Sketchbook: Kamber Parrk's Sketchbook Volume 2, Book III (at p. 21) - Page 4

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  1. #91
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    Uncle Tom's Dragon: character design based on a silly juxtaposition of words continues-- HB graphite inked with 0.45 Pigma.

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  3. #92
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    TV and a basket of towels.

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  4. #93
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    Person on couch with cat.

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    Cow study: reffed from plastic cow, guided by An Atlas Of Animal Anatomy For Artists, using (loosely) a Preston Blair stick skeleton.

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  6. #95
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  7. #96
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    After 19th Century "Punch" cartoon re Afghanistan.

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  8. #97
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    Bear redux.

    Redrew the head (mostly) of yesterday's bear to test out some "B" softness black Conte crayon on Strathmore 400.

    Experimenting with various tools that will provided greater, quicker "mass drawing" capacity than my Bic Round Stic. (I'll probably keep the BRS for "line drawing" though.)

    Plan: after I get 100 images on the crappy lined notebook stuff I'll transition over to a nice scanable sized Canson hardbound book, probably using BRS and Conte. [Probably be easier to handle more painterly subjects like "Road At Night" with such tools!]

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  9. #98
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    You've developed a GREAT HABIT of drawing everything and anything around you. This is something that many people lack including myself because of the subject matter they are drawing isn't "cool". I see a few kinks that you could work on but as an improving artist myself I've discovered that whatever problems come my way I create a solution, my own solution. So just keep drawing and drawing and drawing...you know, pretend you have an energizer battery lodged in your back.

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  10. #99
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    Hey Flanagan-- thanks fer the drop by!

    Posting daily is not too hard. Putting my work before the masses restrains me from producing total crap. But, I try to be realistic in generating "sketches" as opposed to "masterpieces." I do a fair amount of gesture-doodly crap, e.g. Posemaniacs studies on chopped up shopping bags, and I do abstract studies/experiments to test materials and ideas, but I don't post this stuff! (Some do, I don't. . .)

    Anyway.

    Foreign Legion paratroopers taking cover in a rice paddy, Vietnam, 1954. (From book photo).

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  11. #100
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    Hey Kamber, keep on drawing from life, it's good for you! Try studying some anatomy too, it can only help. I recommend Bridgman or Loomis, look up saveloomis.org to download the loomis books and get studying .

    Keep up the good work.

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  12. #101
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    Hey cdejong!

    Yup! Bridgman's pure gold. I've kinda come off a (previously) long study of anatomy, so this thread is more "environmental," for the most part.

    Of all things, I'm probably going to start folding more Vanderpoel studies into this SB-- he's really good for "planes."

    Anyway.

    Rare 2nd daily post: experiment with a figure from life using ballpoint and HB Conte crayon. Can't say this is the "end all, do all" for the SB, I might just revert to pure graphite in this Canson SB-- perhaps graphite sticks in addition to HB pencil. [But, worry not (!), the crappy lined notebook will continue for awhile longer. . .]

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  13. #102
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    Hey Kamber! I really like your drawing of the cow head; I also love your environmental drawings, but, as a piece of advice, when drawing your environments, try using vanishing points and rulers. Even if you don't want to use rulers, just quickly sketch lines to help you put your drawing in proper perspective. Also, when drawing things, try to draw what you see, not what you think you see. Like, as things move futher away, they become less discernible.

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  14. #103
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    Kaaaamber! Nice update! I really like the 'Nam sketch (war interests me...i dunno why...), but the guy sitting down is very more complete. Try and do this with all your sketches, even if it's a couple hours later. Also, since your into evironmentals right now, maybe study some plant life, animals, or some master perspective drawings to copy from. It may be an interesting turn for your art. Well, I'll catch your SB later. Until then...DRAAAW!

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  15. #104
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    darksoulzero-- welcome by!

    Generally, the stuff I draw in "2-point" would have VPs off the page. What I usually do is rough in a light, partial Horizon Line, visualize the spot off the page where the vanishing line and the HL would intersect and sort of "shoot" for it like you'd shoot/hit a golf ball. (And, I keep an eye on the subject to see if its shaping up like a TV or whatever).

    Atmospheric perspective? Probably lost due to my heavy-handedness!

    Flanagan-- 2nd repeat visitor-- I feel so special now

    The French experience in Vietnam has always fascinated me. Sitting guy just looks more complete-- everything's better with more rendering! (Uh, sometimes. . .) Environments from the Masters? That's the plan! More extended studies? That's for my "Study Book." One of the many "books" I have going. . .

    Anyway. . .

    Another escaping subject-- only got 4 or 5 minutes of blocking in-- "rendering" here was really just an excuse to lay down/experiment with more HB Conte. [Was making "value charts" earlier-- little boxes-- white through grey to black-- think the HB Conte will work for the new SB direction-- line quality will be a little rougher. But, per Jack Hamm, that's probably a good thing when handling landscape/foliage stuff.]

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  16. #105
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    Grocery store soup bar.

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  17. #106
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    A ballpoint pen can actually go a long way. If you take it slow, you can get very smooth brushlike gradients reminiscent of tattoo art.

    But you might want to start experimenting with ways to create more convincing space in these landscapes, and that means you'll want to try laying in more tones and fewer lines. Now, I know quality of materials is not the most important thing... but ballpoint ben is not an easy way to learn about tones, and that waxy notebook paper is gonna tend to reject anything else.

    I think the best thing you can do right now is get yourself a pad of toned paper. It usually comes in a pad full of all sorts of grays and browns. You've already got some dark conte crayons, so get yourself a white one. Working from a midtone allows you to consider highlights and shadows separately and encourages you to use a full range of tones. It helped me a lot, and it's actually really fun. It'll also encourage you to use less line where it's not necessary.

    Keep it up, bro

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  18. #107
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    bagshotrow-- welcome by!

    Agreed! Ballpoint is an awful "mass drawing" tool unless you're working fairly small and slow. But, you've pretty much nailed the direction I'm heading-- use Conte to lay in more tone quicker. Who knows, I might just do some stuff all with the long side of the Conte from time to time.

    I'm told the white Conte or white chalk on toned paper is more of an experts trick. [But, maybe for "Book III."]

    Below:

    Four figures.

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  19. #108
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    Another cow.

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  20. #109
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    I like how you're shading more and more, like on that re-draw of the bear's head a few posts back.
    To quickly shade large areas, I use a fat (or "jumbo") HB pencil I got recently and use the side of the lead, adding on more layers/pressure for darker places. I've been doing a lot of speed drawing the last month, so I say that helps immensely!

    Also that last cow is looking great, I'd say that's quite a tough angle!

    Keep them coming!

    Insanity is the key!
    Also, studies are a key. And passion is a key. Also, so are inspiration, motivation and dedication. Talent can be a key. Insomnia can also be a key, depression is a sad rusty little key. Damn, artists need one hell of a keyring.

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  21. #110
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    You're going to start shading, that's great! Those four people are very appealing to my eye. Although the proportion and anatomy on some of the figures can use some fixin', the perspective is really great. They actually look like they've volume, and I really dig how you drew their faces. I'm liking the cow. Once again, you nailed the perspective, and like Aila said, it is a tough angle to draw from so give yourself props for that. You're doing good and keeping up a good habit. Now go shade something PEACE.

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  22. #111
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    Hey Aila-- Welcome Back!

    Book II with more shadin' starts after this post. And, you're gonna see that cow on a regular basis-- I intend to memorize it!

    Flanagan-- Hey Again!

    The "Four Figures" sketch is the type of "information gathering" that will (eventually) turn into watercolors. Cheat Factor on the cow: the other back leg was visible underneath that blobby cow sternum structure-- left it out 'cause I didn't think it would "read right."

    Below: Preston Blair "stick and dot" skeletons applied to two figures from Peck's "Atlas"; experiment with "ball-oid" and plane head based on a Peck 3/4 head; same applied to Peck's floating skulls page; and a partial cow skeleton.

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  23. #112
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    Hey kamber, Shadow stalker gave me some good advice on line quality. You should check around about it. It'll really improve your drawings.

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  24. #113
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    Have to check that out darksoulzero!

    The Start of Book II!

    For this book: 8.5 X 11 inch Canson hardbound; Bic Roundstic; and black HB Conte. (Still sticking to 10 to 20 minute time limit for the daily: sketch 5 or 10 minutes, then render 5 or 10 minutes).

    Below: lion from An Atlas Of Animal Anatomy For Artists by Ellenberger et al.

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  25. #114
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    cool stuff, i really like the one with the bridge and cows are cool XD keep it up

    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

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  26. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamber Parrk View Post
    I'm told the white Conte or white chalk on toned paper is more of an experts trick.
    Oh, not at all. I'm pretty sure they had us working from midtones as early as drawing 1. Maybe drawing 2. The difference is, instead of giving us toned paper, they would usually have us fill in the whole paper with charcoal and then lift out highlights with an eraser, which is silliness. I've actually never had a pad of toned paper, but I have a lot of Arches and BFK which I dyed in various midtones for a printmaking project, and working from that is lovely.

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  27. #116
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    Hey bagshotrow, welcome back!

    Sticking to white Canson for this book for now. But, I have worked "reductive" in vine charcoal-- toning my own paper with charcoal powder as you describe.

    Below:

    Skeletal hip after Peck.

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  28. #117
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    You got some good studies here. Maybe I'm a bit late but I suggest that you should get your hands on some anatomy books like Bridgman's constructive anatomy and Rubins anatomy for artists for example. And try pushing some of the life drawings more until you get better and more realistic results. Good to see some blank papers btw!

    Keep it up man!

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  29. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamber Parrk View Post
    Hey Aila-- Welcome Back!
    Teehee yes, I have temporary drop-outs from CA every now and again

    Woohoo, Book II! Good to see some blank paper! Looking good so far

    Insanity is the key!
    Also, studies are a key. And passion is a key. Also, so are inspiration, motivation and dedication. Talent can be a key. Insomnia can also be a key, depression is a sad rusty little key. Damn, artists need one hell of a keyring.

    Current Sketchbook

    My little webspace

    My Old CA Sketchbook
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  30. #119
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    element 1988: thanks for the visit! Ornamental bridge is a constant theme-- have drawn it many times. Cows are just fun to draw!

    Spaggen: welcome by! More into Peck and Vanderpoel as of late. It's my intention to put longer more extended studies in my finearts thread. Though, some longer stuff will end up here-- mostly cartoons.

    Aila: no problem-- I'll just "necro" your thread and give you the attention of thousands of people across the globe to keep you drawing!

    Ahh! The much hated lined notebook. It's been reassigned as an anatomy study and gesture-doodle book-- if something interesting emerges in it from time to time I'll fold in some stuff from time to time. (There's no escape. . .)

    Below: Three dark doors.

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  31. #120
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    Study of bathroom door molding. (You really don't understand how complex some little things are until you start looking at them, start thinking about them).

    The kind of crap that goes into the lined book now-- Posemaniacs via Hogarth.

    Real "gesture drawings." This is what they look like people! Not that other stuff people call "gestures. . ." Note the fishing line like scribble.

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