Self-portrait
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Self-portrait

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Self-portrait

    Here's a self-portrait I did for my portfolio to apply to a school. What do y'all think? It was hard for me to take a proper photo of it; sorry about that.

    Thanks.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by waru; November 7th, 2009 at 11:18 AM. Reason: Attached file properly
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    2,101
    Thanks
    685
    Thanked 1,013 Times in 690 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hmmm it seems like you've got the shading and highlights down pretty well, but it looks really, really rough. This could be a style thing, but to me it looks rather more like unorganised almost child-like scribbling. Blend your shaded areas, make them look smooth like actual skin. Also, study your eyes and nose carefully. The underside of your nose should be more defined and the right eye (your left) needs to be darker I think.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Lhune For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I don't know if you can call it style, but my realistic drawings are usually scribbly. I'll try to work on that. It's kinda hard with hard lead graphite pencils (what this was). Thanks.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    2,101
    Thanks
    685
    Thanked 1,013 Times in 690 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Well then find yourself a softer lead to work with . HB or 2B should be just fine. Don't press the pencil down too hard, start off drawing very softly then gradually press down harder to get a good feel for the pencil and what kind of lines it will produce. Fill up area's by going over them again and again, not by trying to scribble them full at once. Once you get to the final stages of the drawing you can use a far softer lead to make the darkest shades.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Lhune For This Useful Post:


  7. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    2,903
    Thanks
    254
    Thanked 1,194 Times in 869 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you want some good tips on drawing faces, which you can apply to your self portrait work, try this site. I found it pretty useful when I was working on mine.

    It helps a lot to really study the face and think of it in terms of shapes and planes. So you've got rounded shapes for the cheeks, a slope on the upper lip, depressions for the eye cavities, and so forth. I personally prefer to describe them with line, and vary the weight depending on shadow (usually on the bottoms of the forms, like the underside of the nose), but you can certainly develop your shading more. You've got a pretty good handle on proportion it seems, so what you should be concentrating on is describing your forms.

    The Nezumi Works Sketchbook - Now in progress

    My online portfolio

    Bloggity blog

    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Nezumi Works For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    OK, thanks. I'll try to work on something more smooth.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    367
    Thanks
    103
    Thanked 106 Times in 57 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Try doing longer lines as well, I see you filling whole areas with small pencil strokes. Try using longer strokes. The eye is a little too big as well. You should study eye construction on the site Nazumi pointed out. The overall proportions seem ok, though. And that is good.

    Keep on studying.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to cl0aked For This Useful Post:


  12. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You could try using a tortillion or some other blending tool to smooth out the shading as well. The eyes seem a little too big too. But besides those things, everything seems to be good so far.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Cool, I never knew that tool was called a tortillion.

    So proportions and highlights OK, but need to work on practical technique (lines and smoothing). Got it. And the eyes are big. It's cause I like eyes I guess.

    Thanks for the reference site, too.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #10
    Janos's Avatar
    Janos is offline Fool me once shame on you. Fool me twice shame on Fu! Level 10 Gladiator: Equites
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tübingen, Germany
    Posts
    1,698
    Thanks
    39
    Thanked 570 Times in 492 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I like it, its just the nose which disturbs me. Just doesn't look right. Try studying some nose images!

    Cheers

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Janos For This Useful Post:


  16. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Haha. My nose is kind of crooked, but the nose was actually hard for me, too. Thanks.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    53
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    For more organized pencil-work I would recommend a hatching exercise.
    Basically you take a sheet of lined paper and you fill it with hatching, trying to to use the lines already on the sheet as an orient. Try pressing harder and softer to see how the material works, try achieving sharper and softer transitions. Instead of hatching with individual lines do a continuous tight zig-zag kind of thing.

    Fill a couple of sheets like that and then try drawing something simple. You could even start with a matchbox - though I can see you've really got an eye for values here even without too much training under your belt (I'm still wrestling with it myself after already some time of active study !) - hatch in the direction of the shapes. You'll get a hang of it when you work on rounder objects, fruit or a ball or something.

    So: anatomy, a great amount of studies (I mean actual blood-and-sweat drawing hours, not theory, which is also important but can't ever replace practice!), symmetry and form (goes hand in hand with anatomy) and transitions between values - sharp and soft edges.

    Good luck !

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to Gaspard For This Useful Post:


Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •