Sheridan, Digipen, CalArts Portfolio (in need of opinions/direction)
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Thread: Sheridan, Digipen, CalArts Portfolio (in need of opinions/direction)

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    Sheridan, Digipen, CalArts Portfolio (in need of opinions/direction)

    I'm a high school senior planning to apply to the animation programs at Sheridan, Calarts, and Digipen.
    I'm not taking any art classes currently - just attending open figure sessions and studying from books.
    I really need some critique at this point... a voice other than my own. Judging from what I've put up so far, do you think any of it could stay in the portfolio? What should I not consider including? Am I even on the right track... and what should I really focus on or change in the time I have left?
    http://possibleportfolioselection.bl...9/08/pool.html

    Last edited by Thuberbaer; September 22nd, 2009 at 03:17 PM.
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    I've had to rewrite this four times because a rootkit infection causes my computer to repeatedly crash while I'm typing... so I'm really hoping someone will read this and give me some advice, because I have no idea what to do. I'll have to keep it short this time.

    I'm no longer applying to any school for animation, as my parents won't support me if I go into animation for undergrad... or any art-related subject, for that matter. This is nothing new, but since I've recently been spending at least 6 hours each day trying to improve and put together portfolios, they've finally decided to take a firmer stance. 2d animation and film making has been my dream since I was about 4 years old, so I've never given much thought to other paths.
    I already believe that even if I had tried my best, submitted the best portfolios I could, and was accepted... I might not be able to really make the most of the programs, since my foundation would still have holes. I've heard that in order to truly thrive in an animation program, it is necessary to already be extremely proficient or advanced in all areas of drawing.

    So maybe this isn't so bad. Maybe I can find a way to use this to my advantage, and possibly end up studying animation for a masters. I now have very little time to find a major for undergrad that can help me, so I need suggestions. I have heard of people studying architecture, for example, while still studying animation and art on their own. Architecture doesn't seem so bad to me, and I suppose that would help me gain a more solid understanding of perspective among other skills.

    I really don't mean to sound like I'm whining, by the way... I just want to figure out my options now.

    Last edited by Thuberbaer; October 9th, 2009 at 02:33 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thuberbaer View Post
    So maybe this isn't so bad. Maybe I can find a way to use this to my advantage, and possibly end up studying animation for a masters. I now have very little time to find a major for undergrad that can help me, so I need suggestions. I have heard of people studying architecture, for example, while still studying animation and art on their own. Architecture doesn't seem so bad to me, and I suppose that would help me gain a more solid understanding of perspective among other skills.

    I really don't mean to sound like I'm whining, by the way... I just want to figure out my options now.
    Architecture programs tend to be incredibly demanding. You won't have time to develop skills in animation. I'd recommend some relatively cushy liberal arts major; you'll have more time on your hands, and you can take art classes with your electives.

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    I'd suggest applying for those animation programs anyway, even if it's just to give you an idea of your chances of getting in at your current level.

    To study animation you don't have to be incredibly proficient in drawing already. That's ideally what the first year of undergrad should be about. Even then only a few areas are really important in animation - gesture and draftsmanship, after that would be composition and figure/anatomy.

    Architecture I wouldn't recommend so much, you really don't need an entire degree just to study some perspective. Other degrees you might consider would be film or graphic design or art history(do those count as "art"?). If you're interested in computer graphics/animation, try computer science or math. Otherwise I would tend to agree with Meloncov, choose an easy liberal arts major that complements your interests and relish all that extra time to take art/animation electives and draw. Even better is to take a easy major at a school with a large arts or animation department.

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    If you do decide to do an unrelated major, make sure that your school allows non art majors to take studio art electives. At my old school, it was a total nightmare because of the way the art school was structured. Basically they had a ridiculous 12 credit course first year that served as a prereq for all art classes.

    So even if you are not going to be in the art school, talk to their advisors to make sure they offer electives that you want to take without some impossible prerequisites.

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    Your portfolio looks more like an illustration portfolio. You need more gesture drawings and faster life drawings. Try doing animals, too. They want to see the faster side of your drawings.

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