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  1. #1
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    Why does eveyone hate Burne Hogarth?

    It seems like whenever his books are brought up they're dismissed. I think while there are better insrtuctors out there, he offers a uniuqe way of learning that can't hurt to take from. I don't see why this guy should be ignored.

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  3. #2
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    they don't, lots of folks here love him.

    although I'm not one of em

    personally i think hes to "slick" and prefer other sources like Bridgman,Hale,Vanderpol ect. but if he works for ya and you like how he presents the material then use it.

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  4. #3
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    "Everybody" doesn't. Some people do, and are vocal about it. I think he's a mixed bag. Dynamic Figure Drawing is probably his best book, and has good info on inventing figures. On the other hand, some of his anatomical and proportional schemata are very... non-standard, shall we say.


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  6. #4
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    i think he has good information to offer. I just get distracted by his "bubbly" musculature. He adds a very stylistic shading to his figures.. they seem almost metallic at times. Every muscle seems like a bulge. I think as long as you dont take it as the end all be all of figure drawing books.. there is some good info to take from him. Hey.. Marko Djurdjevic used his books and he turned out pretty good Its just a matter of knowing what to take and what to leave

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  8. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    "Everybody" doesn't. Some people do, and are vocal about it. I think he's a mixed bag. Dynamic Figure Drawing is probably his best book, and has good info on inventing figures. On the other hand, some of his anatomical and proportional schemata are very... non-standard, shall we say.
    I don't guess this is the same book with dynamic anatomy... I might have to check this out.

    Personally, Hogarth's style distract me. His proportions are often strange, and his lines and shapes lack... rhythm? I think... I did find his book on fabric folds rather helpful though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by biggjoee5790 View Post
    Its just a matter of knowing what to take and what to leave
    Agreed. I wouldn't be surprised if the musculature is exaggerated on his figures to help you see where they all are. They sure helped me. I think a good idea if you're going to use his stuff is to do it but balance it out with the likes of Bridgman and Loomis mixed with photo studies. That way you get a broad spectrum of how different artists interpret the figure.

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  10. #7
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    Hogarth has good concepts on the figure in perspective and making it dynamic. Using him as a way to learn artist's anatomy hasn't been good for me. Using him as a way to understand foreshortening has been more helpful.

    I learned you never really rely on one book, get your hands on as many books as possible, you'll find that libraries will often have books no longer in print or a wealth of info you may not get with current books these days. Plus, you save money instead of trial and error with purchasing books.

    Even Jack Hamm's book on figure drawing covers some things other books don't or he makes something that "clicks" with me in understanding. One good example is Hamm's book covers clavicles and shoulder lines a little bit better than I've seen in other books. most usually go to a "default" shoulder and neck line while Hamm shows several different variations.

    As you progress you'll find books better or worse for you. Also keep in mind that people tend to have a fondness for Nostalgia in a sense. If someone got into drawing and that was their first book they used, there will be some fondness for it no matter what. I still have a distinct fondness for those "Draw 50 dogs" or other animal books as such.

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  12. #8
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    Hogarth worked very well for me at one time... his stylizations helped me to understand many things better... if it sounds like I dismiss him nowadays, it's only because as I learn more I become more aware of the flaws in his approach.

    He's certainly not bad, he's just more specialized and less universal than he would like you to think. Using a variety of sources is still the best approach.

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  13. #9
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    Dynamic Anatomy has some interesting information for appreciating form and some really strong artists like that book.

    I can sum up my issues with his teaching in this one supernaturally awkward image:

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  15. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    Dynamic Anatomy has some interesting information for appreciating form and some really strong artists like that book.

    I can sum up my issues with his teaching in this one supernaturally awkward image:
    What, hidden nazi imagery?

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  17. #11
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    Maybe he was influenced by ancient egyptian art .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Djurdjevic View Post
    The reason I love and recommend Hogarth is not because of his ability to create realistic anatomy. Of course not. But what he does give you is a guideline that leaves room for your own imagination. Something that you can layer over and on top of the foundation that you're getting from studying him. Also, another thing that makes Hogarth special to me is his courage for daring poses and outrageous perspectives. I find that he gives you enough room to play with the human body as you like and wish and I think that it's detrimental to our own progression that we lose the fear of complicated stuff. That being said, realism can be easily plastered over a skillful foundational drawing. That part needs observational skills and not an anatomy book.


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  20. #13
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    Hogarth

    I remember being dazzled by Hogarth and copying his drawings. His teachings have their purpose, but it's important for anyone learning to draw the figure to use a cross reference of books and instructors.

    Recently I had a student that heavily used Hogarth's books and I could tell in class. I stood behind him and asked one word, "Hogarth?". He looked up bewildered and said,"yes". It took constant unlearning to get the student to move past what he recognized as 'right' and onto other ways of translating, and constructing the figure, so his drawings could be his and show his skill and learning.

    It takes many tools to build a house, Hogarth can be seen as one tool. A very small tool, maybe a mini wrench or one of those pointy pliers.

    -H

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