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  1. #40
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    Sorry to push this back up but humility is ok in doses. I think an artist needs confidence with a touch of ego. I feel a lot of my work is pretty cool and some not so cool, but I go in to every painting or illustration with the thought that this will be a great work. The struggle of the process is where doubts come in but that is the great joy of doing this stuff. The unknown in each project is what keeps me hiking over the next rise. (wow, poetic) But never in that struggle do I lose the sense of my ability to make the next mark the "one". Perfection is overrated. Flaws and the unique highlight great beauty.

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  4. #41
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    My pet theory about this is as follows, please keep in mind that it's a pet theory, not based on hard scientific data.

    Self satisfaction and ego are two different beasts. Self satisfaction is based on your own appreciation of what you do and ego is based on how you compare yourself with others/deal with outside appreciation. They are linked, but not the same thing. For exemple, someone might be very happy of what they do, but they might feel oppressed or misunderstood by others. Or someone might have super low self esteem and think people are nuts for praising him.

    I found this awesome article yesterday that explains why people are so bad at self-evaluation, it's lenghty but instructive and intricate:
    http://www.apa.org/journals/features/psp7761121.pdf

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  5. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qitsune View Post
    I found this awesome article yesterday that explains why people are so bad at self-evaluation, it's lenghty but instructive and intricate:
    http://www.apa.org/journals/features/psp7761121.pdf
    ...That's really informative... tho just skimming it seems to read as "People who are stupid are too stupid to realize that they are stupid."

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  6. #43
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    Enjoy the process but make intelligent decisions.

    I hope I don't sound like I'm trying to make a pretentious one liner.

    Form, Form, Form, Form, Form, Form, Form, Form, Form, Form.
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  7. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by zwarrior View Post
    my idea of perfect is, i think, something that should be avoided.

    Here's my idea of perfect painting:

    Do you pros actually ever feel you've done great work?

    apparently those guys didnt paint this from a photograph or a live model, this person doesnt exist, and this is a painting. Im very impressed by their hard work but Im not drooling over it like I would to paintings that really inspire me, the ones where the artists used their unique "flaws" to bring life and character to their work.
    WTF!!! How is this a painting? Seriously. I looked at the WIPS and it didn't even look like it was real.

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  8. #45
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    I am not a pro. I hope to be at some point in the future, but I am not as of yet.

    But even still, I've been happy with some of my work. I don't really see the point in doing it if you're just going to feel like shit about it afterwords. I've used personal pieces as desktop wallpapers and things of that nature before.

    When I approach a painting, I approach it wanting to do something cool. Wanting to portray a cool idea. If I do that, and it looks interesting, well then there you go. I'll always feel like I can do better, but the day I stop enjoying the work is the day I find something better to do.

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  9. #46
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    I can bet the pros out there hit such a damn plateau skill wise that they would have real hard time getting better. You start with leaps and bounds, but the better you get the more of a style develops and the harder it is to go above and beyond without outside judgement and guidance.

    Last edited by Kraus; December 18th, 2009 at 01:30 PM.
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  10. #47
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    I bet they don't but I also bet that YOU wouldn't see the difference. There is a point where there is improvement but it's slower and more subtle, and you can look at the piece and think it's awesome but not know why it's better than another piece unless you have had extensive art training yourself.

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  11. #48
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    True, art training does keep tabs on self-progress, but i think knowing is half the battle. The other half is breaking from the refined muscle memory many artists develop through time, and taking the action to improve.

    My theory is that the better an artist gets skill wise, the harder it is to break from the usual strokes and techniques they have engrained their art with. And that's the plateau i'm talking about...Especially when it comes to concept art, where so many more factors get introduced, unlike life drawing where one is trying to be able to replicate what the eye sees as close as possible.
    The plateau can come in many forms too: subject, composition, colour choices, etc..
    I'm not a pro yet, but that doesn't discredit me, i know where i am and where i want to be. From there on i'll make damn sure to take a break from art so i can come back after awhile and see if i can get off the plateau.

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  12. #49
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    Dave and Baron_Impossible have stated it very eloquently But yeah, usually when I finish a piece I'm really proud of it. Some of them a few days later, I no longer feel that way about, and some I continue to really like.

    I'm happy with almost everything I do, if I'm not, it's not done. I used to be okay with turning in stuff I didn't really like, but honestly I think that unless the deadline is crazy, that's simply lazy.

    Liking something you did doesn't mean you can't take crits on it or do better next time either

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  14. #50
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    Hrm, it's rather nifty to see all the responses here. Not a professional either, but I also feel slightly less crazy now, as I also go through the roller coaster of liking/disliking a piece both during creation, and after. I don't think I've ever actually settled on a view of any of mine to this point.

    Though I'll also say, after deciding to move on there's an hour of calm and then for hours directly following that it feels like I'm a masochist, finding every flaw possible. It's useful in that I think it helps immensely for the next piece... but yeah, ouch.

    I'll definitely agree in the view of the endless journey, there's so much out there and in each individuals heart and mind that I don't think it could ever end, and why would anyone want it to? My goal in the end is to create things that share and evoke in others, just like a piece I found yesterday which I proceeded to share with everyone nearby. If I can do that even a little, I'd be happy.

    One last thing though, is that pondering this I have this mental image of working on a masterpiece, something like a culmination of all the study and work in a lifetime coming together into a distilled piece as close to perfection as could be attained by that life... and moments before completion, a few brush strokes to go... heart attack. *cough*

    "I have learnt silence from the talkative, toleration from the intolerant, and kindness from the unkind; yet strange, I am ungrateful to these teachers." - Kahlil Gibran


    Sketchbook: Critique greatly appreciated =)
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  15. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kraus View Post
    My theory is that the better an artist gets skill wise, the harder it is to break from the usual strokes and techniques they have engrained their art with.
    One of the art instructors I've met through school has painted photo realistic portraits and has been working since the 60s so I picked his brain as much as I could. His solution to the advance and hold problem was to constantly change style and medium whenever he reached a point where he felt he was comfortable with what he was doing. It sounds like a method that makes perfect sense to me. I think when an artist begins to improve it's because they're finding solutions to various problems in creating form etc. After they have a skill set of solutions they're now comfortable with their method so completely changing the method, like switching from pencil to stick, or a different shading method or whatever forces the artist to develop new tools all over again. It means more challenge and more bad drawings but in the end it worked for him.

    Of course working professionally isn't the time to experiment. I imagine if a client is paying for the style in your portfolio that's what you'd have to deliver so the development would have to be done on your own time. Something like that for a professional artist would require a great deal of dedication. He or she would have to work when they're not working.

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  16. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by slig665 View Post
    Of course working professionally isn't the time to experiment..
    Oh i disagree. Every professional piece would be an experiment, assuming it's not so mind numbing that you just wish to get it over with.

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