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Thread: Left-Handed Bandit - OrochiG's (Bich) Sketchbook

  1. #300
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    Keep those whiplashing action packed drawings coming, cause you are on a winning streak.
    I cannot imagine my morning tea without watching your beautiful creations. My life without
    your imagination, would be like a madhouse without a manager.
    Sketchbook
    [last update; 9th February 2015]
    SEXUAL CONTENT !WARNING!
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    ...looking for a freelance work...
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  4. #301
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    More sketchbook pages:
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    So tired. It's like the energy got sucked out of me.
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  5. #302
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    And another!
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  6. #303
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    Haha, I think I am going to start running out of sketchbook pages to show soon.

    By actually drawing out my inspirational sources, I hope to understand why I respond so much to them visually and to deconstruct their meaning within their cultural context.

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    Ah, I need to find more interesting architectural designs like this! I want to understand the cultural context behind their aesthetic designs and physical structure.
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  7. #304
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    By actually drawing out my inspirational sources, I hope to understand why I respond so much to them visually and to deconstruct their meaning within their cultural context.

    If you have any more to say about it, could you please explain the process and purpose of this method of learning, a bit more in detail? It looks really interesting to me!
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  8. #305
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    Axelga2112: Yes, absolutely! Thank you for asking.

    The idea originated from a class assignment that my classmates had. Basically, you develop an art journal by gathering all your inspirational sources (usually collecting printouts) and writing down your thoughts about them. Well, I wanted to expand this by actually drawing examples of my inspirational sources. A lot of it write now is drawing Alexander McQueen's work. I'm afraid to say though that I'm merely copying what I see. So, later, what I did was try to apply the designs that I've learned and abstract them in order to really analyze them. Unfortunately, it is not nearly as satisfying as drawing my sources because I really love details.

    And by "deconstruct their meaning within their cultural context", I mean breaking down visual elements that are important to specific cultures. For example, Mayan art featured a lot of quadrilateral shape and snake scale motifs because their cosmology is based on the four serpents in the four corners of the world. I feel like by analyzing this stuff, I can start to understand how to make meaningful designs in concept art (hopefully).

    I know I should be drawing 'til my hands fall off, but researching this kind of stuff really gets me going. I just can't get enough of it. I really hope this will help my art to stand out in the long run . . . .


    Now enough of that. Time to make my daily post and go to bed!
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  9. #306
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    Quote Originally Posted by orochigenocide View Post

    I know I should be drawing 'til my hands fall off, but researching this kind of stuff really gets me going. I just can't get enough of it. I really hope this will help my art to stand out in the long run . . . .
    Nah, I think your right to do some researching too, especially if you're trying to deconstruct stuff in your head. You'll gain more from doing this than just copying stuff like a robot. It pays to understand what you are drawing. I used to just mechanically copy stuff and my art started to stagnate pretty bad, it's only when I started to actually ask my self things about what I was drawing that I actually started to learn and improve. Besides, when you get stuck for ideas, you'll have all this stuff to help jump start you imagination.

    Nice sketchbook by the way
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  10. #307
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    SpaceJelly: Thanks! Good to know that I'm on a good path here.

    My imagination's still weak. Haha. But geez, I still need to do something about my energy and sleep schedule.

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  11. #308
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    Oh man . . . I thought the forums would be down again for another couple of weeks. Thank goodness it isn't. O_O

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  12. #309
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    Last one . . .
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    Next up is an attempt at deconstruction.
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  13. #310
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    Great sketchbook! I specially like your actual sketchbook pages with all the design elements. Nice to see you draw inspiration from so many sources.
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  14. #311
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    Aqualeot: Thank you. Actually, a lot of those are just Alexander McQueen designs. Man, I love his work. But yes, it was a lot of fun drawing them, though very, very exhausting.

    Hi. I am back from my watercolor class in Florence! I've got some watercolor sketches goodies, but unfortunately, a lot of them aren't sketches of the beautiful architecture in Florence. I want to go back someday 'cause I've still go some unfinished business there.

    My first work in the watercolor class:
    Name:  combo_still life.jpg
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    Also, while I was there, I also went to Paris to see the Musée du Louvre, and yes, I DID SEE THE MONA LISA!!
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    -----

    Personal Guide Map to Improvement

    I went through my SB thread today, and I'm a little horrified at what I saw. A lot of bad, bad stuff. But that's okay, because all those bad works are a way to test out what works and what doesn't.

    After my last spring semester, spending six weeks in Florence, and looking through my SB today in a long while, I noticed a two things:

    1.) Oscillating between two different topics works. My focus during my last spring semester was solely on experimentation (despite one of my professor's distastes *AHEM*). Then after that semester, I spent a couple of weeks in the summer experimenting again by drawing out my inspirational sources and examining a little bit about some different cultural iconography. After that, I focused on technical skills in art-making again when I left for Florence. (It IS Florence after all!!) When it was time to make my final project for the watercolor class, I hit a breakthrough. Even though I only worked on it for a day, everything seemed to fall into place, and I think part of that is due to oscillating focuses for a period of time. Scott Young on oscillating obsessions.

    2.) My weaknesses revolve around decisiveness and simplicity. A good majority of past stuff here is rather bad and just sloppy. It wasn't until I was introduced to Bargue studies and planar analysis that my improvement started to shift gears. I think the reason is because these methods force you to make decisions with very few choices in the beginning stages of drafting. When I was looking at atelier works in Florence, I noticed that a lot of strong works revolved around these kinds of decisions that led to simplicity in the beginning stages, and ultimately, confidence. For example, when I did a figure painting at the Florence Atelier, Laura and Frank taught me that I needed to decide which areas are light and which are dark in the beginning stages. "Light/dark, light/dark, light/dark . . . " I also noticed this is crucial when working with watercolors because it's so easy to muddy up the colors. See James Gurney's entry on "ghost washes."

    3.) For the love of god, please know when to turn your brain off. I personally find this so important because for the duration of my stay in Florence, I felt so wired that it was hard to go to sleep. I often stayed up because I couldn't stop thinking about how to make improve my approaches to watercolor because whatever I did sucked. So, the next day, my energy often took a nose dive at the start of my day BECAUSE I was so wired the night before. In context to everything I've learned, energy is so crucial to problem-solving and productivity.


    So, here's what my tentative plan is for my upcoming semester, when I'll more than likely have lots of flexibility.

    Deliberate Practice:

    Month 1 - Ghost washes: Lots of watercolor sketches that uses mostly ghost washes. A majority will just be the establishing ghost washes with no details.

    Month 2 - Simplified Bargue studies & constructive anatomy: Coupling simplified Bargue studies that focuses on just light and dark areas (no halftones) with constructive anatomy and planar studies. My goal for this is to gain confident and unified rendering.

    Month 3 - Consistency: One of the biggest weaknesses young artists have before they go into game industry is consistency when drawing characters (or any other subject) in different views. My initial approach will be making maquettes, and then use other methods later (the Anthony Viscardi method, constructive drawing, etc.)

    All semester - Iconography analysis: From what I've learned so far, meaning and symbolism is highly dependent on a culture's structure and "rules." My goal from learning about iconography is to learn how it can affect, mood, atmosphere, and ultimately, meaning.

    Honorable Mention - The Anthony Viscardi method: This opts for a more natural way of drawing. Most of his demos back in Florence consisted of architectural drawings that discarded using the mathematical rules of perspective. His philosophy was that perspective created on a 2-D plane is a result of measuring space. So, a lot of his method involves using a lot of reference areas to measure from one space to another. However, since I've been working so much with line already, I won't have such a heavy focus on it. However, I think it's be beneficial to practice this method from time to time because it's almost like "feeling out " how the forms work rather than just copying how they look.

    Another thing that I liked about his teaching method is that he recognizes the pitfall of our personal vision being way ahead of our execution: "Imagination doesn't mean having a strong image in your head. Rather, it's what we find from working with our hands. It's that discovery process that allows us to extend our imagination in ways we could never have planned." What a personal paradigm shift!!


    The Difference Between Deliberate Practice and Work:

    Deliberate practice focuses on improving your weaknesses and building up expertise in a certain topic. It's key to catalyzing your improvement rate.

    Work (like making work for an employer or major school projects) IS NOT deliberate practice. Instead, work will more than often test what you already know and won't push you to another level.

    So remember, major assignments are probably not a good place and time to perform deliberate practice. That should probably be done beforehand. I've had to learn that the hard way . . .
    Last edited by BichNguyen; August 6th, 2013 at 12:08 AM.
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  15. #312
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    Arches at Piazza della Santissima Annunziata. Not watercolor, but I had a choice between inks, marker, or felt-tipped pen. I chose Sharpie!

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    Thoughts on the Spacing Effect and Deliberate Practice

    Look through my past and recent works as whole, it’s clear that I’ve been overestimating my artistic performance. Wanting to understand my results, I’m investigating WHY my results are the way they are.

    Even though I’ve known about the importance of deliberate practice for a good while now, I still haven’t gotten myself where I want to be. With that being said, I took a closer look at some of the literature currently out there on this very topic.

    Effectiveness of Adequate Learning vs. Over-Learning

    When I first read the article, “Increasing Retention Without Increasing Study Time” by Roher and Pashler, I was amazed at how taking a calculated amount of time for breaks can help you retain information longer. But when I read it for the second time, there were key points that I missed the first time.

    1.) Multiple error-free performance is over-learning. When practicing, it turns out that it’s actually better to move on to another type of practice after you achieve one error-free perform to spread out that similar type of practice over a period of time. For example, when you quiz yourself over using subjunctive moods in French and you get all the answers right in one trial run, it’s better to move onto another topic and save the subjunctive mood practice for another day.

    2.) Constant self-testing is more effective than restudying the answer with the questions. This might be a little tricky with art practice. However, considering that the article also tested math practice problems where there’s more significant amount of problem-solving than memorization, this could translate to practice that deals with the technical and draftsman side of art.

    3.) Space out your study and practice sessions. The amount of time you spend with breaks in between each study session is highly related to the time between when you first study a subject and when you’re tested. According to the article, the optimal amount for these breaks is 10 - 30% of the time between studying and testing. In fact, how you space out your study or practice session is immensely important, which is from the next article I’ll be referencing.

    Diaries of Violinists

    In the article “The Role of Deliberate Practice in the Acquisition of Expert Performance” by K. Anders Ericsson, Krampe, and Tesch-Romer, one of the studies they did was on three groups of violin students at the Music Academy in West Berlin: the best violinists, the good violinists, and the music teachers (music education students). They asked all three groups to keep a detailed diary that recorded all activities they’ve done for each 24-hour period. The activities were grouped into two categories, music-related and everyday activities, and later broken down into sub-categories. All three groups did music-related activities for an average of 50.6 hours per week, but here’s the kicker: it’s how they spent their time that separated the best and good violinists from the music teachers.

    1.) Practicing alone and deliberate practice - On average, the best and good violinists spent approximately 24.3 hours practicing alone while the music teachers spent significantly less time. It’s wasn’t just the amount of time they spent, but how they spread out that time. If you look at the graphs in the article, you’ll see that the best and good violinists had two distinct practice sessions: one during 9 AM and 2 PM (which peaked the most) and one during 4 PM and 10 PM. (See spacing out sessions is at work here?) In contrast, the music teachers had their practice sessions spread out evenly throughout the day.

    2.) Sleep - Contrary to the popular belief that sleep isn’t all that important, it’s actually very important factor that separates the best and good violinists from the music teachers. On average, these two groups slept for 60 hours per week while the music teachers only slept for 54.6 hours. Per day, the two groups slept for 8.6 hours while the music teachers slept for about 7.8 hours. Not only did these two groups sleep more, they also took longer naps, about 2.8 hours per week. They napped longer not because of deficiency in the amount sleep they had but to recover from mentally-straining practice. In fact, their nap time usually took place between 2 PM and 6 PM, which is roughly in between their two practice sessions for the day. During the weekends, however, these violinists reported that they napped less and roughly slept an hour more than usual.

    3.) Leisure time - Here is where best and good violinists separate. The best violinists spent on average 3.5 hours on leisure activities each day while the good violinists spent about 4.7 hours. Overall, all the young violinists spent more time on leisure activities on the weekends, as expected.

    Thoughts on Application

    Considering how distinct the schedules for the best and good violinists were compared to the music teachers, I think it would be nice to adopt them for the upcoming fall semester. Before then, I think it would wise to test them out first to see the pros and cons of this type of schedule. Another problem that would arise is that my only class next semester is from 11 AM to 2 PM, which is during the most intense time for practice. Unless I can figure out how to make the class as intense as possible, I would probably need to find an alternative way to reconfigure the schedule.

    And since I’m planning to work with one specific topic each month, I think allowing for just one “error-free” practice for a subtopic and spreading them out throughout the period might yield some interesting results. For example, I’m practicing with ghost washes in watercolor for the first month of the fall semester. Since it is a rather narrow topic itself, my subtopics will probably just be related to painting colored compositions holistically.

    Tentatively, I think my breakdown will look something like this:

    Each active day:
    9 - 10 hours of art-related activities (with breaks included)
    4 hours of practicing alone (deliberate practice, included with art-activities)
    8.5 - 9 hours for sleep
    0.5 hours for a nap
    3.5 hours for leisure time (less time on Mon., Tues., Wed.)

    Rest day:
    9.5 - 10 hours for sleep
    7 - 8 hours for leisure time
    8 hours for catching up on chores

    Art-related activities:
    Practicing alone (deliberate practice)
    Class time
    Class assignments and projects
    Group practice
    Practicing alone for fun
    Group practice for fun
    Side project
    Looking at art in games/playing games for this particularly
    Looking at fine arts
    Studying iconography/reading art history
    Reading art instructional books

    Sources:
    -Doug Roher and Harold Pashler. "Increasing Retention Without Increasing Study Time." 2007.

    -K. Anders Ericsson, Ralf Th. Krampe, and Clemens Tesch-Romer. "The Role of Deliberate Practice in the Acquisition of Expert Performance." 1993.
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