Sketchbook: One Nice Day - Page 6
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 6 of 21 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 180 of 615

Thread: One Nice Day

  1. #151
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by p0orlysketchedon View Post
    you should try drawing portion by portion. like.. divide a picture u wanna draw into squares and do the same to the paper that u are using. try to concentrate on each square individually rather than drawing the it as a whole. hoped this helped?
    Thanks! Are you refering to using the gridding method? I'm not a big fan of that and I prefer to draw by eye, because I believe that gridding won't help to develop observational skills. At least, that's just my opinion.

    I would prefer to do 100 crappy pictures using eye and feel than to do 1 perfect picture using gridding. This is just my personal opinion, though.....please don't kill me, gridding fans.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #152
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Germany, Munich
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    Thanks! Are you refering to using the gridding method? I'm not a big fan of that and I prefer to draw by eye, because I believe that gridding won't help to develop observational skills. At least, that's just my opinion.

    I would prefer to do 100 crappy pictures using eye and feel than to do 1 perfect picture using gridding. This is just my personal opinion, though.....please don't kill me, gridding fans.
    Perhaps it would fit you better to think in "subdivisions" of your picture plane instead of using an actual grid. Just subdivide the image iteratively in proportion to image features from large to small. A small number of subdivisions will probably be sufficient as a basic framework.

    Regarding your chair, you somehow skrewed up that link, when i click on it I get that drawing of your bed ;-)... well, not too funny, forget it :-)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Pauladrian For This Useful Post:


  4. #153
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    174
    Thanks
    62
    Thanked 102 Times in 92 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    xeon_ond, so ive been reading through the posts here and i just wanted to add my opinion. Firstly, i don't really agree with those who say that there this is not any improvement. i am still a total noob but i def see at least some degree of improvement from the first to last post. although it may be disproportionate to the amount of work you've done. seems like you are working very hard but not getting a maximum return from the work. i do agree with cgpauli though. seems like you are still symbolizing a lot instead of trusting the natural lines of the object. i know you've read edwards' book. try to think back to her lessons about negative space and line. try to incorporate these techniques in everything you do. i notice a good bit of obvious geometry in your work, especially in your still life drawings. this suggests to me that maybe you are thinking too much. dont worry so much about what it IS you are drawing, but only what it LOOKS like. (if that makes any sense). lines are lines, concentrate on that. also, please don't allow yourself to be discouraged, or become complacent. i hear you saying "i don't care if i don't improve..." that is not acceptable. you CAN improve, and you WILL improve. just keep working and listening to the advice of others. there are a lot of great people here and they all want to help. keep up the good work!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to PermaN00b For This Useful Post:


  6. #154
    Zazerzs's Avatar
    Zazerzs is offline ....bing me the bore worms Level 7 Gladiator: Samnite
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    866
    Thanks
    449
    Thanked 337 Times in 227 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hey Xeon_OND , well one things for sure , you are getting tons of suggestions and advice. but please take them all with a grain of salt. Some advice is more helpful than others, and some will only wind up making things more confusing. It can be very frustrating to sift thought it all.

    You can never think to much when it comes to drawing, drawing is design and design is thinking. Copying blindly what you see in front of you won't help you create and make things up from your imagination later on. So breaking things down into their geometric forms, using straight lines, knowing proportions of the figure ect are all tools that will help you not hinder you.

    Keep drawing,keep searching for answers. You are asking the right questions.

    "Talent is a word found in the mouth of the lazy to dismiss the hard work of those who have achieved."
    Anatomy Thread
    Sketchbook
    Interested in learning more about color? Read this!
    Fletcher:Color Control
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Zazerzs For This Useful Post:


  8. #155
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by cgpauli View Post
    Regarding your chair, you somehow skrewed up that link, when i click on it I get that drawing of your bed ;-)... well, not too funny, forget it :-)
    LOL, fixed.

    And thanks for your advice, Permanoob and Zazerzs!

    Well, nothing much for this week, except that I missed my 2nd portrait day due to my own carelessness and dumbness (I thought I didn't register for the event even though I did!), but this coming portrait day (7 Mar), I should be going. Maybe fate doesn't want me to go to portrait day.

