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Thread: Pencil - shading technique (help)

  1. #14
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    so 9H would be the darkest?
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  3. #15
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    and i know im being annoying, but can you make any recommendations as to what different pencils a begginer should get?
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  4. #16
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    leads

    9H would be hard as a nail.
    very little graphite on the paper.
    so hard probably tear the paper.

    the B's would be the softest.

    2B and upwards to 6B

    the H's are hard.

    3H or 2H is good for drafting
    up to a HB

    HB good for general work.
    good allround pencil.

    2B for sketching.

    something like a 4B good for tones
    life drawing maybe.
    Darrell Bowman
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  5. #17
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    Wow, very helpful.
    Thanks alot man =D
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  6. #18
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    oh lol, and i got another question..
    why are woodless pencils more expensive than wood..ful pencils or whatever lol
    whats the difference? (besides the lack of wood =P)
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  7. #19
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    leads

    Not sure why personally.

    some have plastic coatings.

    maybe your talking about drafting pencils.

    if you have a wacom and computer.
    alot of drawing can be practice on the computer.
    without purchasing these items.

    maybe there imported dont know.

    there is also in usa a number 2 pencil.
    i think that a HB around the office pencil.

    if your scanning images in.
    i think alot of guys not sure use 2h then
    shade in with H and darken with HB
    to make your blacks.

    everyone different
    some use chisel pencils.
    some sharpen with nifes.
    loads of variables.

    if i got a job and got 10 minutes to do a layout
    i pick up a soft pencil.
    if i got time i go harder depends on how much
    detail i want.
    some times draw eyes in hard pencil
    use a soft one for the hair.
    Darrell Bowman
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  8. #20
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    woodless pencils, especially the softer ones, such as an 8B, are fantastic for laying out things very quickly. my guess on why they're more expensive would be... graphite is more expensive than wood? maybe? and, they're for a specialized thing, you know, supply/demand and all that. anyway, yeah, an 8B is great for quick thumbnails or storyboards. you can quickly sketch them, then use the side for laying out tones. I really never use H's. the hardest I'll usually go is a 2B. the H's really do tear up your paper and I've never needed to go that light for anything.
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  9. #21
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    One thing's for sure...try out all different kinds of pencils until you find something you're comfortable with. Personally, I've found subtle differences in pencils from brand to brand that affect my drawing, even if it is in subtle ways. Every company produces their pencils differently. One company's 4B could be quite a bit softer than another's. I've settled on Staedtler Mars Lumograph pencils and have found those to fit my liking. I buy them by the box load, especially HB's!! But everyone's hand is different. Your touch could be heavier or lighter so you need to find the pencil that fits your own touch.

    Well, hope this helps someone! LOL! Man...I read the previous paragraph and I think, "My life revolves around pencils."
    "I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve."
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  10. #22
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    lol, nothing wrong with that smeagol =P
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  11. #23
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    Quick Question...when someone cross hatches...should that only be used to create darker tonal areas or should it be used on the whole image? Did that make sense?
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  12. #24
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    generally crosshatching will build up a darker tone...not terribly useful for light areas.

    for my shading, l lay down some graphite then use an assortment of materials to blend it. each material gives a different texture, i use felt, tissues, toilet paper, cloth, chamois etc.

    Smeagol71- thats a good drawing. i think though for beginners its easier to smudge at first to get used to creating tone, then when proficient with that, one can move on to trying to shade without smudging. but i think smudging comes in very useful at times.

    i think on one of my next drawings i'll try to shade with out smudging to see how it comes out
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  13. #25
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    oh crap, zippzopp, why didnt someone tell me that earlier!
    Ive been doing it wrong my entire life lol
    I hate crosshatching, I give up on it =P
    And also, I dont like the way the shading looks when ive smudged it around..is there any technique to smudging?
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  14. #26
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    I think this is one of my favorite threads yet! Probably because I have such respect for the pencil!

    Anyway...

    MindCandy: Cross hatching is kind of a subjective thing. I've seen people use it heavily in a drawing and things look fantastic. I've seen people use smudging more and it looks great. I guess it all has to do with what you're trying to accomplish and what you're trying to communicate, but I can tell you what I do (for what it's worth). I use cross hatching all over my drawings but tend to only use lighter strokes in lighter areas of my subject. I tend to try and "imply" form in lighter areas and that usually doesn't utilize crosshatching for me. One important thing I try to do is crosshatch with the form that I'm shading, and I don't make hatch marks perpendicular to each other. I will hatch and create a darker tone by rotating strokes anywhere from 1 to 45 degrees, left or right. Does this make sense? I think I might need to post a pic to explain myself. Let me see what I can come up with and then maybe it will be clear. Anyway, my goal is to create a more organic and loose technique and define form with the strokes. A master of this and a master of the pencil is Paul Calle, whom I think you know of!

    ZippZopp: Thanks! I appreciate the compliment. You're right about smudging. It does have it's place and if I did "put it down" that wasn't my intention. I use it from time to time and think it definitely creates a distinctive look.

    Amphex: Hello! We'll hook up on OpenCanvas one of these nights! ) But to reply to your question, there is one technique I use with smudging that has seemed to work well. It requires one of those Pentel clic erasers, or something similar. It works good for hair or fur. First, lay down your general tones, darks and lights, until you're satisfied with the range. Then, with a knife cut the tip of the eraser flat so that it has a sharp edge. You then can use this to cut away at your smudging to create medium and light toned hairs, depending on the pressure you use. You could end up going through quite a few erasers because you have to keep the edge sharp, but the result is usually worth it. You may need to go back and refine things but I've found it works pretty good.

    If I get a chance I'll post some examples or pics to make it more clear. For all those interested though, I posted a pencil self-portrait I did sometime ago. I'm not really that satisfied with the drawing, but I bring it up because you're able to see a lot of individual strokes in the piece. Like I said...for what it's worth...

    Pencil - shading technique (help)
    "I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve."
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