that will replace good decision making and ability.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  6. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    843
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 225 Times in 153 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Visual art includes sculpture or installations also, so unless you clarify it as just 2D you'll have to add other elements such as spacial relationships, form, and scale.

    Clear communication does involve composition but not so much color and drawing. Color may effect people emotionally, but not effect everyone the same way. People who aren't artists can communicate very well. I could describe something without having to show it, or make a rough doodle with stick figures, so that an expert command of color and drawing is not required. If you want to include expert ability or accuracy (such as learn how to draw or paint well) you'll have to include other things like appreciation, elegance, or traditon, which may be hard to qualify.

    Also, value is an element of color, not a separate thing. I would suggest making it the 3rd element by itself and then have value, hue and saturation as part of it.

    David B. Clemons
    Website
    Blog
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,900 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for the comments - and you're right on the money dpaint - it is extremely difficult to cut through the noise and get started in the right direction - which is really why I wanted to start this thread.
    DB - in my experience "visual art" is generally understood to be 2D. I don't want to get into semantics as it would distract from discussing the fundamentals. Value is in fact a separate thing from color, although colors do have relative value. If this were not true Ansel Adams would not be a household name.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,671 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    DB, even though value is a dimension of color, treating it separately is reasonable because it is the only one that can be expressed independently.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    768
    Thanks
    355
    Thanked 583 Times in 203 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You're leaving out the most important thing...creativity

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,900 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good point Amber - thanks! That was an assumed quality...and an underlying part of this thread - if you are a creative, visual person who wants to effectively communicate their ideas - do what it takes to fully realize your vision.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    868
    Thanks
    610
    Thanked 567 Times in 343 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    So, I made a post a while back asking for some compositional help, and I got some great responses, but I was wondering how most of you approach it from scratch. A blow by blow of sitting down with that initial piece of paper and pencil, or psd file so to speak. Personally, I get away with a lot more in photoshop because I can just alter the formatting until I get it "right", whereas in my traditional studies I tend to leap before I look.

    All the other elements you listed seem, to me, much more intuitive and easily learned through day to day observation and application.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,076
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,159 Times in 1,706 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Fundamentals should be ultra basic. Because the ultra basics are much more complicated than they seem. I force myself to think about the bedrock issues.

    So...

    I agree that composition is the most essential thing. But I think unity of expression is the key to composition. Unity of expression is what marries technique, style, detail, composition, drama, character, content, and subtext under one banner of thought.

    And the key to unity of expression is the controlling idea that predicates or determines the technique, style, detail, composition, drama, character, content and subtext.

    The question is then, what do good controlling ideas look like? And how do I come up with them?

    This the million dollar question because this is where talent comes in. And talent, while it can be cultivated, must also be innate.

    One thing to mention here is that the controlling idea must fulfill the requirements of the assignment. In fact, having a goal or assignment is actually very important before starting a work. This guides the process. EDIT: Unless you want to use a different process with more free play in the journey to an endpoint.

    But more generally, my answer for this is read and experience widely, look at lot of other art of all kinds, think, research, know anatomy of not just people, but buildings, animals, landscapes, and clouds.

    And then when the time comes, to have perfect freedom with your thoughts as you imagine your image. To allow your mind to do its work, to pre-visualize as an entity, to the best of your abilities, what will eventually become the work.

    Then, to remember the previz, to jot it down. Then to build it out with the degree of integrity you want or need to see. (Which may require taking photos, looking up ref, or what have you.)

    To recap: Assignment + Educated Mental Freedom --> Thorough Pre-Visualization --> Controlling Idea --> Sketch -->Execution with great Unity of Expression + integrity to the degree desired or required

    Last edited by kev ferrara; June 6th, 2011 at 02:42 PM.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  14. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,900 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good question CK - and true that the other elements are more about careful observation, study and application. Composition is challenging because it is really a "hidden" or underlying principle. The easiest approach or set up is to use the principle of the "eyes of the canvas". These are four points you can easily find by dividing the picture plane in thirds (think tic-tac-toe). Placing key elements at these intersections (not all four though) will provide for a solid composition. These points of intersection roughly approximate the time honored tradition of the Golden Mean developed by the Greeks. Anyway, that's a good starting point and I hope it helps.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  16. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,900 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks Kev - very insightful - I like the idea of "unity of expression". You've touched on much more philosophical and deeper concepts that aren't technical but more intuitive. All very true and well said. That can actually become a problem when an artist's facility/skill become very fine tuned yet they have nothing to say. You have to have a vision first, then the desire to learn your craft well enough to communicate that vision effectively.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #12
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    830
    Thanks
    188
    Thanked 1,385 Times in 331 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    On the question a few posts back of where to discuss value, there'd be no harm at all in focusing on it by itself under number three, and then considering it again under number four as one of the three dimensions of colour - which hopefully we would agree are central to any modern understanding of colour for painters.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    366
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 175 Times in 95 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    A book by Harold Speed, The Practice and Science of Drawing has some very good information on those four things. Having just read it, I highly recommend it to every person interested in drawing and painting.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    843
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 225 Times in 153 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The guy in the back rolling his eyes and shaking his head? That's me. But continue...