    Anyway, these few days, I've been very depressed by my own in-accuracy in art. I've tried to draw what I see but the thing doesn't come out like the subject. Meaning, I can see this curve turn this way and blend that way, but my curve is off when I actually draw it out. I wish my hand can accurately draw what my eye sees; it's not so much the problem of drawing what I see.

    I also did some drawings from photos as practice.
    Click on images to see larger un-distorted size:















    As some folks suggest that I try drawing from photos to improve accuracy and see where I went wrong, I tried it.
    Below are my results. Pls gimme your absolutely HONEST & constructive crits!
    I've even put the photos next to the drawing for easy comparison.

    Click images to see accurate undistorted sizes:











    Below are faces I drew from magazines. Despite trying my very best to draw accurately on the contour etc, there IS NO LIKENESS. Any advice or crits on this?



    While it may encourage me, pls don't say "You've improve!" or "You're on your way to becoming Rembrandt!", or "You're the true descendant of Monsieur Ingres!" LOL
    For a man to succeed, he must hear nothing but jeers, taunts, scoldings, insults, beatings, harsh words and so on.

    I'm feeling a bit dizzy now, and need to rest! Had too many late nights. I wish I was a god; that way, I don't need to waste time sleeping.

    My personal quote for the day?
    "Real men don't give up art. No matter how much they suck."

    Take care!
    Xeon

    Last edited by Xeon_OND; March 1st, 2010 at 08:41 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #156
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    99
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 14 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Been looking over your sb for a while now and definitely see improvement! Your lines are starting to look very confident.

    When doing the features on faces, especially lips, try to shade in the shadow/shape as an alternative to drawing a solid line.

    Keep right on practicing can't wait to see future updates =]

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to RaynaCendre For This Useful Post:


  11. #157
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    71
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Talking

    Hey man, nice to see some improvement over your work.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #158
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    2,364
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 887 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You may not like the idea of this. But, when working "same size" from photos, you can do a little "cheat"-- take a few direct measurements off the photo and transfer them to your piece of work.

    What I'm talking about is rough and basic-- like the type of "sighting" you would do with thumb and pencil while viewing a life model. Only, in this case, press your pencil and thumb directly against the copy source.

    Essentially-- top, bottom, greatest widths, midpoint, etc.

    Otherwise, prop your copy up in the distance, and try to see it as an actual representation of an object, then do your sighting in the open air.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Kamber Parrk For This Useful Post:


  14. #159
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thumbs up

    Thanks for the replies, guys. Hope it's a good day over at your end. It sucks here at my workplace, as usual. The only time when my life doesn't suck is when I draw.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kamber Parrk View Post
    You may not like the idea of this. But, when working "same size" from photos, you can do a little "cheat"-- take a few direct measurements off the photo and transfer them to your piece of work.

    What I'm talking about is rough and basic-- like the type of "sighting" you would do with thumb and pencil while viewing a life model. Only, in this case, press your pencil and thumb directly against the copy source.

    Essentially-- top, bottom, greatest widths, midpoint, etc.

    Otherwise, prop your copy up in the distance, and try to see it as an actual representation of an object, then do your sighting in the open air.
    Thanks Kamber; some of these photos I'm drawing from are so small that I had to draw them larger. While drawing from photos is somewhat easier than drawing from life, I feel really stiff, for some reason. It's a weird uncomfortable feeling.

    The good part about photos is that they provide otherwise in-accessible subjects, such as models' faces, fancy cottages etc.

    I'm now trying to break subjects down into geometric forms and will post the work next week.

