Start to finish- the process???
 
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  1. #1
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    Start to finish- the process???

    Ok. this is where i'm having quite a few issues. The process in which something goes from start to finish- and all the little bits in between.

    Just to clarify something, i'm having trouble with digitally painting too- i almost have to have an outline of some sort to at least start off, then i can shade and colour. but its never quite the same as what you other TALENTED people do.

    So, help me out here! Whats your process? Ideas, roughs, painting (HOW???), finishing touches, etc. I seriously need some guidance.

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  3. #2
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    I'm having the same problem. It's pretty hard to start, but even when you start and things start to shape up a bit I get a bit lost.

    I also get lost when I see a very good finished drawing. I actually get discouraged.

    Now I know drawing is hard but at the same time is easy. YOu just have to start from the begining and work your way up. I'm talking here about the drawing process.

    So, any help on this?

    How do you people start? What is the first thing you do? After you have your shapes, (or whatevar you have) what do you do?

    Thanks

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    Wow, talk about a tall order. I'm sure nobody here is going to write an essay on how they make a painting from start to finish... it would simply be too much work to do so and be very, very long.

    My suggestion would to go to YouTube and look up "speed painting" videos, which may help you see the many different approaches to painting that people take.

    Hope that helps.

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    Go draw.

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    Tristan Elwell
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    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

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  8. #7
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    search a little harder there are plenty of vids, tuts and even a few books out there that show examples of peoples work-flows, find one you like and try it out. Even if you don't stick with that particular style you'll learn something along the way.

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    hahaha, very sharp.

    yeah, besides the upcoming Foster lecture, browsing tutorials would be a good place to start. The reason that it's such a difficult question to answer is not necessarily because the answer is so complex but because there are so many different answers. Even artists who use similar methods might have very different processes.

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    The basic illustration process is:
    1 - Explore composition through a series of thumbnails (postage stamp size) - pushing yourself to do 20 is a good excercise
    2 - Develop more promising thumbnails as small roughs, in ratio to final painting size (6x8=18x24 for example) with slightly more attention to perspective, masses, scale, etc.
    3 - Work out the lighting through value studies
    4 - Explore mood and atmosphere with color studies
    5 - Work out a final drawing to size with full detail and value
    6 - Paint it

    That's pretty much it - from start to finish. Go to Donato Giancola's site to see this process in action. Also Jim Gurney's new book "Imaginitive Realism" is an excellent book that shows how it's done. It isn't really about talent or secret techniques - it comes down to just hard work.

    Great question! Have fun!

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  12. #10
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    THIS is an amazing tutorial for beginners and digital painting. Read it and do the fruit painting just as it describes, very helpful.

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  13. #11
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    Everybody is a little different but generally I start from the big idea and refine to the details.
    Here is an example, total time for this is three hours size is 11x14 inches for the sketch the rest is digital.
    I start with my idea and sketch it out in value only(in this case pencil)
    I then move to color and block in big shapes and get a sense of my lighting.
    Refine the shapes adjust composition and add detail.
    Finished painting
    This is rough, but everything I do is the same approach, start with the big idea and tones, direction of light and viewpoint. Refine down to finish.Hope this helps. THe problem most beginners have is they are rendering the fingernails before they know what direction the light is coming from. This is wrong. If you block in with big flat tones and be accurate with your color and value the detail is just icing on the cake but all the detail in the world will not give your image a strng sense of light or good color and value.

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  14. #12
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    A basic illustration process is:
    1 - Explore composition through a series of thumbnails (postage stamp size) - pushing yourself to do 20 is a good excercise
    2 - Develop more promising thumbnails as small roughs, in ratio to final painting size (6x8=18x24 for example) with slightly more attention to perspective, masses, scale, etc.
    3 - Work out the lighting through value studies
    4 - Explore mood and atmosphere with color studies
    5 - Work out a final drawing to size with full detail and value
    6 - Paint it
    fixed. though there are aspects of that which are similar to my own process, it's certainly not the same. The "paint it" part is another process entirely, which also will have vastly different correct answers. There's no one answer to this unless you want to get so general that it won't help anybody

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  16. #13
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    It takes a while to find a process that really works for you. I've read tons of tutorials, seen demos from very talented people, read books, and such. The techniques and methods that I have witnessed belonged solely to those people. It's great to try someone else's method but it's usually not something that you can permanently apply to your own art. In school I would always approach a painting differently sometimes incorporating what was suggested to me from other artists. Sometimes I would just dive in and work intuitively and stumble upon something that really worked. Like anything else, your process and method will take a little time to develop.

    There is a ton of information already here in the forums. Just look around.

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  17. #14
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    Thanks for the correction Dave - you're right, there are of course as many approaches as there are artists - but that is also so general as to not be helpful. Donato Giancola has an excellent series of examples of exactly this process in action which is why I suggested the link.

    In general though, I do think that the majority of classical illustrators use that type of approach. I think a lot of artists just getting started don't understand that a piece has to be worked out and developed - they tend to only see something finished (even if it is only a study or quick sketch) and think you just jump right in there. Also, different media can have different approaches - I approach my digital work entirely differently than my traditional for example.

    So yes, on the one hand it is a very personal journey of discovery, at the same time it pays to study and understand how the top professionals, both contemporary and historical, practice their craft.

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