    David B. Clemons
    Website
    Blog
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,900 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Keep studying DB - try to work from life as much as possible to develop your awareness and sensitivity to light, values and color - it takes a lot of work but you'll get there!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #16
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    868
    Thanks
    610
    Thanked 567 Times in 343 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Crotchety Texans...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    843
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 225 Times in 153 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Oh, good lord...

    David B. Clemons
    Website
    Blog
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,572
    Thanks
    362
    Thanked 688 Times in 433 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    JeffX99, what do you mean by "composition"?

    Sketchbook

    "Beliefs are rules for action"
    "Knowledge is proven in action."
    "It's use is it's meaning."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,900 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Armando, composition is basically the arrangement of the elements within the picture plane. It is essentially the "foundation" of the image. There are a lot of theories and ideas about composition but because it is sort of a "hidden" aspect of two dimensional art there are few books on it and it can be challenging to study. It isn't as critical in concept art (costume/character design, vehicle design, etc.) since the purpose of concept art is to clearly communicate an idea rather than compose a more traditional work. Thanks for the question - hope that answered it!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,572
    Thanks
    362
    Thanked 688 Times in 433 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for the answer. I believe composition can be summarized as: our way of looking at things.

    Sketchbook

    "Beliefs are rules for action"
    "Knowledge is proven in action."
    "It's use is it's meaning."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,068
    Thanks
    992
    Thanked 2,161 Times in 753 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    I'll let Andrew Loomis do my talking:

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Loomis
    "Expert use of the fundamentals is the only basis there is for learning to draw. These fundamentals can be listed, studied, and carried out in your own way. They are: proportion, anatomy, perspective, values, color, and knowledge of mediums and materials. Each of these can be the subject of infinite study and observation."


    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  27. The Following User Says Thank You to Noah Bradley For This Useful Post:


  28. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,900 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks Noah! Doesn't get any better than that!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  29. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm far from a professional, but in regards to your second point in the fundamentals of visual art, 2) Drawing: by this I mean accurate shape, form, scale, perspective and the way separate elements relate:

    A friend of mine is an art instructor at BYU Idaho and he has come up with a very cool measuring technique that helps you get accurate proportions in your drawing. He uses the technique in all his work and he is a pretty awesome artist. You can take a look at www.accurasee.com and see some of his artwork and some short videos that he has created. He shows step by step how he uses the kit and why it can be useful to any artist. Hope you take a look and good luck!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  30. #24
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,671 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    rtmt5kd, your posts would seem a LOT less spammy if every one didn't have the exact same copypasted paragraph. Starting a new thread with this info might be okay, but carpet bombing identical replies is definitely not.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  31. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    spam

    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    rtmt5kd, your posts would seem a LOT less spammy if every one didn't have the exact same copypasted paragraph. Starting a new thread with this info might be okay, but carpet bombing identical replies is definitely not.
    Hi Tristan. Sorry about the spamlike comments. I'm Bjorn Thorkelson, the creator of the Accurasee System and encouraged some of my students to spread the word...some students might be spreading it a little thick.

    Maybe I'll start a thread...be up front about it.

    Thanks
    Bjorn
    BTW...took a look at your site. Very nice stuff! Keep up the good work.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  32. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Slovakia
    Posts
    4,179
    Thanks
    5,096
    Thanked 2,049 Times in 1,108 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quick question, what's the difference between acurasee and normal graph drawing?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  33. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    653
    Thanks
    124
    Thanked 230 Times in 117 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I made up this list for myself last week.
    It's kind of personal and I loosely translated it from Dutch and rather quickly so it's probably not always very clear. Not to mention full of spell errors, but I'm kind of in a hurry now.

    anyway long list ahead...