    Hopefully, consistently drawing from photos will improve my accuracy over the long run.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #160
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Everett, Washington
    Posts
    1,210
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 648 Times in 410 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Like the pic and drawing makes it easier to see what you did right or wrong lol. The hair on the first one is over exaggerated so yea lol... For the chair with the keg next to it your curve it not as fluid as the picture is it an (unnatural curve(if you will)) Anyway I could nit pick about every little detail that isn't right. keep it up >.< I've been kinda lazy with doing still life draws! Damn me! anyway Happy Trails

    The Penvirates:: Xeon_OND :: PermaN00b:: Kamber Parrk :: Cygear ::Diarum

    "Life itself is your teacher, and you are in a state of constant learning." -Bruce Lee

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Diarum For This Useful Post:


  17. #161
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Diarum View Post
    Like the pic and drawing makes it easier to see what you did right or wrong lol. The hair on the first one is over exaggerated so yea lol... For the chair with the keg next to it your curve it not as fluid as the picture is it an (unnatural curve(if you will)) Anyway I could nit pick about every little detail that isn't right. keep it up >.< I've been kinda lazy with doing still life draws! Damn me! anyway Happy Trails
    Thanks Diarum! Just what I need! In future, if you have a bad day and need to vent, come over to my SB and nit-pick on every detail in every drawing I did. Thanks!

    And Google's slogan is : Don't be evil.
    You should come up with a slogan for yourself like "Don't be lazy". That will inspire you to work harder.

    Good day!
    Xeon

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #162
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Germany, Munich
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hey Xeon, i like your new drawings, and I think you did well with those photographs (exept for some minor proportion issues, but nothing really bad).

    Quote Originally Posted by Zazerzs View Post
    You can never think to much when it comes to drawing, drawing is design and design is thinking. Copying blindly what you see in front of you won't help you create and make things up from your imagination later on. So breaking things down into their geometric forms, using straight lines, knowing proportions of the figure ect are all tools that will help you not hinder you.
    I never meant to say thinking is harmful in drawing, just like Zazerzs wrote, if you want to draw from memory some day, you have to know what you draw in any case. But I think learning to draw just what you see/"in two dimensions" is essential as a tool, because if you start drawing fancy cylinders and cubes, they should match your 2-D contours well, otherwise you will soon get lost and errors will sum up throughout your drawing. Ultimately, you should try to think/construct in three dimensions though!

    One suggestion: If you also draw from reference now, why not do some anatomy studies instead of drawings of chairs etc? I know you think that anatomy comes later, but in order to improve your accuracy it really doesn't matter what you draw, so why not draw something that will certainly come handy later? As a matter of fact, I think drawing anatomy is much more interesting! Copying some Bridgman studies or the like would also help your lines, since you will see how they are effectively used by a master.

    I would also recommend drawing from your mind sometimes, just in order to get a feel for what to remember about your studies. If it looks like crap, focus on specific details, e.g. how does a torso look or what are the basic proportions, then do some research and studies about it, and your next drawing from mind will be better. And so on. Just bringing some more variation in your drawing activities will help to keep you motivated, and it may reveal new aspects.

    Just my two cents :-)! Have Fun!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to Pauladrian For This Useful Post:


  20. #163
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by cgpauli View Post
    One suggestion: If you also draw from reference now, why not do some anatomy studies instead of drawings of chairs etc? I know you think that anatomy comes later, but in order to improve your accuracy it really doesn't matter what you draw, so why not draw something that will certainly come handy later? As a matter of fact, I think drawing anatomy is much more interesting! Copying some Bridgman studies or the like would also help your lines, since you will see how they are effectively used by a master.
    GREAT IDEA!!!! Well, I'm going to try copying some anatomy starting next week. But other than Bridgeman, are there any good books to copy anatomy from? Somehow, I always dislike Bridgeman and his style (it looks kinda stiff and hard to me, unlike those of Vilppu and Sheldon's, which are beautiful! )

    If there are none, then I guess I gotta try copy Bridgeman.
    I have downloaded a copy of his Complete Guide to drawing from life previously.

    Just bringing some more variation in your drawing activities will help to keep you motivated, and it may reveal new aspects.
    Yeah, I know.....my variety is so boring (hands and stupid still life). Now it's time for a bit of change.

    Btw, I went to buy this art eBook yesterday: http://drawingsecrets.com/products/2...rawingMastery/
    I got hooked by how great it sounds; it's US$17 and worth the look if you can spare the money, otherwise don't bother.



