Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Spa.
    Posts
    337
    Thanks
    495
    Thanked 397 Times in 106 Posts

    Cow Conffesions from the Old Picasso.

    Discuss this little piece of text from picasso that i´ve found. At the time he was 83 and wrote this in a letter as a confession for nobody in particular.
    I like to have a discussion around this.

    said:
    “When I was young, just as all the young people, I had the religion of art, the great art;
    but as the years passed, I have realized that art, as it was conceived until the end of 1800, is already finished, dying, condemned(...)

    We no longer felt art like a vital necessity, a spiritual necessity, as it were the case of the past centuries.
    Many among us, continue being artists and taking care of the art as it was, but by spirit of imitation, nostalgia on the tradition, by inertia, by the taste of the ostentation, the luxury, the intellectual curiosity, by fashion.
    But the great majority of us, in all means, haven´t a sincere passion for art already, They consider art just a funny thing, a leisure.

    The new generations, lovers of the mechanics and sports, more sincere, more cynical and brutal, they will be leaving the relegated art little by little to museums and libraries, like an incomprehensible and useless relic of the past.
    The moment when art are no longer food for the best ones, the artist can express their talent in all kind of attempts and new formulas, in all the whims and fantasies, in any sorts of intellectual rants.

    People no longer looks for neither consolation nor glorification in arts. And the rich ones, the idle ones, the refined ones, look for the new thing, the extraordinary thing, the original thing, the outlandish thing, the scandalous thing.

    As for me, from “cubism” and beyond, I have pleased those gentlemen and those critics with the multiple extravaganzas that I came across, and the less they understood them, the more had admired them.
    By all those games, those arabesque puzzles and riddles, I gained celebrity pretty quickly.
    Celebrity means for a painter: sales, gains, fortune, wealth. At the present as you may know, I am famous and a very wealthy man. But when I am all alone with the very me, I do not have the guts to consider me "artist" in the great and old sense of the word.

    There have been great painters in history like Leonardo, Tiziano, Rembrandt, Velazquez. I´am no more than a joker. One public who has understood his time. This is a bitter confession, painful, but have the merit of being sincere."



    I translated the thing, sorry for incoherences.
    Sketchbook is one click away:
    Never forget the Magicman


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Ian Miles For This Useful Post:


  4. #2
    Randis's Avatar
    Randis is offline ( ゚∀゚)/ ♥♥♥ おっぱい!おっぱい!
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Bucharest/Berlin
    Posts
    2,588
    Thanks
    96
    Thanked 3,057 Times in 945 Posts
    thats was a freaking huge humble pie he ate that day
    Currently working on my indie RPG , please check out
    DRAGON FIN SOUP on KICKSTARTER
    Please support my Project!
    - - - - - - - - - -
    My finished paintings and other work

  5. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lakselv, Norway
    Posts
    2,117
    Thanks
    590
    Thanked 1,014 Times in 376 Posts
    Difficult to comment upon without verification of authorship.

    ( Not saying you're a liar, dude )
    In the future, everyone will have 15 minutes of privacy.

    Portfolio
    Sketchblog
    Facebook art page

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    The Frozen North (Canada)
    Posts
    1,180
    Thanks
    382
    Thanked 416 Times in 201 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by R a n d i s View Post
    thats was a freaking huge humble pie he ate that day
    Quoted for truth.
    MY WEBSITE: PaintedSky.ca
    MY SKETCHBOOK: Ook's Book - Karyl Craves Your Approval

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Spa.
    Posts
    337
    Thanks
    495
    Thanked 397 Times in 106 Posts

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by squidmonk3j View Post
    Difficult to comment upon without verification of authorship.

    ( Not saying you're a liar, dude )
    Googleing, I´ve found this, so the authority is confirmed. But in my point of view, after a long dead of the traditional arts, day by day, all the people are most interested in traditional art than the more modern arts like conceptualism and that sorts, is good to have those tho, but the people Do really look for art as it always was.

