Starting Over

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Starting Over

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    guitarmaggedon
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Question Starting Over

    I would say I come here humbly, but I scurried over due to a recent surge of optimism and pride I wish to capitalize upon before ... I start hating everything I draw again

    I have drawn semi-seriously over the years, and had fallen into a lapse due to the various rigors that high school presented (twas the algebra what done it). Summer happened, as did summer school ... an unseasonably cool day happened as well that offered me an opportunity to walk to the library without fear of melting or dying or burning like Nosferatu. I found me some new fiction and 'Remembrances', a collection of Alfred Eisenstaedt's photography (I happen to really like photography), and it really got me back into the drawing mood. Drawing from photography isn't ideal, but darn it, I wanted to. Being thoroughly foreign to drawing old wrinkly men, that was what I chose to attempt. The first old wrinkly man was Bertrand Russel ... and the first try looked like Harrison Ford but I assure you my second go at it turned out much better. Not like Harrison Ford at all. George Macaulay Trevelyan didn't look half bad either. I was pleasantly surprised to find that whatever skills I had acquired hadn't upped and left in my lapse, I'm not feeling like such a failure as an artist right now, I didn't suck as bad as I thought I would. Surely, I will feel like that again in due time, but I will be optimistic at the moment.

    I am not an absolute beginner, but that is the attitude I will adopt. I suppose I do draw better than my other teenage peers, but when is that ever good enough? My lurking about here has left me in awe many occasions and reminds me I have a lot to learn and how better than to completely 'start over'? I don't quite know how my informal 'training' started, so a fresh start with the help of some talented people seems like a good idea right about now. The real problem is I'm not quite sure how to start ... and I know myself well enough to know that I need to create structure and guidelines else I lose focus and futz around (as a matter of character, I am trying to build up to better than that). I totally love structure and list-making and planning, I'd be such a great bureaucrat. Anyway, in the end, I'm coming to you nice people to perhaps help me create some structure in my renewed artistic ambitions, and to help me find a way to best approach my training with the basics in mind.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    699
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 173 Times in 120 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    There have been a number of similar threads, so checking those out via 'search' wouldn't hurt. If you really want to "start over," though, here's a list of standard advice:

    - Go find/download the core books like Loomis, possibly Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, read them, do the exercises in them.
    - This involves getting your basic forms/values down with simple objects like spheres and boxes
    - Then move on to more advanced things like still lifes, landscapes, figure work
    - Practice practice practice: keep a sketchbook and take it with you everywhere. Shove it under your pillow if you have to.
    - Eventually work on color and painting.


    ...honestly though, these steps get told to everyone, but it's not like they're rules set in stone. The more you work, the more your "artist's eye" will develop. If you want to practice by drawing old guys, well hey, that's actually a pretty good challenge because you'll learn all sorts of things about value, texture, and form, not to mention figure work. Besides, studies can get pretty boring if that's all you ever do.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    645
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 54 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    MAM start with what interest you, then aim for profection ( then if you get bored) try something new. The art field is limitless and if you ever reach the end, well you will be the first person that has.

    Good luck with everything.

    Bruce

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    10,623
    Thanks
    3,686
    Thanked 5,614 Times in 3,774 Posts
    Follows
    2
    Following
    0
    Well I took over 20 years to get back in. Took a while to get back into the saddle, but I now realise that there are serious gaps that were never addressed years ago and am now doing so. Just push yourself and find those gaps and then plug them.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    428
    Thanks
    120
    Thanked 95 Times in 77 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by FlameRaven View Post
    There have been a number of similar threads, so checking those out via 'search' wouldn't hurt. If you really want to "start over," though, here's a list of standard advice:

    - Go find/download the core books like Loomis, possibly Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, read them, do the exercises in them.
    - This involves getting your basic forms/values down with simple objects like spheres and boxes
    - Then move on to more advanced things like still lifes, landscapes, figure work
    - Practice practice practice: keep a sketchbook and take it with you everywhere. Shove it under your pillow if you have to.
    - Eventually work on color and painting.


    ...honestly though, these steps get told to everyone, but it's not like they're rules set in stone. The more you work, the more your "artist's eye" will develop. If you want to practice by drawing old guys, well hey, that's actually a pretty good challenge because you'll learn all sorts of things about value, texture, and form, not to mention figure work. Besides, studies can get pretty boring if that's all you ever do.
    He could have serious difficulty learning the form if he were to start drawing old men from life, I think. I think those wrinkles could be very distracting.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook