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Thread: Mostly oil sketches from life.

  1. #27
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    Matt-

    Nice Work! I especially like this last piece with the minimal paint. That's a great
    exercise that everyone should do! It really teaches you about less is more
    and letting the eye put things together.

    Doug
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  3. #28
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    Very nice! Lovin' the studies! I'd love to see some work that has more time invested, if your "sketches" look this good.
    Doctors heal you, Artists immortalize you.

    "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach" - bullshit.

    The usual staples for anatomy:
    George Bridgman
    Joseph Sheppard
    Andrew Loomis
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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rusko-berger View Post
    On the subject of Lines: lately I've been gravitating towards drawing figures that contain a lot this "thing"...and I don't know exactly what to call it, but you'll know what I mean. It happens a lot with arms and legs (which *usually* exhibit their inherently graceful curves), but the pose and/or angle presents you with an almost straight line. But it's not really straight. But then again it's certainly not curved. All you're left to draw are these almost imperceptible tangents, and you hafta do it without making it look clunky. This is where it becomes all about little, deft angle-lines and real sensitivity to line weight.
    Maybe you're talking about gesture? I'm not sure.
    But.... if a line is not straight then it is curved, by definition.

    Maybe we're talking semantics here but I do wanted to comment on this a little more, Matt.
    When you're objective is to describe human form as truthfully as possible, it's important to be aware of the absence of straight lines on the body. In fact one of the very hallmarks of human form is that it is always curved to a certain degree! And curved outwardly (convex) in stead of inwardly (concave). The body can be conceived as a whole, full of energy blossoming from the inside out, and therefore has a certain amplitude, a certain fullness, even on the most skinny models. A straight line is basically a human construct and useful for designing things that are not supposed to move. ( buildings, chairs, table's , ...etc.) The body is designed to move and be in constant action or motion, on the outside as well as on the inside.

    Off course as a drawing tool, I use straight lines all the time for blocking-in. Because distances are easier to judge on a straight line then on a curve. But the block-in merely serves as a compositional tool and to establish proportions. The drawing develops itself inside of it and in the end hopefully all straightness's are gone.

    My 2cents,
    Tom
    www.tomvandewouwer.com

    "There is no such thing as 'accurate drawing'. There is beautiful
    drawing, and ugly, and nothing else." JAD Ingres, Ecrits sur l'art
    (1780-1865)"
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  6. #30
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    wow, keep em coming, lots of energy in those brush strokes, seem to be capturing more than just a person those portraits, beginning to look like moods your capturing!

    keep it up, i lurking

    Alex


    Looking for work experience - let me show you what I can do
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  7. #31
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    Doug- Thanks! You do learn a lot when trying to be very conscious of each stroke you lay down. I'd love to see what you've been up to since Terry's class. Keep in touch!

    hitnrun- Thanks! The sketches are a lot of fun to do!

    Art_Addict- I really do appreciate your comment. As you stated when you draw you use straight lines as a block in. And really all of these paintings are just drawings with paint. For me there is no separation between painting and drawing. I believe that line quality and paint application is just a means to an end.

    Ghostbrush- Wow! I'm glad to hear you see more in them than just portraits.
    Last edited by mattlinz; September 24th, 2009 at 09:51 PM.
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  8. #32
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    Here's a 20 minute figure drawing on newsprint from last night.

    Thanks for looking.
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  9. #33
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    Hey Matt!

    PM with your email and I will send you some pics.
    Later,
    Doug
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  10. #34
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    Well said, Tom. And for anyone looking for inspiration and guidance, thinking about this will affect how you draw the figure. Tom's given you valuable information.
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  11. #35
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    these paintings are so amazing!! very inspirational stuff thanks for sharing these.
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  12. #36
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    Maxine Schacker- I agree, Tom does make a good point, and it is something that I need to be conscious of while I'm drawing. I'm probably not the best person to look at for guidance on the right way to draw or paint. The only thing I would add, is we all need to be aware of what were trying to say when we paint. It's not enough to only be concerned with recording what we see accurately. Some of the most accurate drawings and paintings have no life. For me growing as an artist is most important. I have a long way to go, but it's great getting feedback from such talented artist as the ones on this site.
    Last edited by mattlinz; September 28th, 2009 at 09:44 PM.
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  13. #37
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    MeTaL-Mike- I really appreciate the nice comment you made!

    Take care,

    Matt
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  14. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattlinz View Post
    Maxine Schacker- I agree, Tom does make a good point, and it is something that I need to be conscious of while I'm drawing. I'm probably not the best person to look at for guidance on the right way to draw or paint. The only thing I would add, is we all need to be aware of what were trying to say when we paint. It's not enough to only be concerned with recording what we see accurately. Some of the most accurate drawings and paintings have no life. For me growing as an artist is most important. I have a long way to go, but it's great getting feedback from such talented artist as the ones on this site.
    When discussing paintings and drawings I find it important that we all speak the same language. When you say, 'no life' this may mean very different things to different people. I think we also need to be careful not to set up a false dichotomy by saying: accuracy = no life. Both can co-exist in a drawing. Also it is not because one strives for accuracy that he/she is compromising liveliness.

    When I was studying with Ted he used to say, "with each portrait we make, we make a portrait of ourselves." And I think this is true for each painting we make, there's no escaping our own biases and preconceptions. He also used to say: " we always look at things through the prison of our own individuality"

    For me that was a liberating concept. That it was ok to try and match Nature as close as possible and in order to do so, to constantly challenge our preconceived notions of what reality looks like. And in doing so, acquiring a growing set of means to express oneself.
    Very different from the popular notion in most art schools that you need to 'free' yourself (from knowledge?) in order to tap into a mode of true 'expression'. More often then not (in a figure drawing class for example), this way of working produced results that to my eye merely expressed people's own misconceptions and limitations.

    Matt, I'm merely mentioning this to make a point, I'm not implying that this is how you work!

    On the figure drawing you posted. All in all it's a nice sketch but I wanted to refer to my previous post where I mentioned concave lines as something to avoid since it doesn't reflect the appearance of human form. The underlying curvature or gesture may be concave but the form that is packed on top of that is always 'full' and convex. Notice the undersides of her left leg, the upper tie of the same leg, the line underneath her hip bone that is sticking out on her right side, the neck,.. Being more conscious of those marks in not making them concave will add to the lively character of your figure drawings I think.

    Hope you don't mind.
    Keep up the good work,
    Tom
    Last edited by Art_Addict; September 29th, 2009 at 09:29 AM.
    www.tomvandewouwer.com

    "There is no such thing as 'accurate drawing'. There is beautiful
    drawing, and ugly, and nothing else." JAD Ingres, Ecrits sur l'art
    (1780-1865)"
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  15. #39
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    Art_Addict-

    Let me clarify what I mean by a drawing not having life. And I'm not suggesting that an accurate drawing= a lifeless drawing. I agree that we need to build a strong foundation in drawing what we see accurately, so we can learn to go beyond just an accurate drawing and really say something. What I see in many academic schools, are students filling in an external contour, termed an envelope. This envelope stiffens the drawing and is the reason many of these drawings and paintings are still, like a photograph that freezes a moment in time. They don't breathe or move. But life is always moving. I believe great drawing and painting captures what is essential to the subject opposed to rendering just the surface qualities of the form. More details does not result in greater truth or accuracy. But no I'm not suggesting that all accurate drawings and paintings are lifeless. I just think there's a slippery slope between a painting or drawing having life and no life.

    I agree with you 100% on lines blossoming outward and not inward on the figure, and that is something I will try my best to be more aware of. I know these are all things that I need to pay close attention to when I'm drawing and painting. Thanks for the reminder.

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts, and keep painting I look forward to seeing your new creations!

    Take care,

    Matt
    Last edited by mattlinz; September 30th, 2009 at 03:57 PM.
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