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Thread: Sketchtastic!

  1. #31
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    nice studies keepem commin


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  3. #32
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    Heya

    For making scales, there isn't really a quick way to go about it, other than to set up a grid and then using it to guide how you make each scale. Hope that helps.

    Keep those studies up.
    Edward

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by element1988 View Post
    This might be a stupid question but... How would i do that?
    Gestures are quick sketches of poses and their rhythm. You drawn them anywhere between 15 and 120 seconds, I think 30-60 seconds is best to get into it. And they're great for loosening up before getting into more serious drawings.

    Check out Glenn Vilppu anatomy books, he focuses foremost on gesture before getting into the figure.

    ALSO: This is a great tool to start with, Pose Maniacs timed gestures.

  5. #34
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    thx for the help guys and man i didn't know pose maniacs had this tool lol imma have some fun with this tyty
    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

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  6. #35
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    Ok so ive been doing them 30 second poses for about an hour now, i still cant do anything but scribbles in that time lol. Is this what im suppose to do? will this help me if i keep doing it?

    Anyway i did like 200 pages of sketches but im only gunna show these 4, 1. because im too lazy to scan them all lol and 2. because i don't see the point in scanning 200 pages of scribbles
    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

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  7. #36
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    Day 2 of the 30 sec poses and i really don't feel like im learning anything

    Well here they are... nonsense scribbles
    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

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  8. #37
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    I have some advice about your scribbles.
    Start with 1 minute poses until you get more comfortable with the idea, then move on to 30 second poses after a few sessions.
    SLOW DOWN. Look at the pose, understand it, understand its planes and the way its form occupies space.
    Draw your understanding of the reference, like what you were doing with the velociraptor. Don't just rush into copying. Make the poses as long as you need to start off with. Then push yourself with time.
    This also relates to Bridgman. (I'm half-guessing that some of these studies you're doing are from Bridgman.) He's all about forms and blocks and planes. His writing is a bitch to understand, but if you realize that what he's doing is showing you the way that the human form is constructed on a basic level, then you can extract very valuable studies from him. To do gestures, you need to know the form that is gesturing. If you're gesturing a spine, a torso, a head, and a pelvis (as simple as you can get), you need to know how the forms of those body parts occupy space. The truth of how they are constructed is in the teachings of Bridgman. I strongly recommend Marshall Vandruff's streaming class for a full lesson on Bridgman and form vs. anatomy if CA still has it On Demand. It is invaluable. If they aren't offering it anymore, I suggest finding another teacher who can take you through Bridgman.

    Now here's a challenge for you: once you build up your understanding of form (doesn't even have to be by much), do some Posemaniacs sketches, but rotate them in your head. Draw the same pose you see, but from a very different angle. That way, you force yourself to apply your knowledge and practice manipulating it.

    Practice is fairly useless unless you are applying your knowledge. Study. Think while you draw every single time and your skills will improve much faster than if you just draw.

    P.S.: The studies of anatomy and form should be learned in tandem.

    Hope this all helps.

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  10. #38
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    thx for the great advice. I will give your challenge a try at some point, it sounds really hard XD
    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

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  11. #39
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    I think it's important early on to flex your mental muscle on what gesture should mean for you. This is my personal approach but I think it's a neccecary angle to atleast think about.

    Think of gesture first in terms of action, it's more about what you feel than about what you actually see.

    If you have no experience with gesture scetches at all, spend some time looking at gestures and copying it with your own body, trying to express what they are, after a while look at gestures then mentally feel what those gestures could feel like, even what those people could be feeling having that gesture or moving like that, you might find your body slightly moving to relate, that's normal.

    That should start something off in the way you draw gesture lines. The S curves of action, how you relate on paper to what you feel in what you see. Your abillity to grab character "threads" with your mind and work with them.

    Seeing is more like a feedback loop to make sure you keep things true to appearance.

    Gesture is about capturing essential action first, to have the communication of what you are looking at down on paper.

    It's hard to get the idea behind gesture looking at posing models as they are all kinda dead poses regardless of what position they take on. To get the correct idea behind gesture it would have been better to start with freeze framed action shots of ballerina's, boxers, etc.. etc..

    It's about the force of action and communicating that. If you understand that you can move onto studio type poses and capture gesture in terms of bodily positions of limbs etc. action poses ususally look at ellements of emotion, surprize, elegance, grace, aggression, motion, body language etc in the studio you might look at stuff like, squareness, roundness, rythm of the pose individual character most of them might have "dead weight poser feel to them though" usually what happens is the artist injects personal distortions of life into the drawings intentionally or accidentally because of the way they felt or the mind generating some dream distortion to escape the boredome and these end up looking great compared to a photo of a model posing drifting into a daydream while people draw.

    As you advance with gesture it combines with the idea of capturing critical information, that's personal in that you prioritize what pieces of information is important to get.

    What gesture are used for is to have a snap shot, or an artist recording of someting he saw that he or she can work from to create more completed scetches but having retained the original gesture/action/communication/feeling/idea/energy/memory.
    ----------------------------------
    Scetchbook: View the exhibitionist's stuff.

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  13. #40
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    zaorr: wow man, that actually made a lot of sense to me lol i think im starting to understand
    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

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  14. #41
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    60 sec sketches, a little better then the 30 secs ones lol, but i just started using painter 10, and i really like how i can hide the pallets and sketch while having the 30 second pose app running. its a lot of fun. oh and i think im starting to understand rhythms.
    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

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  15. #42
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    I'm still messing around with painter and have no idea what im doing, but im having a lot of fun figuring it out lol. this is like some random pose that i thought i would shade but then realized i didn't know how in painter, so this is the end result lol
    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

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  16. #43
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    Something you may want to do in Painter is make a simple brush with a circle dab (a variant on the Flat Color brush, found in the pens section) and make its opacity pressure sensitive. I find that to be a good basic brush, and it's probably the brush I use most often. Keep in mind that opacity in Painter is different from opacity in Photoshop. Painter work with dabs. That one image that the engine just repeats. Opacity changes the transparency of each individual dab. Having a brush with opacity sensitive to pressure is going to help with rendering immensely.

    In case you don't know, to make a variant on the Flat Color brush:

    Open a new file and make an image of some kind. Anything. Make sure it's on the canvas layer.->
    Select->
    All->
    Up in the top right, on the bush bar, there's a triangle. Click it.->
    Capture brush category->
    Name it.->
    Pens Category->
    Flat Color->
    Triangle again.->
    Copy variant->
    Select your new category.->
    Go to your new brush if it doesn't take you there.->
    You can either triangle, then Show Brush Creator (this may cause Painter to spaz out), or->
    Window->
    Brush controls->
    Show General.

    Once there, change the Opacity expression to pressure.

    Poses look a lot better. Keep at it. Keep thinking.

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  18. #44
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    wow thx man this should really help out
    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

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  19. #45
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    Thanks 4 drop in your SB is cool too) hardwork is da best )

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