    >>Sorolla – A Vision of Spain, is now the temporary exhibition that has received most visitors in the history of the Museum of Fine Arts in Bilbao and has contributed to the total number of visitors of 223,000 people during this Centenary year of the Museum, a record for the last decade.
    This success is preceded by the extraordinary acceptance the exhibition has had in other cities such as Valencia, Seville and Malaga where it received over 800,000 visitors. After the exhibition in Bilbao, Bancaja will take the paintings to Barcelona, Madrid and once again to Valencia.

    Painting from sorolla (awesome):
    http://www.absolutmadrid.com/wp-cont...es-sorolla.jpg

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Picasso's Confession

    "When I was young, like all the young, art, great art, was my religion; but with the years, I came to see that art, as it was understood until 1800; was henceforth finished, on its last legs, doomed, and that so called artistic activity with all its abundance is only the many formed manifestation of its agony. Men are detached from and more and more disinterested in painting, sculpture and poetry; appearances to the contrary, men today have put their hearts into everything else; the machine, scientific discoveries, wealth, the domination of natural forces and immense territories. We no longer feel art as a vital need, as a spiritual necessity, as was the case in centuries past.

    Many of us continue to be artists and to be occupied with art for reasons which have little in common with true art, but rather through a spirit of imitation, through nostalgia for tradition, through mere inertia, through love of ostentation, of prodigality, of intellectual curiosity, through fashion or through calculation. They live still through force of habit and snobbery in a recent past, but the great majority in all places no longer have any sincere passion for art, which they consider at most as a diversion, a hobby and a decoration. Little by little, new generations with a predilection for mechanics and sports, more sincere, more cynical and brutal, will leave art to the museums and libraries as an incomprehensible and useless relic of the past.

    From the moment that art is no longer the sustenance that nourishes the best, the artist may exteriorize his talent in all sorts of experiments with new formulas, in endless caprices and fancy, in all the expedients of intellectual charlatanism. In the arts, people no longer seek consolation, nor exaltation. But the refined, the rich, the indolent, distillers of quintessence seek the new, the unusual, the original, the extravagant, the shocking. And I, since cubism and beyond, I have satisfied these gentlemen and these critics with all the various whims which have entered my head, and the less they understood them, the more they admired. By amusing myself at these games, at all these tomfooleries, at all these brain-busters, riddles and arabesques, I became famous quite rapidly. And celebrity means for a painter: sales increment, money, wealth.

    Today, as you know, I am famous and very rich. But when completely alone with myself, I haven't the nerve to consider myself an artist in the great and ancient sense of the word. There have been great painters like Giotto, Titian, Rembrandt and Goya. I am only a public entertainer who has understood his time. This is a bitter confession, mine, more painful indeed than it may seem, but it has the merit of being sincere."

    PABLO PICASSO (FROM: ORIGIN 12, January 1964 Cid Corman, Editor Kyoto, Japan.; cited by Artcompasas Amsterdam: GOTOBUTTON BM_1_ http://www.euronet.nl/users/artcompas/index.html )
    Sketchbook is one click away:
    Never forget the Magicman

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    536
    Thanks
    477
    Thanked 774 Times in 261 Posts
    Picasso was a very insightful dude. I don't like his paintings, but any artist could learn from his example of being "a public entertainer who has understood his time."

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    801
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 428 Times in 168 Posts
    Mighty google says its fake...



    Thursday, 24 March 1994


    PICASSO was a fraud. He admitted so in an interview published in Italy in 1951 which was recently resurrected in this newspaper. 'Giotto, Titian, Rembrandt were great painters,' he said. 'I am only a public entertainer who has understood his times and exploited as best he could the imbecility, vanity and cupidity of his contemporaries.' He confessed he had duped the public. The truth, though, alluded to in recent letters to the Independent, is that it was not the artist that was the fake, but the interview.

    Picasso's 'confession' had been made to the Italian writer Giovanni Papini in an invented 'interview' for his journal L'Acerba; it was later included in a book published to mark his 70th birthday. It was through this compilation, Il Libro Nero, published in 1951, that the 'confession' became ammunition for a worldwide conspiracy against modern art. But a second glance at the book reveals that the Picasso 'interview' is merely one of a number of such spoofs, alongside Kafka, Freud and Stendhal.

    The Papini interview was a gift to Picasso's detractors who, for the past 40 years, have used it to discredit both his achievement and modern art as a whole. John Richardson, Picasso's current biographer, believes that the time has finally come for the 'confession' to be conclusively discredited. 'This story should be squashed once and for all. It keeps rearing its ugly head,' he says. 'It still takes in serious people. Papini was no farceur. He was a serious Futurist.'

    It was an earlier Picasso authority Pierre Daix who first exposed the true nature of the Papini 'interview' in his 1977 book La Vie de Peintre de Pablo Picasso. While the origins of the interview were an intellectual joke, their diffusion, Daix revealed, was politically motivated and was aided and abetted by Franco's police. 'This nonsensical mystification,' wrote Daix, 'was taken as gospel by various easily-gulled simpletons and so-called experts.'

    Picasso's 'confession' is now such a part of popular myth that it is frequently taken as genuine in otherwise learned journals. Last year, it appeared as such in the Spectator. Perhaps its most dangerous appearance, however, is in a key passage of Robertson Davies' 1985 novel What's Bred in the Bone: 'Picasso made a statement: . . . 'Mine is a bitter confession . . .but it has the merit of being sincere'.' As Picasso would have recognised, a fiction presented as truth within a fiction becomes twice as real.

  10. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to DeadlyFreeze For This Useful Post:


  11. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,430
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    Yeah, pretty sure that's not real.

    Edit: too slow
    Last edited by Flake; September 23rd, 2009 at 12:15 PM.

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    410
    Thanks
    525
    Thanked 477 Times in 158 Posts
    You'll say crazy things when you turn 83, too.
    SECONDS: Do you work from life of photographs?
    FRAZETTA: I work from my head.


  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Irishdrunk For This Useful Post:


  14. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Buckinghamshire, UK
    Posts
    1,764
    Thanks
    314
    Thanked 307 Times in 201 Posts
    He still took the money though...

    I do have some admiration for Picasso, who had a spark of greatness at least as a designer and a liver of life. This statement does rather confirm what I've long suspected, though, that modernist 'artists' knew in their hearts that they are not worthy of the name compared to the old masters, and that their avid admirers were ignorant poseurs. That said, lots of artists had doubts about their worth, measuring themselves against their imagined ideals. I've read that Burne Jones, for example, felt himself a fraud in his more insecure moments.

  15. #11
    Randis's Avatar
    Randis is offline ( ゚∀゚)/ ♥♥♥ おっぱい!おっぱい!
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Bucharest/Berlin
    Posts
    2,588
    Thanks
    96
    Thanked 3,057 Times in 945 Posts
    to be honest, me does not give a shit.
    Currently working on my indie RPG , please check out
    DRAGON FIN SOUP on KICKSTARTER
    Please support my Project!
    - - - - - - - - - -
    My finished paintings and other work

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Quito - Ecuador
    Posts
    3,123
    Thanks
    438
    Thanked 333 Times in 223 Posts
    Suspiciously fake! (and proved). Good read though.
    "Nihil est in intellectu quod non prius in sensu" | SB | Portfolio | FJGC (blog) | DA (Profile) | EJERCICIOS DE COLOR

  17. #13
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,201
    Thanks
    4,875
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Miles View Post
    Googleing, I´ve found this, so the authority is confirmed.
    Your google-fu is weak.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  19. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,081
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,192 Times in 1,728 Posts
    Art is a Lie that Tells the Truth ~ Picasso
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara

  20. The Following User Says Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  21. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Spa.
    Posts
    337
    Thanks
    495
    Thanked 397 Times in 106 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Your google-fu is weak.
    Sad true.
    Sketchbook is one click away:
    Never forget the Magicman

Similar Threads

  1. Question about Picasso print?
    By Minnelli in forum Art Discussions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: July 17th, 2012, 08:09 AM
  2. Seven-year-old Picasso' Kieron Williamson
    By zweiDee in forum Artist Lounge
    Replies: 66
    Last Post: December 21st, 2009, 01:40 PM
  3. Picasso-Help
    By Psmith0207 in forum Art Discussions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: November 19th, 2007, 09:28 AM
  4. Pablo Picasso oil painting
    By Machiavelli in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 10th, 2006, 04:07 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.