Sketchbook: A thread with artwork and words (Nov. 25th MASSIVE ART DUMPING) - Page 11
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Thread: A thread with artwork and words (Nov. 25th MASSIVE ART DUMPING)

  1. #301
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    Might have went a little too crazy with this one.

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  2. #302
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    JamesSimons is offline why? are you afraid we’ll get killed? Level 6 Gladiator: Provocator
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    Crazy is good! that said I think the pot is little too lost in the background.

    "You're already DEAD!"
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  3. #303
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    Wow I can only recognize a capsicum, is that right? But its looking very interesting and colorful overall. Its not a bad thing that its a little messy.

    By the way, could you tell me what kind of media you used for these sketches: http://attachments.conceptart.org/fo...1&d=1283838321 ? And why there are 3 black squares on the top left of the page?

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  4. #304
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    The statue painting is fantastic! Love it

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  5. #305
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    JamesSimons - Right I agree. mainly I screwed up on the pot, and I didn't know which object to focus on the most. I went with the pepper in the end though.

    robblob - Yep it's a capsicum. Those were done with charcoal pencil on Blick newsprint. Those squares are just me getting ready to draw, I want to get a good feel with the pencil on the paper before I start, sometimes it feels too rough.

    tehmeh - Thanks as always man!

    First painting I'm working on is done with a kind of custom "dead palette". Second is a tiny portrait study that I wanted to push a little further for it's size. About the size of your hand. Third is last nights portrait session at school. The registrar posed for us.

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  7. #306
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    I love how you handle your colors, especially in #301. All I can say is keep it up!

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  8. #307
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    lemming-clone- thanks, you too man.



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  9. #308
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    Every day in class we do an exercise in watercolor with a different method about doing things. The first was to paint one object and use anything to pull out the lights. The second one is an exercise my instructor has been doing for years now to show everyone how to progressively make areas darker in watercolor with layers and layers. So with one color, create an arrangement of "noodles" or rubber bands that sit on top of each other and pick a light source to model the bands based on that particular light. Otherwise just the multiple paintings I always have going on. Both on wood, the one with the green/red combo has been gessoed but the other is a thick application of acrylic gel medium that dries transparent and it lets the natural color of the wood show through. Both of them still need a little bit more work.

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  11. #309
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    Spend some time looking over you sketch book, enjoyed it. Nice line quality on the drawings, you like pushing paint too. I would suggest playing with your paint edges like you do with your line in your drawings. Something dull about your color choices in your painting backgrounds can't put my finger on what. I suggest doing color studies, just quickies to work it out or find color pics you like to break down colors. Same process you use to do figure studies, it will be a little more difficult, but can be a lot more fun. Hope this will help.
    Mike

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  12. #310
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    mburrell, thanks for the comment, but I don't think I understand exactly what you mean. I'd be great if you could show me some examples. As for color studies, I do it sometimes when I feel like that certain setup requires a little more research like in these three.

    http://attachments.conceptart.org/fo...1&d=1299645018
    http://attachments.conceptart.org/fo...1&d=1306505798
    http://attachments.conceptart.org/fo...1&d=1307422139

    I got the painting done from the last update, kind of happy with that one. A hand study from the same pose but like I was pointed out recently, most everything I do struggles with having a solid drawing underneath. Same thing with the next portrait. A fence from imagination for another quick exercise. We had to add as much texture and kinks, dents, and wear and tear but still keep it looking like a white fence. And more features studies, this time in color. They're all of me except for the top left. These took about 2 hours each. The actual piece is a 11 x 14 so they're quite small. I used a limited palette of Ultramarine blue, cadmium red, and cadmium yellow pale.

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  13. #311
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    Adam, last paintings are great. I love watercolor fence and face details.
    Great style and confidence.

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  14. #312
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    i love coming back to this thread.

    sb most art copied to page 1
    Weapons of Mass Creation 2011 ::: Add your favourites!
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  15. #313
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    Great updates Adam you are going from strength to strength I think. I was really amazed by the watercolour study of the ribbons in post #308. I've tried thinking through how I would replicate it in my mind and it seems very challenging to me. Did you do a sketch in pencil first just to work out the values and placement for the painting painting? I would love to see a video of it being painted.

    Also I love the fence painting and the facial features. Thanks for sharing.

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  16. #314
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    Great, inspiring stuff going on here.

    I was wondering: are you studying this full-time, or is it something that you decided
    to pursue for yourself?

    'hans itching to take up the brushes again'

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  17. #315
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    In post #113 and #117 you play with your line quite a bit. it defines your edge. in some drawing you have lots of shading but still play with your edges some hard some soft. the way you ride your pencil edges can be done with your paint brush too or even your shading in your drawing. You can twist your brush to an outside edge or corner in the same stroke or rotate to the thin edge of the brush to make a thinner but strong stroke.
    The example with the nude of your color study I like it the most because you harmonized all the colors with each other.

    I took your man show you a little of what I meant.
    this first one I played making your edge come and go some If the edge has interest both the figure and the ground are more interesting remember the space needs to be interesting and communicate meaning too. Using hair strokes to bleed edges.

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    In this one I pulled all your colors into each other to harmonize them. I did it a little strong to show it. It still works.

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    Your studies of the parts of the faces seem to have caught much of what I am talking about they are well done. I think you must have understood me more than you thought.
    Great SB I will keep watching.
    Yours
    Mike

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  18. #316
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    Examples

    Adam,
    In your posts #113 and #117 you have play around with your line real well in regards to broken line balancing your shading of form with just some edges defined by line giving variety and interest. Your post #310 the face parts and fencing you seem to have caught what I was talking about. Your study of the man in the blue black shirt and red background does not. Some things to consider about brush work and its use: it can define edges, textures, form or mass and focus which often denote space.

    First is a study I did of my Dad from a photo reference. It was a quick loose one that has some similarities to your work. It does have some problems but shows ways to use texture of the hair using brush strokes to transition from hair mass to face or background. I often push my paint like a drawing tool. The panel behind his head, the left edge is defined by a line that moves up from white to rose, this keeps the straight edge of the structure but also soften and breaks the edge for transition.This can be done in quick studies too. Mixed with your form building type of brusk work as a counterpoint, as in your sketches mentioned earlier. To harmonize the different colors in this painting and in all my pieces I introduce those colors into each color area as dry brush. a wash or just mixing some into the local color(which can be felt but not seen). This can be pushed quite far as an experiment if you want. It helps to tied your backgrounds to your subject(s) and solves that dullness I was feeling about your backgrounds which really are not not dull at all, just disconnected from the other colors.

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    Second is a detail of a section of a mural that pushes brush work into drawing in opposition to modeling. I noticed that some of Michelangelo's figures often had an outline when looked at closely at a distance they are felt more than seen. I was using this to separate my figure from a similar toned background and in the puppy to indicate it weight and texture. The Third pic is to show you how it fit into that full section of the mural. I hope this helps explain edges and brushwork uses. I hope it also makes more questions for you explore on your own.


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    Note: This Mural was mounted twelve foot off the ground and was 135' long so was seen from a distance. This represents only a section of the mural.

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  19. #317
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    Wow this is amazing work! I love your studies! Your great with your oil paints!

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  20. #318
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    Ugh. Love your recent stuff man (obviously). Watercolors are looking great. I just started playing with them recently and really appreciate your hand at it.

    I've been looking, just thought I'd stop in.

    Also. I hope you have had a chance to see The King Of Limbs from the basement.
    Blew my mind

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  21. #319
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    I absolutely love those last feature studies in color. I think some of those would work very well if u frame them, like the nose in the bottom middle. That'd look great on my wall ^^

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  22. #320
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    Such an intersting SB you have, the watercolors are really blowing me away... I just started playing with them, would you recommend paints in tubes or drypaint ( not sure what it is called)

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  23. #321
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    Grzessnik - Thanks man, always liked your sketchbook!

    Velocity Kendall - I appreciate it man.

    Marian - No pencil, that's one of the things I'm not allowed to do. A very light wash, maybe 10 - 15% of full pigment use. Then instead of painting the actual stripes, paint the negative spaces thereby creating ribbons as part of the positive space. (negative negative?) Then by only making smaller abstract shapes inside the larger ones you can create a sense of space and depth depending on how far and how soon you push the darks.

    Spawn2 - I'm doing both. I go to school full time to study, and on top of that I go to another school in my free time (in fact I just renewed my membership today for the next year, I haven't gone since March) I've found that actually going full time, that is, taking three studio classes at once which I did from January to April, is completely draining of your energy and soul. Before that semester from September to December I went half time and then went to the second school in all my free time and everything worked out much better. Hopefully I can do that again.

    mburrell - Ahhh, I gotcha now, I understand what you're talking about. Sometimes I don't work in colors uniformly on purpose just because I like to paint exactly what I see in front of me. I do agree that it does help unify the painting in some ways. Edges are quite important, more than most people know especially when it comes to painting a realistic representation of what you want.

    yogeshj25 - Thanks!

    Woji - Thank you, I was a tiny bit surprised by the watercolors myself to be honest. I'm working on an epic fail right now, it's a long watercolor still life that is to be rendered as realistically as possible. We'll see..... As for The Basements sessions, I was eagerly waiting for them as they were uploaded to Youtube. Yeah I'm a fanboy. But if it's going to be any band, it might as well be Radiohead.

    Teundeboer - Yeah! I kind of played around with the nose with different cropping, fun stuff. I might do that and just hang up a sketch of my nose, why not.

    Virg - I don't like to say what brand's better or worse but I have noticed certain brands differ quite a bit in quality, in hue, in texture, etc... But right now I have to go with the tubes. Who knows in the future, but I like to have high concentrations of color at my disposal. It helped me immediately overcome the problem I see a lot of other people have by diluting their color wayyy too much and their work looks weak and hazy.

    Somehow this painting escaped me last week. 3 hour portrait study, with an intention of just laying down strokes and not touching them again. (like this one http://attachments.conceptart.org/fo...1&d=1293402186) Not interested in edges in this one, many of them are obviously too sharp, but moreso color shifts, and accurate placement which in turn helps complete the drawing. Some problems in the end, drawing wise.

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  25. #322
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    Such awesome stuff in this thread, thanks for sharing!

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  26. #323
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    As an amateur critique, I'd like to say this piece is truly awesome.

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  27. #324
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    Thanks for your answer

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  28. #325
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    Hey everyone, I think I mentioned a while back that I was going to be taking a workshop with Clayton Beck and I just finished it up last Friday. I gathered ten pages of notes and condensed it down into a easier to read format. It was a 5 day course that was just focused on edges. So everything else, values, the drawing, colors, etc... were not as important as working with the edges. In this post I'm putting up everything I did during that week. We did two paintings a day (except Friday) in between discussions and demos. There was one painting I had to scrape off because it was just a complete train wreck, which was great. (You learn something from those losses.) So here's the notes I took down. They're not meant to be the end all of painting, but more so thoughts and solid ways to approach painting (oil in particular, but I don't see why this wouldn't work for almost any other medium as well)

    On Edges

     When first starting out, locate your sharpest edge on the subject. As you're painting, compare your edges to the sharpest edge.
     Keep the edges soft and do not create any sharp edges anywhere when starting out.
     When squinting at the subject, compare edges to one another.
     Start out with some lost edges and sharpen them as you paint. It's easier to sharpen an edge than to soften one.
     Edges and extremely personal.
     The shape of the light source can affect the objects edges dramatically. (Paper towel roll)

    On Brush Technique

     Too many times the majority of the paint on a brush is used as soon as the brush hits the canvas instead of being distributed evenly.
     Rolling strokes help with producing soft edges so paint strokes “roll” into one another.
     Use your entire arm for bold, huge strokes.
     Dry brush to get lost edges as well.
     Put thought behind every brushstroke.

    On Painting

     Start out in the mid tones and working your way to pure black and white.
     Set out with a goal in mind and do everything to reach that goal.
     Everything you do from how you setup your spot to the initial wash of your canvas will affect your final painting in some way.
     Start off with a block in or notes of color to build upon a solid foundation.
     Stay away from going to the extremes too fast so you always have that little extra you can use.
     Many ways to start, do them all so you know down the line how you want to start.
     Before you pick up the brush, are you seeing what you need to see?
     There are advantages and disadvantages to every technique, to every method, to any way of learning. Try to learn as many as you want and then pick up the things that most useful to you.
     If in trouble, step back and get back to the fundamentals.

    Do's and don’ts

    DO

     always try new techniques by going back to the fundamentals and straying from them with slight variations.
     many quick small studies with a goal in mind for each one. Vanderpoel's a great resource by studying each paragraph at a time.
     be self critical of your work. Don't wait until the next day when the model is gone, try to find it and fix it right away.
     step back, squint, brush, repeat.
     things you've never done before.
     master studies, all the way to stroke for stroke.
     steal good ideas.

    DONT

     make “paintings”, make studies. When making a painting, you want to focus on everything.
     have the mindset of “I'll fix it later”. If something is wrong, fix it now.
     get comfortable. Find new brushes, models, colors, canvas, setups, and compositions. Once you find yourself being in a comfort zone, you lose progression.
     complain, just do. A model shift, music changes, spots taken, doesn’t matter. You are there to get to your goal, don't make the frivolous things around you get you off track.

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  30. #326
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    Wow. I'm still just observing these, but thanks for the tips, very helpful, and please continue to post here!

    i really like the 6th one from the top of these, something beautiful about it's simplicity

    Last edited by Dope Fiend; July 29th, 2011 at 08:11 PM.
    ...the imperfections make it interesting...

    [sketchbook] [deviantart]
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  31. #327
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    Thanks everyone, and no problem Dope Fiend, glad to help in any way! I've picked up so much by just reading what other people have posted online I feel like I need to give back when I can as well.

    The first doodle shows Claytons palette and organized setup where everything is where it's supposed to be to provide maximum efficiency and speed. I've noticed people who are incredibly anal where everything must go to completely wild where brushes are dropping, paint is all over the place, and everything has paint on it. I've come to already be pretty well organized and always have everything laid out before me before I start if I can help it. When he cleans his brushes in the turp can he goes and rubs in the wet brush into a scrunched up paper towel right next to it so most of the turp can be soaked into the towel and then places the clean brush on a clean paper towel where it sits to fully dry. I noticed he never got any paint on his hands even though he was painting much less delicately than all of us.

    The second doodle just reinforces the main idea most painters share: that is to try and not keep petting your painting up close without even glancing at the subject where in fact you should be stepping back to observe and compare and laying down the stroke you want. Over brushing can easily lead to dull and "muddy" color (too many close pigments mixing creating a neutral).

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  33. #328
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    Besides the workshop I also had quite a bit of painting done elsewhere. A monochrome study of my right hand, 14 x 18 oil on panel. Second painting was done in an open session after the third workshop day. 3rd painting is a portrait of one of my instructors who teaches anatomy. I used some of the processes from last week and I definitely want to keep going forward with it. Next is a painting that would normally take 2 weeks but I only had 2 days, 6 hours total. It's a 18 x 24 and I had so much fun painting so fast. I really thought the pose wrapping around the edges of the canvas was what I wanted to capture. The watercolor again was a lot of fun but I definitely failed in some parts. I have found my bull-headed approach to watercolor has positives and negatives. I need to try to be more delicate with the paint....

    Lastly, this was my experience with my first Winton brush. I picked it up somewhere at school left behind from a student and I'm glad I didn't pay for it because this was all that was left after only 3 hours of painting.

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  35. #329
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    lov that hand study, also the creepy clown toy of sorts. great stuff happening in here. its always refreshing seeing some real paint on this site. keep it up!

    ps. also lov those blue in hue head studies in post 324! lov em!

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  36. #330
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    thanks for sharing the notes

    great paintings

    keep on rocking!

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