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  1. #14
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    From life, five and ten minutes. Not happy at all with them... I've tried to vary the approach this time (mostly because of time), but the figures seem even flatter than in my previous attempts... Any suggestions on how to improve? I'd really appreciate critiques and suggestions.

    The other two are a very quick (2-3 minutes) sketch done at the life drawing workshop and a quick anatomy study from memory.

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  3. #15
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    Forgot this one. From life, five minutes. Done on the same evening as the ones in the last post.

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  4. #16
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    Hey,
    I really like the first 8 or 9 posts. They seem a bit more...dynamic than the rest. Maybe you shouldnt concentrate on copying the model, but exaggerate it a bit. By this I dont mean just the pose, but also the rhythm of the anatomy. You do know smth about anatomy, so try and play with it a bit.
    Especially in your 19th post, I dont see much rhythm or weight there. The characteristics may not be so obvious on the model, thats true, but you'll find them if you look and think about the pose. Whats making this pose interesting, whats the model doing, how could I push the rhythm a bit, etc.
    When drawing, most humans(including me) have the tendency to straighten things up. I can see that clearly in post#19. The neck, the back, the head etc, almost one line. One direction.
    You could easily make that a bit more interesting by, maybe, pushing the torso to the left a little, get the head and neck a bit more to the right, and get the pelvis to the right as well, so that the feminine forms may be more obvious. This is just a suggestion, however.

    I really like the construction drawings in some upper posts, where you draw basic shapes and stuff. Thats a great way to learn anatomy, and to really understand whats going on with the muscles there Also, you really work around the form of what youre drawing, I like that a lot and it gives them a lot of volume.
    So, I think youre definitely on the right track (from what i can say, being a bloody student myself), and all you have to do is to take the next step

    keep going!

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  6. #17
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    KingElvis: Thanks a lot for the critiques and suggestions. Capturing the gesture dynamically and with rhythm is one of my goals -- the other one is giving solidity to my drawings --, and I really agree with everything you said. Sometimes,when sitting in front of the model, I find it hard not to copy it -- and poorly at that! --, and when that happens, the very process of drawing feels different to me; I do not feel as immersed in it as when, for example, I am trying to draw something from imagination or when I am sketching from life casually as it were, without the weight or obligation of getting things "right". I have to find a way to start looser, to observe while at the same time freeing myself from what I am observing.... so far this has been a hard balance to find.


    Here are this week's life drawings. The first two are 2 minute gestures, then one 10 and two 20's.

    I'm also including some quick (2-3 minutes) sketches of people at the life-drawing sessions done in the intervals between poses. I know they're messy and riddled with problems, but while doing some of these, I felt that "immersion" I talked about above -- the immersion I cannot quite feel when drawing from the model-- and because of that the whole process was much more pleasant; it was as if I could feel the creative effort as I jotted down my lines, and each decision, each choice -- even the unfortunate ones -- was in its own way rewarding. I'll be trying to transfer this attitude to drawing from the model next time.

    As always, suggestions and critiques are much more than welcome. Feel free to be as honest as possible -- I see no better way to learn

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  7. #18
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    Quick feet studies from imagination. Apologies for the slightly bizarre result -- I decided to try my hand at some perspective and foreshortening as I went...

    I have the feeling I am beginning to understand how to use overlaps and how to place forms in space... but I am still having great difficulty with the "technique" part of it -- that is, how to use the medium (in this case a ballpoint pen), how to improve my markings on the paper. I am not sure if I should be more careful with my lines next time, because what they seem to be lacking is a sense of fluidity, of rhythm, and there seems to be something in being "more careful" that goes against this fluidity I want to achieve.... :/ any suggestions on how to overcome this impasse?

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  8. #19
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    hey man great stuff going on here you've got a pretty good thing going on here you should keep up with it. What i would suggest is that you get to some more of the scientific parts of the anatomy to understand all the deep layers as well, so you know which muscles show when, and which ones will be flexed, et cetera.

    for that i would recommend

    Artistic Anatomy by Dr. Paul Richer and Robert Beverly Hale

    http://www.amazon.com/Artistic-Anato...5896620&sr=8-2


    and that you read up on some of Leonardo's notes and works

    The notes from the vitruvian man

    http://www.geoman.com/Vitruvius.html

    and an online version of da vinci's treatise on Painting, which includes sections on proportion and anatomy, which im currently reading through myself

    http://books.google.com/books?id=HwX...age&q=&f=false

    enjoy! and keep at it

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  10. #20
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    SweetPea: I have Leonardo's notebooks, and I should indeed give more attention to it than I have so far. Richer and Hale are great too. Hale in particular has been of great help to me (even though it doesn't show that much in my drawings yet!). Thanks for the suggestions!

    Here is a 15-min portrait study after Rubens. It's full of errors -- the eyes and the nostril (which was drawn with a horribly over-emphasized edge and completely out of perspective in relation both to the face and the nose) are only the most glaring ones, I think --, which I could not fix since it was all done directly with a ballpoint pen.

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  11. #21
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    After Pontormo

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    Last edited by bkkm; October 25th, 2009 at 10:33 AM.
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  12. #22
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    Here is a close-up of the previous drawing to show how I handled the lines and markings. I made a conscious effort to put down more rhytmical lines this time, though I'm still far from happy with it... the lines seem always too messy, too chaotic, and I don't think blaming the medium would be most constructive way to go about it. Any suggestions on how to improve those would be very, very welcome!

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  13. #23
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    I have a pretty messy line myself, but Id suggest, that, maybe try to go about drawing the way you did with those gestures in post 9...but i dont really know where you wanna go with your line. What do you wanna change?
    As far as im concerned, Id worry about the right knee (the patella should be more to the outside!).
    The left arm looks a bit strange too. I didnt notice it at first, but if you look closely, you see that the outer side of the forearm is a bit too "heavy"., (damnit, i dont know the name of that muscle..^^). but the overall drawing isnt bad and theres no "straightening up" in there, which is good!
    Stick to it man, itll pay off!
    hope i could help a bit.

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  15. #24
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    KingElvis: Thanks for the comments! And yes, you're absolutely right about the right knee. Knee is one thing (among many others!) I need to give more attention to.

    Here are some feet from imagination. Trying to understand the bigger shapes and turn them in space.

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  16. #25
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    Definitely on the right track. Agree. Push gesture when possible. Here's another excellent book for you. I push this alot in my class: The Figure by Walt Reed. This is a thorough explanation of using a mannequin type idea to construct the figure. You are already doing this by thinking of the big shapes. The book will help you to apply this concept to understand how the parts fit in a body without the distraction of muscles. This is the 1st step. Anatomy, which is 2nd, will enhance your understanding of the basic figure construction.

    Figure's 'n' Stuff SketchBook

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  18. #26
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    very nice. Curious, which reference are you using for your constructive anatomy? It looks quit Vilpuu-ish. Is that what you're using?

    I'm horrible at creating dynamic gestures, any suggestions?

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