Sketchbook: One Nice Day - Page 3
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Thread: One Nice Day

  1. #61
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    There was a problem when you said you only looked up for reference two times. Don't be afraid to observe. That's what gets you learning quicker.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crass View Post
    The examples in the book are 3/4 views, but the method is applicable for any angle, and for any object, not just heads. It's about rendering values instead of outlining contours. It's impossible to make symbolic drawings if you draw like that, you may still fuck it up (like me), but only because you copy the shapes incorrectly.
    That's highly interesting indeed! I'll be sure to read that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dy.laneA View Post
    My drawings looked pretty much like yours last year but I kept at it, and I hope you do to!!!
    I love you DY Iane! Thanks for your encouragement, btw. Hope you'll love your new art school!

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    hi!
    you seem to be doing very well with you studies.
    Keep it up and keep posting

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    Rock on man Keep going more more and more We're in this together!!!

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    If you keep working hard and keep studying the books of the people who know stuff ( loomis, bridgman, hogarth , vanderpoel etc etc,, ) you will improve really fast!
    But also keep drawing from reallife and imagination.. as you need to build up those skills as well! Keep at it! U'll be great !

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    Thanks Alucid, Krom and Roger! It's Monday today and hearing shit like this makes me happy and kill the Monday blues.

    And no, Alucid.....we're not in this together. You're way ahead of me (think wooden pushcart and a Ferrari)

    Take care!
    Xeon

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    Now Iím at the depth / perspective chapter of Keys to Drawing (chapter 5, I think?). I skipped the light / shadow chapter and will return to that after Iíve bought a lamp to study light logic.

    Below are the drawings I did last week.

    Hands #1:
    I now make it a point to start my day with drawing my left hand.
    The 2nd finger looks a bit thin. Next time, Iíll stand up and look at the drawing from afar to see if anything needs adjustment before I darken the lines:


    Hands #2:
    The fingers should be half the length of what you see in this drawing, due to them extending back into space (kinda foreshortened). I discovered this only after finishing the drawing! Shit this:


    Objects going back into space #1:
    This is my 1st drawing of the scene. Itís wrong. Angles, proportions etc. Took 45 mins for this and threw it away in the end:


    Objects going back into space #2:
    This is the correct version of the drawing above. The proportions of the objects in relation to each other is correct, and the angles too!
    You can see that I do some cross-hatching here, but as always, I suck at cross-hatching, but Iíll devote 6 months in future to learning that.


    Objects going back into space #3:
    After doing the above drawing, I re-arranged the objects and put them further apart, to make them go further into the distance:


    Basic forms:
    Itís been said that all things in Nature can be broken down into the 4 basic forms: Sphere, Cube, Cylinder and Cone.
    So, I tried to break my fan and hands into these shapes and did rough scribbles of these:


    Groom my room:
    A sketch of my bedroom. This is supposed to be an exercise from Keys to Drawing, where the author asks us to find a long corridor / hallway and draw it (to practice one-point perspective). I donít have easy access to long hallways etc., so I drew my room. In the end, I bite off more than I can chew, as some of the subjects in the room has 2-point perspective. Nevertheless, I pulled up my pants and use angle sighting with the pencil (tedious as fuck and only semi-accurate). Iím currently learning basics of perspective now (1, 2, 3 points etc.), and I SWEAR I WILL FUCKING RE-DO THIS DRAWING IMMEDIATELY once Iíve digested all these perspective theories:


    Special thanks to those guys (you know who u fucking are) who replied to my "Foreshortening and perspective" thread which I posted today. They greatly enlightened me.

    That's all for now. I'm gonna dive a bit into perspective for the time being.

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    Thanks a lot for your kind words! We're both still beginner- let's practice harder!




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    Your hand studies take a long time probably because you are trying to render them so thoroughly. I'd recommend you drop the rendering for now. Try to suggest form with line weight instead, like you did with the pear studies. They look quite good. When rendering with the tip of the pencil, hatching may work better than cross hatching during your baby steps. Actually, I'm not sure if cross hatching is popular at all but go for it if you like doing it. It's great that you started doing self portraits, now you can feel the true frustration of drawing. HA.

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    Looks good! How about a little more detail?

    Loomis is a good investment, even if you curse and swear at him.

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    Observations:

    -Perspective is hard. One of the books I have (Creative Perspective for Artists & Illustrators) suggests simply taking a lot of simple objects like boxes and arranging them, and drawing them. Then rearranging them and drawing them again. Do this over and over, and THEN study the theory of perspective and try to apply it. The book suggests it will be easier since you've already been drawing from observation and will have internalized some of the "rules" that way. It's worth a try.

    -I agree that you're worrying too much about rendering right now, and you're filing things in very even midtones instead of actual values. Practice value on simple objects first (like a ball) and then worry about applying it to more complicated things (like hands)

    -On drawing symbols vs what you see, have you done the exercise where you draw from photos that are upside down? That may help as it forces you to think about shapes and lines instead of objects.

    "The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the one doing it."

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    Don't beat yourself up so much, you're learning and it takes time. The blocked hand is the first hand you've done that doesn't look puffy or has a tumour on the side. You have to start looking at the abstract shapes that make up the object. Believe it or not, once you start to only see the abstract and the relationship of one abstract shape to another, you'll start to motor. Also think of the negative space; this is useful in the quest for see the abstract shape.

    There is also - Just keep drawing.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    WARNING: LONG POST BELOW

    @ BlackSpot: Thanks for the kind words! My biggest lament in art is that I wished that I had started at age 12+ and drew non-stop from that age. If I had, I would probably be near the same level as the mid-tier artists at CA now.

    @ Taneli: When I draw hands, I look at a small contour, draw it, then look up, look at the next contour, draw it. For me, average hand drawing takes 30 - 45 mins depending on pose (excluding rendering). I hope to make it faster!

    @ Viridis: Betty Edwards' book has that up-side down exercise but I hate it so much and I'm not gonna ever do that shit again. :p I always have the habit of rendering my sketches because I just can't leave the piece unfinished. It's like, I feel weird if I just leave the sketch as it is.

    ------------------------------------------------
    For starters, pls see my painting which I took 18 hours over 3 days to do. This is my best work by far! Pls give me your comments on this!



    Just kidding. Seriously, I've decided to update my blog and SB only once every Monday, instead of 2 - 3 times per week, because seriously, all these updating eats like 30% of my time away, which is bad and distracting. The 30% of my time could be spent on practicing drawing.

    Meet my latest creation: a DIY drawing board with incline / tilted.
    The black thing at the bottom providing the incline is a small hole puncher. The papers are clipped onto an acrylic board and the board won't slide off the puncher, because the jutting out of the clip also holds everything in place.
    This saved me like hundreds of $.

    Here goes:



    You can see that I've gotten rid of shading in most of these recent drawings, and replaced them with lines, which is a lot neater, faster and cleaner. I'm using every drawing I do to throw in hatching and cross-hatching to practice the technique, and I must say, I TRULY SUCK AT BOTH.

    I've discovered that a sketchy look is actually more alive than a finished look. I'm gonna take it a step further from tomorrow onwards, and let my lines fly and scream all over the fucking paper.

    Self portrait
    Yes, my self-portrait again. I stood 4-feet away when doing this. Previously, I stood 0.5 feet away. By standing further, I can see the whole likeness and face better. This one is way better than the previous few trash I drew. Simple contour drawing of the features.

    The shape of hair is weird, because that's how it is. My hair volume is ultra thin and flat by nature and it gets even flatter when I wake up in the morning, and I always had to use wax to make it look thick and voluminous when I go to work / outing.
    I've found new confidence in doing self-portraits and I'm gonna do more!


    Hands
    As usual, the bread and butter. Challenging and tough as always. Back of the hand is always easy to draw, but the front (palm area etc.) is the hardest. I've also tried holding some objects on the left hand while drawing it:
















    Perspective studies
    I've been reading some tutorials on one point perspective and two point perspective, which I can still understand up to this point:


    Below drawing is based on one of Jacques Fresco's YouTube video, done mainly for fun. Emphasis is not on humans, but on perspective and calculating where the human should go in relation to the vanishing point.