    Good day!
    Xeon

    Last edited by Xeon_OND; March 2nd, 2010 at 08:34 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #164
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Everett, Washington
    Posts
    1,210
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 648 Times in 410 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    GREAT IDEA!!!! Well, I'm going to try copying some anatomy starting next week. But other than Bridgeman, are there any good books to copy anatomy from? Somehow, I always dislike Bridgeman and his style (it looks kinda stiff and hard to me, unlike those of Vilppu and Sheldon's, which are beautiful! )

    If there are none, then I guess I gotta try copy Bridgeman.
    I have downloaded a copy of his Complete Guide to drawing from life previously.


    Yeah, I know.....my variety is so boring (hands and stupid still life). Now it's time for a bit of change.

    Btw, I went to buy this art eBook yesterday: http://drawingsecrets.com/products/2...rawingMastery/
    I got hooked by how great it sounds; it's US$17 and worth the look if you can spare the money, otherwise don't bother.

    Good day!
    Xeon
    Yes there is Andrew Loomis and Burne Hogarth both of them are good, Burnes is crazy exaggerated but does a good job on the muscles. check them out and see what you think.

    The Penvirates:: Xeon_OND :: PermaN00b:: Kamber Parrk :: Cygear ::Diarum

    "Life itself is your teacher, and you are in a state of constant learning." -Bruce Lee

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to Diarum For This Useful Post:


  23. #165
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    2,364
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 887 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    But other than Bridgeman, are there any good books to copy anatomy from? Xeon
    Three books by Robert Beverly Hale: Anatomy Lessons From the Great Masters; Drawing Lessons From the Great Masters; and Master Class In Figure Drawing.

    Also, Hale's translation of Richer's Artistic Anatomy.

    Anyway, thanks fer the drop by to my SB!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. The Following User Says Thank You to Kamber Parrk For This Useful Post:


  25. #166
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    174
    Thanks
    62
    Thanked 102 Times in 92 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    you know, i really wish that i had the patience to do so many still lifes like you do. they are really gonna pay off for you in the long run. also, lol'd at your "f--k curves" caption. i know exactly what you mean. it's nearly impossible to get them just right for some reason.
    i noticed a couple of flower studies mixed in with your sketches. these look pretty strong to me and make me curious to see more studies of organic objects from you, ie: plants and anatomy. anyway, keep up the good work.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. The Following User Says Thank You to PermaN00b For This Useful Post:


  27. #167
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Arizona, USA
    Posts
    1,084
    Thanks
    506
    Thanked 631 Times in 355 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I can give you a pretty decent crit on those faces if you don't mind me painting over your sketch. you probably don't...but it's always nice to ask. let me know and I'll whip them up for you.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  28. The Following User Says Thank You to JJacks For This Useful Post:


  29. #168
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by PermaN00b View Post
    you know, i really wish that i had the patience to do so many still lifes like you do. they are really gonna pay off for you in the long run. also, lol'd at your "f--k curves" caption. i know exactly what you mean. it's nearly impossible to get them just right for some reason.
    LOL, still life is because I don't have much subjects to draw from. Still life isn't so intimidating for the utter beginner, though. Btw, I wish there was a sure-fire easy technique to draw curves exactly as they are.

    Quote Originally Posted by JJacks View Post
    I can give you a pretty decent crit on those faces if you don't mind me painting over your sketch. you probably don't...but it's always nice to ask. let me know and I'll whip them up for you.
    Oh, sure do! Pls give all your crits.
    It's nice to see you drop by here, and it's a honor for me. I hope to be able to paint something like that pretty avatar you have some day. LOL

    Anyway, for some reason, when I started drawing last night, my hand was stiff as hell and my mind can't function properly. Maybe I'm too tired. I'll try again tonight.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  30. #169
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Arizona, USA
    Posts
    1,084
    Thanks
    506
    Thanked 631 Times in 355 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for the compliment. I've been in here before...I'm just pretty quiet.

    Well these are fast paintovers so they are not amazing as far as likeness go but they hopefully demonstrate the point.

