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  1. #16
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  3. #17
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    Thanks for taking the time to post this thread. As someone starting to get into oils it's great to see these process shots from someone who knows a considerable amount about painting. Cheers!

  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by aefx View Post
    Thanks for taking the time to post this thread. As someone starting to get into oils it's great to see these process shots from someone who knows a considerable amount about painting. Cheers!
    Yeah, I'm starting oils too so this is a great help, thanks heaps mr whitaker!
    I'm trying to find as much knowledge about oils so I don't waste a whole lot of time and paint.

  5. #19
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    thanks for another great painting demo!
    a real lifesaver with practical recommendations and a straightforward working process
    "The secret to doing anything is believing that you can do it. Anything that you believe you can do strong enough, you can do. Anything. As long as you believe."
    Bob Ross
    'Updates every other decade' Book
    Death by Hue Shift!

  6. #20
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    Thank you very much sir. I just started painting this week and this small tutorial helped me understand process alot better

  7. #21
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    William you set such a great example. I am thinking about reverse adopting you officially. Thank you so much for doing this. We are very very lucky to have you posting here with us.


    Jason

  8. #22
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    Jason,

    In reference to reverse adoption, folks around the Bonneville Beach studio think I'm getting younger all the time, or at least more juvenile. I expect my hair to grow back any day.

    The kind of mini-pointers and lessons I favor would be much better on video. I simply must get hold of a video camera. I'm going to have EmilyG check around and see where I could rent one.

    Meanwhile, I intend to do a little more with the oil sketch posted here and then post more photos (and comments) of my progress.

    Bill
    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com

  9. #23
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    For this demo I’ve wanted to keep my materials simple and easily obtainable, especially for those of you living outside the USA. However, I couldn’t remain entire pure, because I enjoy working with a little Oleogel from www.naturalpigments.com. This is merely a gel medium made of linseed oil with silicate added. The silicate thickens it and a jelly medium will stay in place easier than pure linseed oil alone. The tendency for linseed oil to slide down a vertical painting surface has traditionally been checked by adding a resin to the oil. I don’t particularly like resins, so I’m a fan of Oleogel.

    I usually turn Oleogel into an even softer jelly by at least doubling the volume with more linseed oil. I keep my soft mix in a black film can.
    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com

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  11. #24
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    Yesterday I decided to work more on the torsos and take a few more snaps.

    My palette is the same as I gave at the beginning of this post except for a few more colors of convenience. Just up from the grey at the lower left, is Gamblin’s Asphaltum. It is simply Black plus Transparent Red Oxide. The mysterious dark color just below my Mary Sauer Flesh grey is a mix of Raw Umber (1 part) and Terre Verte (2 parts). Just below it is Raw Umber. Both are very useful. Above the Mary Sauer is my dark Flesh mix. This shot makes it look much lighter than it really is. Next is Gamblin Caucasian Flesh, (also appearing to be much lighter than actual fact) then Yellow Ochre, Cadmium Red Light and then a very useful mix of Terre Verte and White. The rest of the colors are not really important here.

    When I prepare my palette, I often add a little more linseed oil to each paint pile, mixing it up on a glass palette with my knife. If I’ve done it right, I don’t need to add any additional oil as I paint – or only just a little for the thinnest applications. I almost never thin my paints with solvent.
    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com

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  13. #25
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    I lightly sand the surface – just a simple dusting – with a fine tooth soft sanding pad. I’ve cut it into small pieces because I’m such a cheap guy!
    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com

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  15. #26
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    Then I rub on a very fine layer of Oleogel (or simply linseed oil). I often wipe it down with a paper towel too. The oil on the surface is negligible. I do this to bring out colors that have sunken in and to help my brush glide a little better.
    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com

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  17. #27
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    Then I made a glaze from my Raw Umber-Terre Verte mix, and a little Transparent Earth Red. I added enough oil to make the paint transparent, and brushed it on the shadow areas. I was pretty sloppy about this. It took about two minutes.

    The brush I used: Trekell #4 Long Filbert. I rested it across the top for Show-and-Tell.
    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com

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  19. #28
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    I keep a very soft white cotton paint rag on my right thigh as I sit at my easel. I wiped my brush off on the rag and then began to pounce, tap and feather the glaze. This took another five-ten minutes.
    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com

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  21. #29
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    After years of playing with colors, I have evolved a good paint mixing system. I mix up what I think I want on my wood palette, dab a very tiny bit on the painting, study it, and either darken or lighten it or modify the color until I can dab something on that works where I want it. After that, I often use that base color for other colors and keep dabbing them on with a very soft touch until I feel good. As long as a color or value stays within a related range, I don't dip my brush in my cleaning pot, just rub it out on my rag. Of course if I'm working with a black and then decide to go to a white, I rinse my brush out. Usually though, painting in oils is much tidier than most people think.

    I started with a mix of Mary Sauer and my Dark Flesh, laid some on, then made a lighter flesh with Gamblin Caucasian and my Terre Verte/White mix. I eventually put in my lightest lights with a mix of mostly white with a tiny bit of yellow ochre and/or Caucasian Flesh. Other dabs lean toward pink and grey-green (Mary Sauer plus Terre Verte/White.) Finally, I mixed a grey of simply black and white and laid it on the background in a very broken way. My #4 brush with the grey in it is shown across the top of the painting.
    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com

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  23. #30
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    Now remember kiddies, Mr. Squint and Mr. Bad Eyesight are our friends! I took off my close-up glasses and picked up a ratty old sable as a blender and began to blend here and there, lightly working the most obviously awkward transitions I could barely see. It’s a good idea not to go too far!

    I now felt I had to do some serious bread-winning painting, so I stopped playing around with this demo and set it aside to dry. I will probably work on it again in a few days just for fun and for this posting. Work from broad to fine. Always stay as loose as possible, even if your work ends up super-tight. The human eye delights in connecting the dots. True!

    An oil technique like this and working in Photoshop are very similar. If I were starting my career today, I’d recommend Photoshop for Illustration and oil painting for wall art. Mostly though, I’d recommend doing what brings you the most joy. Therein lies your art.
    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com

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