    Two drawings of my cupboard. 1st one is done free hand by eye, 2nd one done using calculation via estimated vanishing point and using ruler to draw lines. Ironically, 1st one looks more like the subject, though the vanishing points seems off.



    Below are studies of the ellipse seen in perspective:



    Stapler
    The 1st stapler is a bit off; 2nd stapler is foreshortened, with me looking downwards a little. It's hard!



    Wallet


    Clip and watch
    The ellipse on the watch is wrong. These few days, I did more studies of the ellipse and read stuff about the ellipse being seen in perspective. I will re-draw this watch again.


    Paper twirls
    Drawings of thin strips of twirly paper. I'm trying to use line to suggest form here:




    End of this week, I'm gonna setup a table in my home, and buy a chair, and a desk lamp, to draw better.

    Ugh, in case you guys are wondering, I'm drawing on my bed now (using the bed as a table while I sit on the floor).

    Once the table and lamp are setup, I'll start learning light logic, and from there, I'll be finishing Bert Dodson's Keys to Drawing soon. Then, I'll move on to other basic drawing books and still keep on drawing all the time, but all these are some way off.

    Take care!
    Xeon

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  23. #74
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    Allow me to throw in a few more sketches for the day. Next update will be next Monday! Drawing FTW!!!

    Hands
    My fastest hand so fast, I think. Completed the main sketch in 20 mins by drawing really loosing, moving the pencil fast and keeping the hand moving the entire time even when I'm not putting any line down. I'm trying to trim the time down to 15 mins and faster. The 2nd last finger looks too thin:


    Can
    The ellipse at the top of the can looks kinda crooked! I'll try again. Fuck my life:


    Hole puncher
    I got lost and carried away by the details of the puncher in the 1st drawing, and the result was that ends don't fit correctly, the proportions is off (too long).

    I got angry afterwards and very un-satisfied, so I did a 2nd drawing immediately after that, reminding myself to draw loosely and capturing the WHOLE! Fuck that. The result is in the 2nd drawing. Looks a lot better.

    1st one took 45+ mins while 2nd one took 15 mins:




    So long!
    Xeon

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    Thumbs up YO YO YO!!!!

    I suffered a huge setback today when my colleagues saw what I was drawing and told me that my art is ugly and there is no improvement, so why bother scanning in drawings and putting them on websites?

    Well, I laugh it off, but umm, deep in my heart, I was so hurt!
    I'm so ashamed of myself sometimes, but I'm not gonna give up art.

    As I told myself at the beginning of this journey, if I still see no fucking improvement after 5 years of learning and drawing, so be it.
    However, though, I've decided to keep on drawing after 5 years even if there is no considerable improvement, because drawing is fun, and that alone is enough for me to continue.

    My name is Xeon. Giving up art is something I'm unable to do, no matter how hard I try! Sorry!

    Went to my country's biggest art store (which is probably tiny compared to the US ones) and got some toys:


    Click images to see fine undistorted versions.

    Hands








    Wallet & stamp
    The ellipse on the stamp is very hard to draw and it's wrong:


    Self portrait
    This one sucks. I forgot the proportions and guidelines of portraiture (1/3 division stuff and all that) and drew this as best as I can. The face is a bit too thin. I'm sure the next one I do will be better than this:


    Rough sketches of ellipses (trying to understand drawing of ellipses and it's crazy TOUGH)


    Room scene

    I've never drawn so many objects in one scene before. One thing I realized is that you gotta do lots of sighting and measurements / comparisons all the time, otherwise mis-drawings will snowballed and the end result will look crappy. I'm gonna practice on this sort of multiple objects per scene more.
    1st drawing below is wrong, 2nd is a much better version, and the distances and look is pretty accurate! The perspective / vanishing point may be off, though.



    Brachiosaurus Brancaii
    That Brachiosaurus in the Humboldt Museum of Berlin (also called Museum fŁr Naturkunde) is the most magnificient skeleton display in the world! Here's a photo:


    I've a tiny toy of this dinosaur (though not the same pose as the museum one). Here's some drawings I did of it. The 1st one is the most detailed one; the rest are greatly simplified as my focus is on drawing foreshortened views:






    Paper twirls
    They make good warm-up exercises:




    Hatching
    I tried to do some hatching practice on some simple objects but it's so wrong! Especially the sphere. My strokes and lines are in wrong direction, especially for the sphere. I'm gonna check it out and find out more:


    Hole puncher
    The hole puncher never ceases to amaze me:


    Leaves!
    I picked up some leaves on my way to work last week and drew them. In the morning, they're soft and all, but as the day goes on, the leaves wither and become erect and real hard, crispy. I'm trying to use line quality to suggest form here:










    Glue bottles and cans
    Trying to practice drawing ellipses:




    Manikin / mannequin
    My latest toy. I know people use manikins for poses and reference, but since a manikin is handy to carry around, doing life drawings of it in different poses / views doesn't hurt:



    I'm gonna focus more on light / shadows and perspective stuff now, and also life-draw daily.
    Feel free to critique away. Otherwise, I will never improve even if I draw for 10 years. Someone pls sponsor me to go to an art school and buy me a place there.

    Will post more next week!
    Xeon

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  26. #76
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    damn, you are really on a roll! I love those leaves. If you kept drawing leaves like that, it could be sellable. But, mostly keep drawing from life and don't let up!

    The hands are getting better but they're still a bit flat. Exaggerate (in your mind) the light to dark . Wrap the light and the shadow around each object till you gain the illusion of form.

    KEEP GOING!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    I suffered a huge setback today when my colleagues saw what I was drawing and told me that my art is ugly and there is no improvement, so why bother scanning in drawings and putting them on websites?

    Well, I laugh it off, but umm, deep in my heart, I was so hurt!
    I'm so ashamed of myself sometimes, but I'm not gonna give up art.

    As I told myself at the beginning of this journey, if I still see no fucking improvement after 5 years of learning and drawing, so be it.
    However, though, I've decided to keep on drawing after 5 years even if there is no considerable improvement, because drawing is fun, and that alone is enough for me to continue.


    What? That prick! The next time you see him you should kill him


    Seriously, don't give up! Don't listen to him, you have definitely improved! It's looking much better than your post on the first page!



    One small tip, perhaps beside drawing complicated dinosaur toy, it'd be better to practice the simple shapes first.

    I have that mannequin and the hand mannequin too! XD Too bad my local art store doesn't sell the geometrical shapes... I substitute them using normal things, lol.


    I say keep on drawing the mannequin! It'd definitely help a lot on foreshortening and imagining human's body in 3D form

    Keep on posting~

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    If I listened to everything they said in highschool, I'd probably have killed them all and wound up on trial. They know nothing about art, so they don't matter. Even if they were art experts, they're still uncaring, so they still don't matter. Learn to tune out all the BS in your life like changing the channel on a radio.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TASmith View Post
    The hands are getting better but they're still a bit flat. Exaggerate (in your mind) the light to dark . Wrap the light and the shadow around each object till you gain the illusion of form.
    I'll try that! Thanks for your advice!

    Quote Originally Posted by Helaine View Post
    What? That prick! The next time you see him you should kill him
    My hands are for drawing, not for killing.

    Seriously, don't give up! Don't listen to him, you have definitely improved! It's looking much better than your post on the first page!
    Thanks for your encouragement! Seriously, though, your SB is progressing at an amazing rate. Definitely one of the fastest-improving SBs at CA.

    I have that mannequin and the hand mannequin too! XD Too bad my local art store doesn't sell the geometrical shapes... I substitute them using normal things, lol.
    LOL, actually, those geometrical shapes are made of styrofoam and not hard white plastic as you might think. They also sell styrofoam torsos and head casts to draw.
    I regret buying that stupid hand manikin cos' it costs 3.2 times more than the 8" manikin. Bought it on impulse, I guess. I don't even need it since I've my left hand.

    I say keep on drawing the mannequin! It'd definitely help a lot on foreshortening and imagining human's body in 3D form
    You and I seems to have the same idea on this! The problem with manikins is that they're not fully posable. Say, you wanna do wild crazy poses, well, no way. I'm probably getting those S.Buck manikins after this.

    Quote Originally Posted by TASmith View Post
    If I listened to everything they said in highschool, I'd probably have killed them all and wound up on trial. They know nothing about art, so they don't matter. Even if they were art experts, they're still uncaring, so they still don't matter. Learn to tune out all the BS in your life like changing the channel on a radio.
    Thanks for your advice! It's still good to control your temper, or else you'll probably be drawing using chalk in some jail walls for the rest of your life.

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    Dude, don't listen to your imbecile co-workers, anyone can see that you've improved. Keep working!



    My sketchbook is bigger than yours.
    (not really)

    Cool people you might want to check out:

    Dy.laneA
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    Everybody has started small. So keep working ^^

    Try different ways to draw, like already mentioned, try not to use outlines or do some drawings with just one line (dont lift the pen until you are done.
    WIth experimenting come some nice ideas...sometimes ;P

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    Talking

    Hope everyone is fine and well!

    Art schools have always been expensive as fuck.

    I don't have money for that, so I'm going to the next closest thing, which is a local school offering a Diploma in Communication Design (graphic design, more or less). It's not a fine arts course, but it's better than nothing. They do offer a module in sketch art, though.

    Click on images below to see undistorted versions.

    I went to buy 2 new books last week. The picture below says it all:


    I've also made 2 small (4" x 4") desk clocks as birthday gifts to 2 of my colleagues. SHAMELESS PLUG: I'm selling these clocks for US$20 each, excluding shipping. You won't find these elsewhere! Hand-made!


    Meanwhile, below are my drawings for last week.

    Hands
    Not a day goes by without these:
    (below pic is half-completed as my boss came in as I was drawing)













    Chiaroscuro
    Tried this for fun after reading Mark Willenbrink's book.
    My first and last attempt at chiaroscuro drawing. Did you laugh after seeing it? I hope you do! LOL


    Fan
    Sketched this using continuous line drawing with the "I don't care how this turns out" mindset to loosen my hand as a warm-up and it's really fun!


    Hole puncher
    Another exercise in loosening up. I need to do such exercises often otherwise I'll fall back into the trap of drawing super stiffly:


    Hatching
    After having problems hatching simple objects properly, I gave up.
    I have somewhat more success at cross hatching:


    Manikin
    More drawings of my manikin in various poses:








    Warm-ups
    Looked down my apartment and drew what I saw using a very loose hand. Some of the sketches are from my bedroom and my own hand:






    Structural sketch
    When I draw things from life, my method has always been contour drawing. I think there's this thing called "structural drawing", where you break down a subject into the simple geometrical shapes and construct them, but I'm very new to that. Mark Willenbrink's book did show an example of this, so I used my water bottle as an exercise:


    Beds
    A drawing of me and my brother's bed, mostly by eye + some sighting:


    Mirror

    The note on the mirror reads "LazyMike.com". It's a free adult video site.


    Self portraits
    In the 1st portrait, I use some smudging to blend the pencil to create shadows on the left side of the face but it's shit.
    The 2nd portrait resembles me quite a bit, but the lips are inaccurate, though. I need to learn how to draw realistic versions of the facial features. All my portraits's facial features so far has been mostly line / contour drawing:



    Old man reading news
    Looked down from my 7-storey apartment and saw this old groccer reading sitting on a chair and reading newspapers. He uses a toppled old shelf as his table.
    I was kinda scared the guy would walk up and leave during my drawing, and he sure did!
    Thus, I briefly sketched in the more important points in his body, like the arms, how the legs look etc/. The arms are too long, though.


    These few nights, I'm reading "Successful Drawing" by Andrew Loomis, regarding perspective. I'm learning perspective now, btw. According to Loomis, this topic should precede all other areas in art, since perspective is related to light logic as well.

    Anyway, school starts in December 09 (2 months from now), but I'll place more priority on my drawings over the school, because my main interest is more into illustration and not graphic design, but I'll make sure I learn something there.

    See you!
    Xeon

    Last edited by Xeon_OND; November 2nd, 2009 at 03:14 AM.
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  38. #83
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    Let me divulge one secret of drawing from life. You know how objects have shadows and they have highlights? Those lightest areas that reflect so much light they seem white?

    Those highlights aren't nearly as strong as the white of a blank page, which you start with. You want to depower the blank white? Get rid of it.

    On your next portrait, before you begin drawing, shade the whole page an even gray tone with your pencil. Then draw over it like any other page, and at the end, go back into it with an erasor.

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  40. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by TASmith View Post
    On your next portrait, before you begin drawing, shade the whole page an even gray tone with your pencil. Then draw over it like any other page, and at the end, go back into it with an erasor.
    Thanks TASmith! LOL, I remember Betty Edwards has this same method in her book, just that she says to use graphite stick to shade the entire paper. It's just distracting, though, because during the sketching, you need to erase, and when that happens, you need to use the graphite stick to shade the area back before you draw.

    Now.......

    ---------------------- Some Updates ---------------------

    I'm now concentrating on learning perspective. The principles behind perspective is pretty understandable, but when applying it to life drawing, it becomes another issue.

    I've paid my registration fees for my new school and class starts on 1 Dec 09. Sigh! Lots of tried nights and work are awaiting me.

    I got a new table and chair in my room. Previously, I drew on my bed:


    Now, as for my drawings done last week, as usual:











    Plastic container and motorbike


    Building
    A sketch of a building below my apartment:


    Cross Hatching
    My latest attempt at practicing cross hatching. It's better than the 1st time I tried it:


    Manikin







    Miscellaneous objects




    Perspective studies
    Some exercises from Phil Metzger's book:





    Phone
    A 7+ min brief sketch of my office phone:


    Paper twirls


    Scissors + eraser


    Tape dispenser


    Chair and table
    A drawing of my new chair and table. These 2 are treasures to me, because they are good subjects to train my seeing of negative spaces! 3 months ago, I almost wanted to give up art cos' negative spaces are so abstract to me, but now they're a total life saver. When things get overwhelming, try drawing the negative spaces! They make life way easier. Nowadays, I also use negative spaces to check and make my drawings more accurate:







    Now that I look at my SB, I did have some improvement compared to 3 months ago, though not by much. And my SB seems to contain the same old boring shitload of hands and office stationery / still life in the house.

    HOWEVAH.......all that will soon fucking change, I think! Starting December, I'm gonna try to puck up my courage and balls, and draw in public. I really hope to be able to draw people from life soon, but it's tough, because they move all the time. Gesture drawing? Ugh no.

    Take care and see you all next week!
    Xeon

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    "It's just distracting, though, because during the sketching, you need to erase, and when that happens, you need to use the graphite stick to shade the area back before you draw"

    No, you just need to get out of the mindset that an erasor is just to "erase" as in destroy/obliterate all it touches. You were born into the digital age where every tool is either "on or off", but pencils and erasors are analog tools. You don't just erase with that thing, you draw with it. If you use it correctly, you shouldn't always have to draw back over. Try that exercise, and see what happens. Try this exercise too: Try drawing different kinds of lines based on the following adjectives, no shapes, no forms, just abstract lines:

    2 Controlled vs. uncontrolled
    4 Correct vs. incorrect
    6 Exciting vs. boring
    8 Beautiful vs. ugly
    10 Soft vs. hard
    12 Smooth vs. rough
    14 Curvy vs. jagged
    16 Dry vs. Watery
    18 Painterly vs. technical
    20 Wide vs. thin
    22 Dark vs. light
    24 Angry vs. calm
    26 Sad vs. happy
    28 Aggressive vs. submissive
    30 Thoughtful vs. thoughtless
    32 Tired vs. surprised
    34 Friendly vs. Frightening
    36 Hungry vs. Stuffed
    38 Suspicious vs. Trusting
    40 Confusing vs. Simple
    42 Curious vs. Apathetic
    44 Loving vs Hating
    46 Responsible vs Irresponsible
    48 Freezing vs. Melting
    50 Lively vs. Dead

    Note: this exercise works better in a class setting when you see every student doing something different for each adjective. Then, you see there's not just 50 different kinds of line, but an infinite amount.

    Also, on these scanned images, I think you're leveling too much of the gray midtones out. These jpegs feel/are more like overexposed photos of your work than the original drawings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TASmith View Post
    "It's just distracting, though, because during the sketching, you need to erase, and when that happens, you need to use the graphite stick to shade the area back before you draw"

    No, you just need to get out of the mindset that an erasor is just to "erase" as in destroy/obliterate all it touches. You were born into the digital age where every tool is either "on or off", but pencils and erasors are analog tools. You don't just erase with that thing, you draw with it. If you use it correctly, you shouldn't always have to draw back over.
    Umm yeah, I do understand that an eraser can be used to pick up highlights etc.

    Try drawing different kinds of lines based on the following adjectives, no shapes, no forms, just abstract lines:

    2 Controlled vs. uncontrolled
    4 Correct vs. incorrect
    6 Exciting vs. boring
    8 Beautiful vs. ugly
    10 Soft vs. hard
    12 Smooth vs. rough
    14 Curvy vs. jagged
    16 Dry vs. Watery
    18 Painterly vs. technical
    20 Wide vs. thin
    22 Dark vs. light
    24 Angry vs. calm
    26 Sad vs. happy
    28 Aggressive vs. submissive
    30 Thoughtful vs. thoughtless
    32 Tired vs. surprised
    34 Friendly vs. Frightening
    36 Hungry vs. Stuffed
    38 Suspicious vs. Trusting
    40 Confusing vs. Simple
    42 Curious vs. Apathetic
    44 Loving vs Hating
    46 Responsible vs Irresponsible
    48 Freezing vs. Melting
    50 Lively vs. Dead
    Interesting exercise! I don't have a classroom setting, but maybe I could start a thread in CA here and get people to post their lines since I would be interested to see it myself. That's the best way to emulate a classroom setting.
    Very good idea!

    Also, on these scanned images, I think you're leveling too much of the gray midtones out. These jpegs feel/are more like overexposed photos of your work than the original drawings.
    You're right. You're SOOOO fucking right. After I scanned my images, I use Photoshop to increase the Brightness and Contrast (by 40% and 30+% respectively).
    Maybe that's what causing the "overexposed effect".

    I'm doing this cos' I want my drawings' background to be white. I mean, the paper I'm drawing on is white, but when I scan it, the paper's color comes out like greyish! Maybe it's my scanner. I hope to get a new scanner soon.

    Thanks! Now to try out the line exercise.
    Xeon

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    it's normal for the image to look gray, and it's normal to level it, but easy does it! The second you start to see the paper's losing it's detail, bring it back a tad.

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    Great job on the Perspective sketches. I can definitely tell your hands are improving too.

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    Thanks TAS and Seb!

    1) Now, TAS, I tried that "Controlled vs. uncontrolled, Correct vs. incorrect" exercise you suggested yesterday but I got stuck after a while. It's like my brain doesn't know how to draw out the lines. Maybe this is why I can't understand gesture drawing cos' I don't feel it.
    Anyway, I'll post mine next Monday here.

    2) Just curious, but for you guys here, is your scanner able to scan paper and the output color is white? I'm getting a new scanner that can scan white paper as white paper, not white paper as gray paper.

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    Your hand studies are coming along very good!

    I noticed you said that one of the better ones was one of the faster ones. Kimon Nicolaides talks about this phenomenon in The Natural Way To Draw in the section about gesture drawing.

    Sometimes when you're moving fast and just responding to the subject you catch the "gesture" of the subject. This makes a difference in overall quality!

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