Art: Sculpture Texturing
 
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  1. #1
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    Sculpture Texturing

    Can anyone comment on the best and most popular techniques of texturing sculptures? Materials and application?
    Thanks.

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  3. #2
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    rocks are always good, you can go out and grab a variety of different ones... sand paper... different textured fabrics... umm...find some skins of reptiles... just look around at any hardware store...for materials...

    to get reverse permanent textures.. take an imprint on clay and pore a mold of the clay...

    peace
    -mike

    -Deth Jester
    "Live each day like you will die tommorow, and dream like you will live forever..."
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  4. #3
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    try a sponge

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  5. #4
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    I find crumpled aluminum foil works great for ground and rock texturing. (For me anyhow)

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  6. #5
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    It depends on what sort of texture your after. What I use to get some light bumpy texture is to rake the clay and then apply turpenoid to blend it. Depending on how hard you scrape the clay, you can get a nice semi-rough texture. Also, a alcohol torch can give you interesting textures by heating the clay and letting it run a bit. You can get some nice organic bumps that way.

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  7. #6
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    If you want a "warty" or "scaly" surface, build your own tools from super sculpey or FIMO by taking a lunp of "old" clay and punching in holes with any tool you like (eg. pens, brushes etc). burn this and then press it on the soft surface you want to texture.

    I can post a picture of my self-made tools if you like.

    Jester

    Imagination is intelligence having fun!

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  8. #7
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    do it i wanna c :chug:

    grrr roawl!
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  9. #8
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    If you are trying to get skin textures try using texture stamps. You can make a stamp by painting liquid latex on any textured surface like old luggage, a rock, an orange peel, anything with a surface that appeals to you. Once the rubber is dry peel it from the surface and you have a nagative stamp of that texture. This stamp can be pressed intot he clay randomly texturing large areas quickly.

    If you want a raised texture like tiny bumps or warts try using a sponge to stipple on a few layers of Acrylic Gel Medium. This will give a very interesting skin surface.

    For warts and scaly bumps try melting some of your clay (if it is oil clay you are using) and mixing it 30/70 with alcohol. This can be built up on the surface with a brush to make lots of litttle bumpy areas. Stan Winston's crew used this technique for the skin of many of the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park. The alcohol just lets the clay stay liquidy longer than if you tried to paint it on just melted.

    Scott

    Scott Spencer
    www.scottspencer.com

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  10. #9
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    Sorry, I had some troubles with my computer, so this took me a while. Here are the tools I made and use:

    Sculpture Texturing

    and without a flash:

    Sculpture Texturing

    Hope this helps.

    Jester

    Imagination is intelligence having fun!

    Jester's Sketchbook

    Portfolio web site
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  11. #10
    smellybug Guest
    I'll be showing you guys how to make great texture stamps in my tut'. I'll cover latex and siliputty stamps. It's easy. Keep watching.

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