Art: Ryan Crouse's Inking Portfolio ...

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  1. #1
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    Talking Ryan Crouse's Inking Portfolio ...

    Hey there all, this is my 1st day at this forum!
    My name is Ryan Crouse, and here are some of my inkings:

    Ryan Crouse's Inking Portfolio ...

    Ryan Crouse's Inking Portfolio ...

    Ryan Crouse's Inking Portfolio ...

    Ryan Crouse's Inking Portfolio ...



    Last edited by starverse; October 4th, 2009 at 08:21 AM.
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  3. #2
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    I love the skulls flaming eyes!

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    Thanks, that was one of my Favorite pages I've inked!

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    Hello

    I'm new member.

    Nice to meet you ^^

    I like your ink skill that very shape it ><

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    starverse,

    What are your goals here? Is your inking something you want to develop so you can make a living at it? Or is it something that's just a fun hobby, that keeps you calm in life?

    If it's a hobby, I'll tell you right now that I love your energy, and you should keep going! But if this is a life goal to become a professional, then I have a whole lot of stuff to pass onto you.

    I just don't want to - in a critique website - give you such uselessly facile responses such as "gee, that's great", and "kick ass!". That does you no good whatsoever.

    But only if you're serious about wanting helpful critiques... then I'd like to know a few things first:

    - What are you inking with?
    - What are your specific goals? Just comics, or do you want to branch out into other things?
    - Are you planning on art college?
    - How old are you?
    - What paper are you using, exactly?
    - What other tools (pens, brushes, straight-edges, french curves, etc.) are you using, exactly?

    All these things will help others here to give you more direct and helpful critiques. The more detailed your answers are, shows us how serious you are in wanting to get proper criticism from everyone.



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    Lightbulb What I use ...

    Age - 28

    Tools of the Trade ...
    I have a set of Micron Technical Drawing Pens ranging from 005-08. For filling in larger black areas, I use a sharpie. For brushes I have the W & N Series #7 Sable Miniture #1. I also have the W&N Sceptre Gold II 101 Sable size #1 - Very good for Details. I also have a Robert Simmons White Sable #2 - 785. I use "Artworks" Super Black India Ink, "Speed Ball" Black, and when using nibs, the W & N works the best for me.

    For paper, well sometimes I get mailed the art, but that doesn't happen as often anymore. So what I do, is clean it up a bit in photo shop and then print it out on a heavier and bright paper, thus beginning the inking process. I also sometimes run to staples, and get them to enlarge it.

    Things like Art Collage, nope nothing really, just enjoy doing something that I love.
    I have ADHD so I find it very hard to find something that can keep me focused! Comic Inking/Drawing and my Electric Guitar are the two things that I have found that I can actually work on without any distractions!

    I know I am no pro, but I enjoy what I do. Comic Inking isn't how I make my living, it's my work away from work

    Here are a couple more inkings:

    Ryan Crouse's Inking Portfolio ...

    Ryan Crouse's Inking Portfolio ...

    Ryan Crouse's Inking Portfolio ...



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    Wow. I posted to you well over a year ago, and I never got back to you. I only recently changed my conceptart.org settings to be emailed when there are responses to threads I've posted in, so I finally was reminded of your work.

    I'm very sorry about not getting back to you before now.

    I must say, you have a pretty darned good instinct for how to do line weights (the 'emphasizing' of thick-to-thin lines to represent weight or strength, or something delicate). Also, the lines you do have a decent quality in and of themselves. I can actually see that you could get a professional job as an inker.

    However, there are things that would hold you back from that. When it comes to lines you put down to represent something solid and strong, you succeed well enough. But not at all do you succeeds with contrasting subjects such as hair or clothing. When you're inking a scene, your linework/brushwork must 'read' convincingly as those various things individually - or contrastingly - otherwise you'll end up with what you have now, which are characters, hair, clothing, buildings, debris, weapons, distant mountains, dark & cloudy skies, tiny flying vehicles in the distant sky & their blunt motion lines that trail them, body armor, blood, facial hair, reflections or textures on building facades... or anything else you have done above that altogether looks like everything has the same blunt texture.

    When you're inking, you're not just inking. You are drawing with ink. Your lines need to give the illusion of the very thing it's supposed to represent: hair should look like hair, metal like metal, brick & rock like brick & rock, etc. Your work now has a 'sameness' about it, as if everything has been coated with all the same material, like everything in the world you're helping to create is made out of some sort of rubber.

    But, I have a solution for you to work toward.

    First, I suspect you're inking over your own drawings. For someone who shows such promise as a comic book inker, this is not a good thing for you to keep doing at this stage. When someone inks over their own pencils (that the pencils themselves are not of Professional Standard), then whatever mistake you make with the pencils are now compounded by inking over those mistakes, which does not showcase your inks properly at all.

    You need to ink over actual professional comic book illustrators' pencils. Any working inker gets all kinds of different pencilers for him to ink. He/she must be able to adjust to whomever they're inking at the time, being able to bring to the table (literally) the kind of inking work that keeps the integrity of the pencils, all the while executing the nuanced work of a good inker who shows contrast in his work, as I have suggested above.

    From the work you've posted, it seems to me you enjoy being challenged. Since I truly believe you have the talent, and it seems as if you're on your way (if you choose to push yourself there) to being able to get professional work as an inker, my suggestion for you is to pick 2 top-notch inkers who have consistently been able to ink anyone with great quality and consistency to emulate for a while.

    For example: Klaus Janson (examples of his pen work on one level and his brush work on the other) and Steve Leialoha (example of his inks over Gene Colan, whom only few people can ink well). Both of these men have similar sensibilities with their inking skills, but they execute their work in different ways. They can both ink strong and powerful characters standing right next to beautiful and delicate objects or effects, creating a wonderful contrast that make these various contrasting characters & textures 'read' properly, making the characters come alive.

    Study what they do, how they do it. Understand they are drawing with ink, not just inking over pencil lines. After a while, you'll get the hang of what their standards are, which you can apply to your own work. It's like a cook who learns from a great chef, then goes off to make the recipes uniquely his own later on.

    I'm including some penciled pages you could try inking. Very different styles, with the strong and powerful John Romita Jr's work, Jose Luis Garcia Lopez's strikingly iconic forms, and the great Curt Swan's more real-life looking approach to superheroes. I think you might enjoy being challenged by working on something on a more mainstream already-published professional level. If you can ink variously styled people such as these with great quality and consistency, then I'd say you would be well on your way to getting professional work.

    I hope to see what you do with it.

    Good luck!

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