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  1. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by gabs View Post
    I found out today that Ringling has a 15% acceptance rate for CA...oh my!

    I've got a weighted GPA over 4 and 3.5 unweighted, 33 ACT, Hispanic Scholar...but shit, that won't help me now! Haha. Better keep working on my portfolio

    Any other nervous CA hopefuls out there?
    im really nervous


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  3. #197
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    I'm another CA hopeful . I have my future planned around attending Ringling, so I'm going to be so disappointed if I don't get accepted. I didn't know the acceptance rate was that low, now I'm even more nervous.

  4. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by gabs View Post
    I found out today that Ringling has a 15% acceptance rate for CA...oh my!

    I've got a weighted GPA over 4 and 3.5 unweighted, 33 ACT, Hispanic Scholar...but shit, that won't help me now! Haha. Better keep working on my portfolio

    Any other nervous CA hopefuls out there?
    Really? Where'd you hear that from? I took a tour at Ringling this week, and I was told it was like around 30-40% or so. But I dunno... It might have been a completely different major thinking back on it now. Haha...

    But yeah, I was planning to go into illustration, but the admissions counselor I talked to convinced me to go for CA. I'm pretty nervous, but at the same time, I've heard excellent grades and a good portfolio give you really good chances. So having that good of grades would definitely help I would think. :]

  5. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishcup View Post
    Really? Where'd you hear that from? I took a tour at Ringling this week, and I was told it was like around 30-40% or so. But I dunno... It might have been a completely different major thinking back on it now. Haha...

    But yeah, I was planning to go into illustration, but the admissions counselor I talked to convinced me to go for CA. I'm pretty nervous, but at the same time, I've heard excellent grades and a good portfolio give you really good chances. So having that good of grades would definitely help I would think. :]
    I talked to an admissions counselor on the phone yesterday, and at first i thought he said "one to seven", as in 1-7 PERCENT...but he had actually mumbled "one in seven". one in seven applicants. more accurately, 14.2 %.

    ...scary. nervous, but being nervous won't help much.

  6. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by gabs View Post
    I talked to an admissions counselor on the phone yesterday, and at first i thought he said "one to seven", as in 1-7 PERCENT...but he had actually mumbled "one in seven". one in seven applicants. more accurately, 14.2 %.
    Okay, yeah. I could definitely see that. I heard there were like 900 applicants for CA last year, so that makes more sense. Not sure about that 30%. xD

    --

    But yeah, on that note, doesn't Ringling sometimes allow you into other related majors if you're not able to get into your desired one?...if you're willing to go for another major that is.

  7. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishcup View Post
    But yeah, on that note, doesn't Ringling sometimes allow you into other related majors if you're not able to get into your desired one?...if you're willing to go for another major that is.
    Yes.
    It really isn't that difficult to get into CA, though. Seems like people make it out to be a really prestigious thing... it aint.
    Patience is a virtue, but who wants to be virtuous?

  8. #202
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    Yes.
    It really isn't that difficult to get into CA, though. Seems like people make it out to be a really prestigious thing... it aint.
    Really? Wow, cause it sure seems like it.
    How do you know it's not difficult? Is it just that 85% of the portfolios are crappy, or what, lol

  9. #203
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    Yes.
    It really isn't that difficult to get into CA, though. Seems like people make it out to be a really prestigious thing... it aint.
    Yeah, getting accepted into the program doesn't seem like it's the hard part. Staying in CA seems like the real challenge, I heard it has the highest dropout rate. Also, some people realize that they would prefer to draw rather than animate and switch to GAD or ill.

    It seems like the CA department is looking for people who can already draw pretty well and have good foundations. This is because there arn't that many drawing classes once you progress through the program. If you really want to draw and do concept art or the like, I would suggest taking a closer look at GAD or ill.

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  11. #204
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    @MartinV
    @Tim-e
    @Azheryn
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    Hey all,

    I'm a Junior in the Game Art and Design major at Ringling. I'll be one of the first people graduating with that major. Looking through the forums I feel like we've got some misconceptions running around about the GAD Major, and I'd like to take the time to address those.

    Quote Originally Posted by Azheryn View Post
    So, quick question:

    Are there any CA majors here that are in CA with the aim of getting into the video game industry?

    I'm beginning to question whether I would benefit more from CA rather than GAD. I would totally love to go into character modeling/animating/whathaveyou and I have heard of a good number of CA majors who find jobs at various game companies.

    I guess what I've noticed most is:

    1. CA seems to focus a good deal more on character development/modeling/animating than GAD does--which is more of what I'm looking for, and

    2. GAD seems to spend a good deal of time working on board games. While I can definitely see how this is relevant for the Game Design aspect of the program, I'm more interested in the modeling/animating aspect of it all.

    This being said...can any CA majors (and/or GAD majors, for that matter) give me some feedback on this? I do not want to jump into this without giving it more consideration--I have, after all, already had my supplement changed once from "Illustration" to "Game Art and Design", and I fear admissions might question my focus if I were to switch a second time. (Albeit it isn't really a shift in focus as to what I want to do after college--it's really just more of a shift in what I feel would be the best path to arrive at my destination. )

    Thanks!

    @Azheryn: The Game Art and Design program was started specifically because Ringling noticed so many of its Computer Animation graduates were working in the Games industry.

    The Game Art and Design is focusing its attentions more on environment art, level design, and generating high-quality in-game assets. At this time we're working with the Unreal Engine 3, and we'll be transitioning to using the Unreal Development Kit during the Fall of 2010.

    In our first semester of Sophomore year we spend our time learning about game mechanics, balance, and design using board games as a medium. Studying game design using board games is akin to studying animation using light tables and paper. We build our foundational understanding with traditional media before we move on to more advanced techniques and tools. Game Design is our equivalent of Concept Development, and our focus in these classes is on creating a compelling game blending mechanics, aesthetics, and story together.

    Using that as a jumping-off point, my friend Jeremy founded the Game Design Club http://www.ringling.edu/gamedesignclub and in that club we continue to strengthen our design sensibilities using traditional games as a medium.

    While you'll be modeling in Computer Animation, it is always of secondary importance to the animation. Don't expect to have enough time to model something as complex as Optimus Prime or a Star Destroyer for your work in CA.

    Part of the strength of Ringling's teaching philosophy is that it builds you up in layers, first with layers of foundational skills, then adding tools and techniques building on those foundations. The entire reason the computer animation industry is what it is today is because John Lassetter thought to bring 2D animation principles into the 3D realm back in the 80's.


    Quote Originally Posted by MartinV View Post
    Yeah, getting accepted into the program doesn't seem like it's the hard part. Staying in CA seems like the real challenge, I heard it has the highest dropout rate. Also, some people realize that they would prefer to draw rather than animate and switch to GAD or ill.

    It seems like the CA department is looking for people who can already draw pretty well and have good foundations. This is because there arn't that many drawing classes once you progress through the program. If you really want to draw and do concept art or the like, I would suggest taking a closer look at GAD or ill.
    Getting in is extremely competitive, all we see at the end of the day, however, are the people who got in. Staying in requires an extremely intense work ethic. Both GAD and CA have drawing classes, Drawing for Game Artists and Drawing for Animators respectively, as well as Contextual Figure and Drawing 101 in your freshman year. DFGA and DFA both assume you have foundational skills like an understanding of color theory, line weights, and so on and so forth.

    As of today we've only had one person switch from Computer Animation to Game Art. I've not asked her about her motivations, however. Because the two curricula so rapidly depart from each other, switching is not an easy task and generally requires starting over from near-scratch.

    The 2d work we generate in GAD generally takes the form of something that resembles concept art. I can't speak to the product of the Illustration program, but when we generate concept art, it's built with an understanding of the game design that goes into it.

    Ultimately, the best way to sum up the Game Art and Design program would be that Ringling is looking to teach you to be a Game Artist who has an understanding of Game Design.

    As for the GAD thesis, I'll have to get back to you in May 2011. That question hasn't been fully answered, nor will it be until this first class has finished the thesis project. After that, the faculty will have an understanding of what's possible given our software, and our education. The prospect right now runs the gamut from Cinematic Trailer to Unreal Mod to a stand-alone packaged demo of a game.

    Feel free to ask questions, and remember to turn your applications in before January 15th! (They do a review of all portfolios at once, turning yours in ultra-early won't affect your application. Take the time to ensure your portfolio is high quality, and concise)
    Junior, Game Art and Design
    Ringling College of Art and Design

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  13. #205
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    Thank you thank you thank you for your insight Ozzy. That clears up a lot about the GAD major.

    Quote Originally Posted by MartinV
    It seems like the CA department is looking for people who can already draw pretty well and have good foundations. This is because there arn't that many drawing classes once you progress through the program. If you really want to draw and do concept art or the like, I would suggest taking a closer look at GAD or ill.
    If you're interested in story or visual development for animation, I wouldn't discount CA as a possibility. The benefit - and Ozzy touched on this in his post - is that you're learning concept art with an understanding of the technical and aesthetic considerations that go into making an animated film. CA doesn't teach a whole lot of anatomy and life drawing - which is why a lot of us take electives like Intermediate Figure, Perspective, Anatomy, Painting, and others. Or we go to cafes, downtown, zoos (Sarasota Jungle Gardens is just down the street), or even in class to sketch.

    In the CA curriculum, we get two years of Concept Development and a year of Drawing for Animators, learning everything from the structure of story, to film principles, to character and environment design. For the CA students who are interested in story and visual development, we do pretty well. As thesinfulsaint pointed out earlier, two of us had story internships this past summer (and from what I know, we're both considering going into story once we graduate in May), and one of our grads is working in visual development at one of the big animation studios. There are a number of seniors and juniors who are more interested in the 2D medium, but still create great 3D work and find clever ways of combining the two.

    This isn't to say that Illustration isn't great for visdev and story - especially if you prefer to draw over working in 3D. A lot of students discover that animation isn't for them and switch majors. Only to say, if you want to animate and draw, CA isn't a bad choice.
    Last edited by nilaffle; November 14th, 2009 at 12:05 PM.

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  15. #206
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozzmeister00 View Post
    @Azheryn: The Game Art and Design program was started specifically because Ringling noticed so many of its Computer Animation graduates were working in the Games industry.

    The Game Art and Design is focusing its attentions more on environment art, level design, and generating high-quality in-game assets. At this time we're working with the Unreal Engine 3, and we'll be transitioning to using the Unreal Development Kit during the Fall of 2010.

    In our first semester of Sophomore year we spend our time learning about game mechanics, balance, and design using board games as a medium. Studying game design using board games is akin to studying animation using light tables and paper. We build our foundational understanding with traditional media before we move on to more advanced techniques and tools. Game Design is our equivalent of Concept Development, and our focus in these classes is on creating a compelling game blending mechanics, aesthetics, and story together.

    Using that as a jumping-off point, my friend Jeremy founded the Game Design Club http://www.ringling.edu/gamedesignclub and in that club we continue to strengthen our design sensibilities using traditional games as a medium.

    While you'll be modeling in Computer Animation, it is always of secondary importance to the animation. Don't expect to have enough time to model something as complex as Optimus Prime or a Star Destroyer for your work in CA.

    Part of the strength of Ringling's teaching philosophy is that it builds you up in layers, first with layers of foundational skills, then adding tools and techniques building on those foundations. The entire reason the computer animation industry is what it is today is because John Lassetter thought to bring 2D animation principles into the 3D realm back in the 80's.

    If you could thank someone multiple times for a post I definitely would have. xD That was immense help, thank you. Looks like I'll be sticking with GAD for sure. Thank you for clearing things up. (And thanks also to thesinfulsaint. Your feedback was a great help as well.)

  16. #207
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    Hey everyone,

    I'm Jeremy, another junior GAD. I'd like to expand upon Ozzy's points on clearing up some of the misconceptions about our major.

    The primary focus of the GAD major, along with every other major at Ringling, is art. More specifically, our efforts focus on creating characters, props, and environments, taking them from concept art to finished, in-engine 3D assets.

    However, this is not to say that capital-G Game Design has no place within the major. As mentioned above by a few people, we are introduced to the major concepts of game design -- meaningful play, balance, mechanics, and fun -- during our sophomore year, and we implement this knowledge when we make a board game or board game mod in its entirety. This is meaty, hands-on game design experience involving the drafting of complex systems with an eye towards generating fun.

    It is true that, after this giant project, game design in terms of final implementation fades somewhat into the background. But it never goes away. Ozzy stated it well above where he said that Ringling seeks to produce Game Artists who have a knowledge of Game Design. When Ringling game artists create an art asset for a game, they are informed by the knowledge that they are not merely molding a stand-alone piece that looks cool -- they know that they are creating a piece to a world in which a game takes place.

    The characters, props, and environments that we create are approached through this lens. We don't create stuff. We create worlds. And ideas from game design influence every world we create.

    We also take it upon ourselves to enhance our personal study of game design. Like Ozzy mentioned above, we've set up a Game Design Club on campus. Through this outlet, we continue our high-level game design education through game jams and other activities that mature and hone our design sensibilities. Although, recently we've been focused on helping the sophomores with their board games.

    As far as thesis goes... perhaps the actual implementation of game design will again come to the forefront. However, the important note is that this won't happen at the expense of the art.

    Hope to see many of you on campus (and at Game Design Club) next year,
    Jeremy

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  18. #208
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    You guys sound like your main focus is becoming a game "artist"...Mind if I seeeeee some art? . I'm a Freshman and want to know what to expect in the next few years.

  19. #209
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    Quote Originally Posted by Understated View Post
    You guys sound like your main focus is becoming a game "artist"...Mind if I seeeeee some art? . I'm a Freshman and want to know what to expect in the next few years.
    Freshman?! Yay! I really want to meet you guys so you should all come to Game Design Club! =D I want to see your art and ideas and notes!

    As for my art. CHECK IT, YO.

    Two sneak peaks for my WIP game mod: (as well as something completely random. there's also links to other stuff in my sig)
    - Kezrek doesn't give a ship -

    DA - CA - Blog/Portfolio

  20. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by gabs View Post
    How do you know it's not difficult? Is it just that 85% of the portfolios are crappy, or what, lol
    Not necessarily, but most portfolios aren't amazing, either.
    I'm not saying Ringling isn't a prestigious college, it is, I'm just saying getting into it isn't a prestigious thing.

    Like MartinV said, it's staying into and excelling in the program that is the hard part.
    Last edited by lowercase; December 3rd, 2009 at 08:18 AM.
    Patience is a virtue, but who wants to be virtuous?

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