3D paintovers..tips, tricks, info?
 
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  1. #1
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    3D paintovers..tips, tricks, info?

    Hey all,

    Im mainly a 3D artist but Ive seen some cool paintovers that made the image a very nice illustration.
    Ive done a bit of digital painting but Im not very familiar with it (mainly cleanup and compositing work for 3D).

    Id really like to learn how to do paintovers but I havent found much on the net about learning. Can anyone point me in the right direction, website links, tutorials, tips or tricks? Im sure there are probably different methods, Im just not sure where to start.

    Is it basically sampling the colors of an image and painting overtop?

    Thanks in advance!

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by AA-ron View Post
    Is it basically sampling the colors of an image and painting overtop?
    That would be my guess, but since I haven't done it either, there may be better ways to do it. There are a few filters in photoshop like Dry Brush, Watercolor, Sponge, etc. that may help with making the image more "painterly", as well. Just experiment around with it, I'm sure you'll find something that works to your liking.

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    u 3d guys are lucky, i wish i can do it an paint over all my images with perfect perspective.... and symetry, maybe i should learn

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    Quote Originally Posted by riceface View Post
    u 3d guys are lucky, i wish i can do it an paint over all my images with perfect perspective.... and symetry, maybe i should learn
    Making some boxes in a 3D program to set up your perspective is no harder than stacking some wooden blocks on your table and drawing them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek the Usurper View Post
    Making some boxes in a 3D program to set up your perspective is no harder than stacking some wooden blocks on your table and drawing them.
    uhhh im not talkin about simple perspective.. im talkin complex things, characters monsters in perfect perspective from any angle.. even ultra hard warped angles..

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    Question

    Rice, why not go and learn basic 3d?

    http://www.blender.org/
    http://www.wings3d.com/
    http://www.gimp.org/

    Google for demos of most of the main 3d apps, they all have free tutorials a Google away
    3DTotal, CGtalk, they are knee deep in tutorials, go have a play with the tech.

    Seriously, it's not the miracle solution you're hoping for.

    The software and tutorials are basically free, the ball is now firmly in your court.

    Last edited by Flake; November 12th, 2009 at 12:08 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by riceface View Post
    uhhh im not talkin about simple perspective.. im talkin complex things, characters monsters in perfect perspective from any angle.. even ultra hard warped angles..
    It's not any easier to learn how to sculpt detailed characters in order to use them for paint-overs. If anything it will increase the time it takes to finish the project, beyond what it would have taken if you had just figured out the character perspective in your drawing.

    The only scenario I can think of where it would be beneficial, would be in a graphic novel where you have to draw the same character over and over again in different poses and perspectives. I think the main use for paint-overs of 3D lies in mechanical and architectural objects which are generally faster to model in low detail than to draw from scratch.

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    AA-ron: going from a 3d image to "paintover" still requires knowledge of form and color unless you want to apply a filter in photoshop and be done (very obvious in most cases its filtered).

    The main thing you need is an idea /composition
    Then find yourself some reference of what you want it to look like.

    riceface: 3d isn't some magical media , you still need to know how shapes work before you can make a believable model/sculpt and not some kind of blob

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    Edited, because my original post could be read as me having a pop at 3d monkeys, when actually I think a course in basic 3d could benefit most people..

    Last edited by Flake; November 12th, 2009 at 12:06 PM.
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  12. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek the Usurper View Post
    It's not any easier to learn how to sculpt detailed characters in order to use them for paint-overs. If anything it will increase the time it takes to finish the project, beyond what it would have taken if you had just figured out the character perspective in your drawing.
    Agreed. If you're going to make a quality sculpt of a basic character (wearing T-shirt and jeans for instance), it's probably going to take you at least a week of fulltime work. And if it needs a detailed costume, it's not uncommon that it will take a full month, or even longer. And this is all assuming that you're already a competent modeler, ofcourse.

    That said, if you just want to figure out perspective, it could be beneficial to build a base manikin. It would be pretty much like a wooden drawing manikin, but you'll have the advantage of giving it the proportions you need and you can give it a much wider range of motion than those useless wooden things. It would take a good while to build, but at least you can use it again and again. Also, once you have it, it's not too difficult to create variants with different proportions.

    You could also prepare a base head for sculpting, which will allow you to do quick sculpts of character heads. Still, even a rough head sculpt from a premade base could easily take an hour or two, so it's still slow compared to drawing. It's very useful if you want to keep a character consistant in multiple drawings, though, and you can set up a lighting scene with it as well.

    And lastly, if you model regularly, you'll probably have some generic materials laying around that you can reuse or repurpose. If you already have a detailed sculpt of a generic hero, or a generic hot chick, that may be enough to quickly throw together a scene. But ofcourse, the less "tailored" the 3d scene is, the more you will have to do in 2d.

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