    Fundamentals of visual art

    Relationships:

    Relationships
    Contrasts
    Similarity
    Hierarchy
    Porportion


    Composition:

    Relationship to the image area
    Line
    Flats (filled in shapes)
    Shape
    Shape-Identity (pointy, rounded, etc)
    Silhouette and negative spaces
    Orientation
    Balance
    Symetry / Asymetry
    Formal and informal composition
    Cut-offs (part of shape falls outside image area)
    Directness, readability vs ambiguity

    Horizontals
    Verticals
    Diagonals
    Curves
    Tonal use
    Lowkey / Midkey / Highkey tonal setup
    Tonal contrast and tonal range
    Use of color
    Color contrast
    Color harmony


    Line:

    Contour
    Cross-Contour
    Types of line, line-identity (ragged, smooth, textured, uniform, etc)
    Line/Stroke economy (using allot or using little)
    Hierarchy within line (thickness, texture, etc...)
    Sponanity or precision?


    Shape:
    Mechanical / Architectural
    Organical
    Rythm
    Relationships between shapes (contrasts in identity, repetition of shape, etc... tied in to composition)

    Basic shapes such as...
    Triangle
    Square
    Rectangle
    Circle
    Elips
    Polygonal shapes with more sides
    Irregular shapes (noisy, organic, etc)


    Perspective

    Spatial hierarchy
    Overlaps
    Horizon and eye-height
    Vanishing points
    Size
    Perspective based on overlaps (eg. Egyptian art)
    Atmospheric perspective

    Field of view / Cone of vision
    1-point perspective
    2-point perspective
    3-point perspective
    Isometrical perspective
    4-5 Points curvilinear perspective

    Shadowcasting, penumbra, distortions, optical illusions, organical shape construction etc etc...

    Basic shapes such as...
    Cube and beam (right word?)
    Cillinder
    Cone
    Sphere
    Egg
    etc...


    Form

    Relationship between shape and form
    Cross-contour
    Soft vs hard surfaces
    Drawing-trough / Thinking trough
    Construction


    Form and light

    Light adds up
    Planes in relationship to tone
    Local value
    Cast shadow
    Specularity
    Form-light and form-shadow
    Core-shadow and highlight
    Specularity and specular highlights
    Mid-tone
    Reflect-light
    Rimlighting

    Basic lighting on cube, cillinder, cone, sphere...


    Value (tone)

    Tonal scale
    Tonal range
    Tonal range of picture
    Tonal range and tonal hierarchy within an object
    Lightest lights, lights, midtones, darks, darkest darks and their relationship to the tonal range

    Composition based on relationships of light and shadow
    Composition based on relationships between the local values of the objects in the scene.


    Light


    Optica and physics
    The human eye and how it works

    Frequencies within the visible color spectrum
    Extraspectral color

    Primary color...
    Optical primaries
    Psychological primaries

    Additive color mixing
    Substractive color mixing

    Range of a lightsource
    Relationship between distance between light and object and penumbra.


    Color


    Value in relationship to color
    Inherent value of a specific color
    Relationship between form-light and form-shadow and the role color plays in this
    Saturation
    Chroma
    Chroma in relationship to form
    Difference between brightness and lightness

    Temperature...
    Temperature relationships
    Hue
    Warm vs cool color

    Compositorical systems...
    Color contrast
    Color harmony
    Color circulation / Color balance
    Color based on tone (as a working method)
    Hierarchy in color-intensity
    Transitions based on color-value (eg. dark to light as in blue to yellow)
    Transitions based on hue
    Transitions based on chroma / saturation (eg. highest chroma in midtone etc)
    Spatial pulls trough colortemperature
    Color temp within perspective and atmospheric perspective (see above)
    Color variance
    Color variance within white light, color variance within specular highlights

    CIElab vs RGB

    Palette building trough addition of hue
    Palette building trough substraction of hue
    Color palettes and their relationship to the highkey, midkey, lowkey tonal setups
    High chromakey, mid chromakey, low chromakey


    Edges

    4-5 edges principal
    Hierarchy within edges
    Depth of field trough lenzes
    Blur and motion blur


    Texture

    Texture approached from materials used (painterly approach)
    Texture approached from surface of object (photographic approach)

    Texture trough tonality
    Texture trough hue and color temperature

    Coarse vs fine texture
    Texture by papergrain vs texture by brushstrokes


    Simplification and abstraction

    Abstraction based on contour
    Abstraction based on form
    Abstraction based on movement
    Abstraction based on light and shadow shapes
    Abstraction based on local tones and colors


    Dynamics


    Rythm
    Contrast and exageration
    Caricaturisation
    Proportions
    Exagerated perspective
    Diagonals
    Light-play
    Direct vs difuse lighting
    Mixing the above to into a hybrid approach?
    Emphasising the materials used
    Keeping the directness/sketchyness alive
    Cut outs (having something only partially within the picture frame)


    Storytelling


    Fantasy vs reality
    Irony and provocation
    Conceptualism and philosophy
    Playing out contrasts
    Climax and anticlimax
    Style-figures

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  34. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to PieterV For This Useful Post:


  35. #28
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Frankfort, IN
    Posts
    245
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 57 Times in 43 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by TASmith View Post
    Quick question, what's the difference between acurasee and normal graph drawing?
    A straight grid system tends to put your head in autopilot from single square to single square, with hopes that when the grid is removed it all stands cohesive and reads correctly.

    From what I see, the Acurasee program kind of combines a grid and sight size. By just using a grid, you are prone to chop things up into small units and not really see the relationships that exist. By using a plumb line, you start seeing how things line up and begin the journey from what you think you see to what is physically there.

    The key is that without the grid on your drawing surface, can you judge the distances that exist on the grid that IS on your subject matter. The more you practice the guess and measure method, the more accurate you will eventually become at judging distances as well as noticing places where things line up and form relationships to the whole.

    @PieterV - You have quite a list of fundamental study here. I hope this thread spawns some activites for individual/group study. I am just kind of tossing around in my head how a CHOW/COW/EOW type activity look like if the base point was to work on this list of fundamentals. I am not even sure it COULD be done, or if there would even be that much interest in it. If nothing else, its a fantastic checklist the next time I feel overwhelmed and do not know where to begin.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  36. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Difference between Accurasee and gridding

    Quote Originally Posted by TASmith View Post
    Quick question, what's the difference between acurasee and normal graph drawing?
    Well, let me take a shot here...when we use the gridding system, we're basically copying what's in squares. Now, I have no problem with that, but we're not learning to see the entire picture. The Accurasee system is simply a measurement system that helps to find "landmarks" and avoid overall distortion.

    It's not some kind of magical system which is going to help you draw the perfect eye, but it will help you to find the right spot to place the eye and help you to make the eye the right size in relation to the rest of the head. The fact is, the eye we draw may be totally lame, but at least it's the right size and in the right place. Finding the correct placement for features is half the battle.

    In my opinion, both the grid system and the Accurasee system have there place, but they are totally unique. For one, The Accurasee system can be used from life. Also, one does not make a grid on their paper using my measurement system. In a nutshell, the Accurasee System is used to help the artist count off unit measurements and align important features. That's all...the rest is up to the artist.

    If your interested, there are two brand new videos that can be found:
    http://www.accurasee.com/demo.html

    You can see some of my work here:
    http://www.gbjorn.com/

    As with any method, it's not for everyone, but this system has helped me to draw more accurately...even when I'm not using the system. It's also helped many of my students understand what it actually takes to draw accurately...measurements and alignments. The fact is you can do these things without Accurasee (using a pencil to measure and find alignments,)...it's just harder to be precise.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  37. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Accurasee Explanation

    Quote Originally Posted by Shehaub View Post
    A straight grid system tends to put your head in autopilot from single square to single square, with hopes that when the grid is removed it all stands cohesive and reads correctly.

    From what I see, the Acurasee program kind of combines a grid and sight size. By just using a grid, you are prone to chop things up into small units and not really see the relationships that exist. By using a plumb line, you start seeing how things line up and begin the journey from what you think you see to what is physically there.

    The key is that without the grid on your drawing surface, can you judge the distances that exist on the grid that IS on your subject matter. The more you practice the guess and measure method, the more accurate you will eventually become at judging distances as well as noticing places where things line up and form relationships to the whole.

    @PieterV - You have quite a list of fundamental study here. I hope this thread spawns some activites for individual/group study. I am just kind of tossing around in my head how a CHOW/COW/EOW type activity look like if the base point was to work on this list of fundamentals. I am not even sure it COULD be done, or if there would even be that much interest in it. If nothing else, its a fantastic checklist the next time I feel overwhelmed and do not know where to begin.
    Wow...I'm impressed. You totally get it. Did you watch the video?

    Geez, I came across your post after I'd posted my response, and to be honest with you, I don't thick that I could have made your point any more clear.

    Thanks

    Last edited by thorkster; November 28th, 2009 at 02:01 AM. Reason: forgot additional info
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 32

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook