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Thread: Middle aged madness: First signs

  1. #27
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    5.10.09 Sketch

    This is a William Russell Flint study. I wanted to practice using comparative measuring whilst working upright on the easel with charcoal. I should find time to do more studies like this as I feel its a good way to learn and get more familiar working on an easel and using charcoal.
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  3. #28
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    Life Drawing class Week 4 (7.10.09)

    Last week we were told to bring in six items to use that couldn't be used like pencils or brushes. I couldn't think of much as you can hold almost anything and use it like a pencil or brush. So I took kitchen roll paper, tin foil, sponge, newspaper, plastic and a sweet chestnut still in its prickly case. The whole lesson was spent drawing with what we brought in, or using other students items, with black ink. It was all about mark making and how using different tools can free up your mind and give you a fresh approach to the way you work. It was great fun and I ended up standing in a pool of ink wearing it.
    A point to note was, I began to fill the A1 sheet of paper. All my previous drawings have been much smaller. Towards the end of the lesson I even felt like I was painting, rather than drawing, which was great as it is my long term goal to paint classically in oils.

    1. Usual quick warm sketches in charcoal
    2. Top row: plastic, kitchen roll
    bottom row: sponge, tin foil
    3. The teacher felt I was too comfortable so gave me an artificial flower (daisy) and told me to hold it at the very end of the stem and use my left hand. As you can see I had no control at all. It looks like something you might find hanging in the Modern Tate under 'Modern Abstract Madness - inner feelings of artist', I could probably sell it for a fortune!
    4 & 5. Still left hand with flower and starting to tame my tool. I like 4 but lost it again on 5.
    6. Tin foil
    7. Sprig of rosemary. Very interesting to draw with plus it smells lovely.
    8. Sprig of rosemary for line work and sponge for blocking in tone.
    Last edited by Marian Rowling; October 12th, 2009 at 08:28 AM. Reason: Correct spelling mistakes
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  4. #29
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    Nice stuff!

    I think that varying the studies, like you do, will help in continued progress.

    Keep at it!
    "Less questions. More doing.
    Learn by doing. Learn how to learn without asking a million questions. Learn to trust advice. Learn to go with your gut, to go on your own volition. Go. Do."
    - Kev Ferrara


    sketchbook

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  5. #30
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    Hey man!
    Thanks for stopping by my book. Your work is improving! You are doing all the right things. That cube still life is a great thing to do when you start. Makes you really pay attention to form and angles and its most basic point. Some of those ink drawings turned out great also. Sketching is a great time to experiment. I need to get more into the inks again. Remember to keep loose and work into the specifics-and always compare the head to the torso to the legs. If those three parts of the body work together then you will have a solid well proportioned drawing. Its hard to do sometimes but what I do is focus on the head and then go in a figure 8 pattern down to the feet and back up with my eyes blurred. Then I quickly do the same over my drawing. I usually repeat the process until I notice something. You have to want to find it though, or else your brain will get lazy and not find anything. You are doing well, and you are doing the right things. Keep drawing!
    -Also-very jealous of the airshow experience. I have only been to like two. They were the most inspiring and influential days of my childhood! WW1 planes hold a special section of my heart. Glad you can admire them as well!
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  6. #31
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    Sirkenneth: I really appreciate your feedback and insight into your methods of breaking down the figure. You have a clear and interesting way of explaining things that makes sense to me. I'm really struggling with getting my basic body proportions and angles right at the moment, so your help and support has come just at the right time. Thankyou so much for coming back and taking the time to comment.


    Life Drawing class Week 5 (14.10.09)

    1. Quick warm up sketches
    2. Long pose about 30mins - Really struggled with the legs.
    3. Long pose about 45mins - I tried to slow down with this and focus on looking at the model and working out how to measure and get down the basic proportions and angles.
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  7. #32
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    nice star so far! You're doing a lot of studies, which is good, as it's the fastest way to improve.

    I might suggest doing some more value studies to balance out your contour line studies. They help build two different skills.
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  8. #33
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    Sublimus: Thanks so much for your feedback. In my eagerness to learn I don't always realise what I'm not studying enough of so I really appreciate your help.


    6.10.09 - 15.10.09 Sketches

    1. Work in progress (W.I.P.) Ron Tiner study
    2. Bridgman study and pose from www.characterdesigns.com
    3. Walt Reed study
    4. Raphael study
    5. Tonal study
    6. Michelangelo study
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  9. #34
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    Hey Marian thanks for stopping by my little old sketchbook from looking at yours i see i have some catching up to do to get to your pencil level, i love your bridgeman studies something i will be diving into soon! I also got the structure of man from Riven Phoenix thought i had learnt loads and then seemed to forget it all! but i am sure it will all help in the end. Also i think i may have to find a life drawing class near me looks like fun and attempting to draw with "kitchen roll paper, tin foil, sponge, newspaper, plastic and a sweet chestnut still in its prickly case" now thats just plain insane!! Keep at it i say your doing great!

    tis indeed a small world whereabouts in Bucks does your sister live?


    The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all art and science.
    (Albert Einstein)
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  10. #35
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    really nice work keep posting.

    MY SKETCHBOOK
    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=171543
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  11. #36
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    latigid: Thanks for your kind words. I had to laugh as I did exactly the same as you with regard to Riven Phoenix. There's so much I want to learn that I have tended to jump from one to the other. I would highly recommend taking a life class if you can as you learn so much.

    extremeilustrator: Thankyou for your kind words of encouragement. Its great to have feedback from fellow artists.


    Life Drawing class Week 6 (21.10.09)

    I really enjoyed myself this week. We had a lovely young women modelling who I found really interesting to draw. Although it might not be obvious from my drawings I was also pleased that I planned and filled the A1 paper with my poses. By slowing down and spending more time studying the model I was able to get a more accurate drawing of the proportions and angles. I was especially pleased with my attempt at the laying down pose as the foreshortening was really challenging. The sitting pose looks wrong to me I think the head is too big.

    1. Quick warm up sketches
    2. Long pose 30mins
    3. Long pose 45mins
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  12. #37
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    It's great that your starting to slow down and really observe your models, someone told me that you should spend about 70% of your time observing, and 30% drawing. Really forces you to focus on shapes and contours and such. Life drawing will help your drawing so much so keep up the good work. With your seated pose, I think her legs are too short and thin as oppose to the head being too big.

    Peace
    Dan
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  13. #38
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    It's great you're starting to take the time to really focus on your model. Someone once told me that about 70% of your time should be spent observing when life drawing. Forces you to really focus on shapes and contours and such. Life drawing will help your skills develop no end so keep up the good work. With your seated pose, I think her legs are too short and thin as oppose to her head being too big.

    Peace
    Dan
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  14. #39
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    Thanks for sharing your sketchbook! I'm 35 years old and just started learning how to draw. Your sketchbook is inspiring

    I like the studies you've done. I've been working through the Jack Hamm "Drawing the Head and Figure" book so it's good to see someone else doing studies from Hamm as well.

    I'll keep an eye on your sketchbook to see what you're up to. Keep it up!
    My Sketchbook

    "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." -- Confucius
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