    It looks like you're trying to be careful with proportions but you're having problems with angles and relationships between features. Everything in the face is related and you can learn a lot by just looking for angles and common relationships in the face beyond the whole "face is five eyes wide" rule. This is especially useful if you intend to shade.

    When you first tackle a portrait don't think of the face as individual features but as a complex object with lots of shape and dimension.

    Name:  1.jpg
Views: 761
Size:  98.9 KB

    For the first girl, her face is a little short and her features are flat and don't turn and meld with the face. In the redlines, I measured some useful angles like from the corner of the eye to the corner of the nose and from the corner of the nose to the corner of the mouth. This helps me make sure her facial features are in proportion to each other and are placed correctly. I also re-did the jaw line this way because it's a surprisingly important part of capturing someone's likeness. I think it's one of the parts of the face that varies greatly from person to person, due to age or the fatness of someone's face. Anyways, every face is slightly different observe your reference carefully. This method also carries over when drawing from life.

    Name:  3.jpg
Views: 818
Size:  75.8 KB
    Name:  4.jpg
Views: 770
Size:  84.1 KB

    Another thing I noticed is that you draw unnecessary lines. You don't need to keep all of the lines in the nose or the lips as some lines are more important than others. Notice how little linework is actually in the black sketch. Important lines here are her eyes, the nostrils and the corner of her nose, the parting of the lip and the bottom lip. Not all of the lines are the same length or thickness either. The lines in her nose for example don't have to be defined and thick to show it's shape.

    Name:  5.jpg
Views: 764
Size:  88.1 KB

    As for the second portrait, the main thing is that you didn't tackle the slant of her head. I tried to hastily do it. I still didn't catch it, but notice how level the head you drew is in comparison to the photo. Emphasize the slopes of her features first and then draw them in detail. Portraits like that are complex and require a lot of study. Just keep it up.

    I hope this helps.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  31. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to JJacks For This Useful Post:


  32. #170
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thumbs up

    Most informative advice I've ever received in a long time, JJacks! I dunno how to thank you, except....


    LOL, ok now...

    Quote Originally Posted by JJacks View Post
    It looks like you're trying to be careful with proportions but you're having problems with angles and relationships between features. Everything in the face is related and you can learn a lot by just looking for angles and common relationships in the face beyond the whole "face is five eyes wide" rule.
    Currently, when I draw portraits, I don't use angles to guage relationships between features. In fact, I never knew you could use angles as an aid in portrait as angles are hard to handle.

    Instead, what I used was something like the plumb-and-level alignment:


    For e.g: I place the pencil on the girls' edge of the nose and note the vertical line that it comes down to, then I roughly guage how much of the lips extends beyond that vertical line, then I draw the lips at that spot. Since it's not working very well, I'm gonna try your method and see how it turns out.

    Another thing I noticed is that you draw unnecessary lines. You don't need to keep all of the lines in the nose or the lips as some lines are more important than others. Notice how little linework is actually in the black sketch. Important lines here are her eyes, the nostrils and the corner of her nose, the parting of the lip and the bottom lip. Not all of the lines are the same length or thickness either. The lines in her nose for example don't have to be defined and thick to show it's shape.
    Ok, I'll bear that in mind. When I draw, all I can think of is contour drawing and using lines to draw the contours and edges of everything that is draw-able. Maybe that's one of the reasons why my stuff looks flat. I guess you're using only some lines to suggest the face and that results in a more realistic-looking face.

    The thing with faces is that the features are the hardest to draw, like the shape of the eye, the nose and the lips. In real portraiture where you're sitting like 3 - 4 feet from the subject, I wonder how those artists can even see the shape of the subject's eyes and lips, because it's so small. Maybe they use binoculars.

    As for the second portrait, the main thing is that you didn't tackle the slant of her head. I tried to hastily do it. I still didn't catch it, but notice how level the head you drew is in comparison to the photo. Emphasize the slopes of her features first and then draw them in detail. Portraits like that are complex and require a lot of study. Just keep it up.I hope this helps.
    Now that you mention it, yeah...the model's head is tilting forward a tiny-weeny bit! I'm gonna do more drawings of photos and eventually casts, then real people.

    All these info are so useful that I'm gonna print them out and save them on my site.

    Thanks!
    Xeon

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  33. #171
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Arizona, USA
    Posts
    1,084
    Thanks
    506
    Thanked 631 Times in 355 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm glad that I can help. your method of measuring on the head works as well and you can certainly use it. What helps me is to do both what I suggested and what you actually did. In life drawing, when you are doing a portrait you would have the model closer to you, so it's not so bad. Most artists hold their pencils out and measure proportions that way. If you are drawing the full body from a distance, you would focus more on the shadows on the face and where light falls rather than the details of the face. Drawing faces can be really difficult. You can do it though, just keep up the practice.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  34. #172
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've never been so excited and alive for a long long time!

    At the beginning of this week, for some reason, my hand felt cramped and stiff, and I dreaded drawing for the 1st time. After Wed, it got much better.

    Click on drawings to see large size:

    The usual stuff:





    Below are my attempts at constructional drawing. You can see the perspective compared to the photo is wrong to begin with!
    If you have any crits, pls let me know:




    And portraits from photos below. Trying to accurately draw angles are one of the toughest thing in art:



    Below drawing has no likeness! After I finished it, then I realized some angles (lips etc.) ain't correct:


    The Organisation of Illustrators Council Singapore had 2 Portrait Day events this weekend and I attended both.

    This event is a mass portrait drawing session, whereby participants (posers etc.) sit on the couch / chair, and all the artists sits in a semi-circle fashion and draw. Each portrait lasts 20 mins, and after you're done, you clip your drawing to some sort of hanger and if the poser likes it and buys it, you get SG$10 for it.

    The distance between poser and artist is approx 4 - 8+ feet away depending where you sit, though you can get closer still, but I didn't dare to try that:

    I had an eye-opener when I saw some of the works by the guys there. I think most of these drawings are expressive in nature (illustrations) and stylized. They are all very beautiful, and I hope to draw like them someday....maybe in 50 years, I hope.

    Click images to see larger size:














    My own drawings were complete garbage, but seriously, I've really tried my best to observe and draw what I see. I treated the event like an academic drawing, but LOL...mine were the worst of the lot. Here:



    I dunno how to draw the 2 kids who moved non-stop. I dunno how to draw anything that moves! Same goes for the dog.





    Profile drawing. Your 2-year old kid can do better than this:




    Below left drawing of a caucasian lady was really fun to draw, because she sat still throughout! It was a joy to draw her.
    My version of John Singer Sargent's Madame X. LOL


    The lady below moved her head throughout the pose, so I tried to combine different views together, but I failed hard:


    The next portrait day will be held next month, so in the meantime, I'll continue to study the books I've, draw from still life and photos, train myself in line confidence and ACCURACY (this is the hardest), and also gonna start copying from Bridgeman's anatomy drawings.

    As usual, if you guys have crits or feedback, let me know. I lust for negative feedback so that I can improve.

    Good day,
    Xeon

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  35. #173
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SD, CA
    Posts
    412
    Thanks
    76
    Thanked 137 Times in 124 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    hey, haven't been here in a while...

    you have made some huge improvement! keep it up

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  36. The Following User Says Thank You to WRappiii For This Useful Post:


  37. #174
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    174
    Thanks
    62
    Thanked 102 Times in 92 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    hey xeon, good to see an update. the event you attended sounds really cool. i am still too self conscious to go to anything like that, but someday i will conquer that! lol. i find it extremely hard to draw things with a time constraint. i have tried the posemaniacs 90 sec poses and always fail miserably. so kudos for having the motivation to go after it!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  38. The Following User Says Thank You to PermaN00b For This Useful Post:


  39. #175
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Everett, Washington
    Posts
    1,210
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 648 Times in 410 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I could point of a lot of errors(very minor(lol who doesn't have errors right?)) but I don't know if I feel like doing it right now...
    I think your problem with the portraits is that your drawing what you think you see instead of drawing what you really do see. Which I think is a problem a lot of us have. Lol the last ones look really weird. I don't know if that is something you meant to do or what but yea lol. When I saw the self portait we did in sept and then compared it to the one that we did not to long ago, You would think that it wasn't the same person because I had improved 100 fold.

    Yea so I have stuff to update my sketchbook but my mom wont scan them for me. So that's really crappy. It seem to me like 90% of my drawings are really shitty like my level of drawing went down. It's weird. So what i've been doing is drawing a lot of clothing in class to try and get a sense of folds and stuff. Which I think I'm getting pretty good at all the different types. Lol but I'm still scared that I'm going to get caught red handed drawing them or something. I still feel insecure about drawing in front of other people, which suck.

    Just wondering, do you think that by drawing you have encouraged others (In real life) to start drawing a lot. My nephew loves drawing now, and I think he wanted to take it serious, I had told him that if he got good enough he could do it as a job when he got older. Which if funny because all of my other nephews think that they are good (they arn't(but I'm not gonna tell them that(because there only 6-9)) But the one that does take it more serious is getting pretty good. And he like to take my drawings and draw them.

    Anyways hope to see more. Happy Trails

    The Penvirates:: Xeon_OND :: PermaN00b:: Kamber Parrk :: Cygear ::Diarum

    "Life itself is your teacher, and you are in a state of constant learning." -Bruce Lee

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  40. The Following User Says Thank You to Diarum For This Useful Post:


  41. #176
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by PermaN00b View Post
    the event you attended sounds really cool. i am still too self conscious to go to anything like that, but someday i will conquer that! lol. i find it extremely hard to draw things with a time constraint.
    LOL, if you're drawing in public and you're really concentrating on what you're drawing, you won't have any fear or self-consciousness, because you'll be more concerned with how the drawing will look etc. If you feel self-conscious during drawing in public, then it means you're not concentrating LOL

    You should try drawing in public by yourself alone. After curious stares and over-the-shoulder-looks and a couple of sneers thrown your way, your courage will be boosted by 20 times.

    If you come to Singapore one day, do let me know.

    Quote Originally Posted by Diarum View Post
    Yea so I have stuff to update my sketchbook but my mom wont scan them for me. So that's really crappy.
    Maybe you could bring your drawings to your school / nearby colleges to scan, or there are scanning/printing shops near your home? I think most libraries have scanners too.

    It seem to me like 90% of my drawings are really shitty like my level of drawing went down. It's weird. I still feel insecure about drawing in front of other people, which suck.
    Don't worry, courage comes with time. I spent 5+ months locking myself in my room to draw when I started out, and only ventured out after my drawings started to look better than 3-year olds.

    Just wondering, do you think that by drawing you have encouraged others (In real life) to start drawing a lot. My nephew loves drawing now, and I think he wanted to take it serious, I had told him that if he got good enough he could do it as a job when he got older. Which if funny because all of my other nephews think that they are good (they arn't(but aI'm not gonna tell them that(because there only 6-9)) But the one that does take it more serious is getting pretty good. And he like to take my drawings and draw them.
    Well, now you've inspired and changed someone else's life.

    So....



    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  42. #177
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    174
    Thanks
    62
    Thanked 102 Times in 92 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    If you come to Singapore one day, do let me know.
    lol, i would love to come to singapore one day. i am in the US and have never even been out of the country. (i know i am lame). so i guess ill fill "trip to singapore" in my ever growing list of things to do.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  43. The Following User Says Thank You to PermaN00b For This Useful Post:


  44. #178
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Sunshine State
    Posts
    1,598
    Thanks
    1,106
    Thanked 226 Times in 174 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Your studies are going really well! One thing I would advise, though, is to, in your next few portraits, really sit down and take the time o study the angles of those faces. Try as hard as you can to get the angles of the hairline, the jawline, the straight line that crosses horizontally between the eyes, all perfect. No room for error.

    It takes a while at first but you develop an eye for spatial relationships and you can tell right away if something is off. But you have to train yourself to do it. JJacks already gave a talk on the relationships between facial landmarks. Truth is, there is always something in a face that can tell you exactly how far feature x needs to be from feature y. If you get one measurement correct, measure something else to that, and measure other relationships to that. All the while, compare with the major proportions you should be setting down at the beginning.

    As you become better and better at that, you won't need to draw as many guidelines; you'll see them on the paper before you, and you'll be able to follow them easily.

    Good work and good luck!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  45. The Following User Says Thank You to drd For This Useful Post:


  46. #179
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,525
    Thanks
    6,808
    Thanked 348 Times in 275 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Thumbs up

    Nothing much this week....except for some life drawing session. :-)

    Below are my portraits, sucky as usual. If a portrait drawing has no likeness, it is doomed from the start to the end. I forgot to scan in the photo references and returned that book to the library!
    Only 2 photo refs remains:










    I went back to Betty Edwards book again, did the copy of Igor Stravinsky's drawing upside-down. Everything from the hand and downwards is going well, but everything above the hands goes wrong! I guess I had some problems and over-estimated the length of those curvy vertical lines of his jacket in the middle of the picture.


    The knight and rider drawing copy is way better and something I'm proud of:


    Sargent's Madam X copy below. I realized the face was wrong only after scanning the drawing and putting it side-by-side on the computer screen, so I did another one last night. I'll post that new one next week:


    xBox controller again. Above one is wrong; the lighter one at the bottom is the much more correct one!
    Through this, I've learnt to use vague shapes to indicate the positions and search for details' locations (in this case, the buttons, joysticks etc.) to guide me, otherwise it's hard to estimate how large or long the controller's body should extend back into space:


    The perspective of the shoe was originally wrong, so I redrew it below:


    And the figure drawing session! It was my 1st time drawing a nude model, so it was very uncomfortable and weird for me. I started getting used to it after 1 hour or so, but it was still kinda awkward.
    The session lasted 2.5 hours, and are a combination of 30 second, 5 minute and 10 minute poses.

    The scribbly, uncompleted stuff you see are the 30 second and 5 min ones. The more completed ones are the 10 min poses.

    It was a struggle for me.....especially the 30 second and 5 min ones. I could barely complete the 10 min ones, not to mention getting the whole thing down and making corrections. I was practically panicking the entire time. Plenty of errors. Click images to see clearer version:








    I suck, but I'm quite confident I'll be able to do slightly better next time. This time is somewhat better than the 1st figure drawing session.
    Everyone else there were able to draw seamlessly and produced true works of art, so I felt really crappy. :-S

    Nowadays, I'm focusing on drawing accurately and am gonna ignore other aspects of drawing first.

    Delacroix once said, "Cold accuracy isn't art". Cold accuracy isn't art, but cold accuracy is required of all who are beginning to learn art. When you've become good at cold accuracy, then only can you talk about expressing yourself, distorting and stylizing your art.

    After numerous setbacks recently, my lust for drawing has diminished somewhat, but I'm not giving up! I've always envied those Naturals, where the drawing just flows out from their pencil without stopping and they can draw even with their eyes closed, hanging upside down or backfacing the subject.

    I'm gonna start doing master-copies of Ingres' and Delacroix's drawings soon.

    Till next week!
    Xeon

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  47. #180
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Everett, Washington
    Posts
    1,210
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 648 Times in 410 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I know what you mean about the people that just seem like naturals. But are they really naturals, you really have to think about it do you know how much they draw lol no one can just draw out of the blue (without practice) and do an awesome job at it.
    Its funny cause Nephew A practices 100% more then B or C and you can tell that he does because is so much better. Some might say hes a natural but I've been him practice, and hes only 6 lol B and C are 9 and 7
    and for the lost of lust for drawing I know what you mean 100% but for some reason that is when I draw the most. Its weird but idk. updated my sb if you didn't see Happy Trails

    The Penvirates:: Xeon_OND :: PermaN00b:: Kamber Parrk :: Cygear ::Diarum

    "Life itself is your teacher, and you are in a state of constant learning." -Bruce Lee

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  48. The Following User Says Thank You to Diarum For This Useful Post:


Page 6 of 21 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 9

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •