Armor Study?
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    Armor Study?

    Greetings CA

    I was just wondering, if there were any good armor studies. If someone has written a book, made videos, etc. about all there is about body armor?

    I personally love all the ornamental and cool designs I see people drawing. But I'd like to get a grasp on what armor is actually supposed to look like, and protect.

    edit: When I say armor, I mean the whole shebang. Medieval armor, Modern soldier armor, primitive armor, etc.

    Helpful hints, book titles, hotlinks, All appreciated. Thank you

    Last edited by Irishdrunk; July 11th, 2009 at 05:39 AM.
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    I'm also interested in seeing if anyone can provide sources.

    But I think our best bet for now is to pick up a book on different types of armour(they usually have a lot of these directed toward little kids who want to learn more) and find art books with concepts from movies and games.

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    I think what would be a good idea is probably looking up a smithy online, they usualy have pictures of their armor/weapons, not sure about primitive armor. And looking up ancient warriors would be a good start.

    Here is site with lots of pictures that I found:

    http://www.armor.com/armor.html

    Alot of Roman Helmets in this one:

    http://www.hellenic-art.com/armour/


    And what helps me is just looking at armor already drawn, and mabye watch a few people in armor in action. And to tell you the truth I just serched these up, and im about to use them myself.

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    AzuzaPesant is correct. Look up resources for people that make armor. There are a lot of them out there. You can also look for books on museum collections that include armor and auction catalogs that include armor etc etc. You can also find a lot of images online where people have visited large and small museums all over europe and taken pictures.

    Here are some very handy pictures from Flickr

    Last edited by pat@hpnc.com; July 11th, 2009 at 04:47 PM.
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    Look at artwork by Angus McBride for a lot of ancient/medieval armors. He's pretty much my favorite artist to look at for armor related things. (I'm surprised more concept artists on here don't seem to know him) There are a lot of other books on armor and military stuff by other artists in the Osprey books as well. Also look up artwork by Johnny Shumate and Graham Turner for more armor stuff.

    There's an awesome book called "Greece and Rome at War" by Peter Conolly with full color illustrations and some photos. Good stuff. Not too sure about modern armor though, but I would imagine that's easier to find on the interwebz.

    Here's a picture from the Greece and Rome book-

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    By the way for Roman armor go here http://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat/ . You can find out more than you could ever want to know Also take with a grain of salt any illustrations even ones that are supposed to be accurate.

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    Hey thank you guys. This really helps ^^

    SECONDS: Do you work from life of photographs?
    FRAZETTA: I work from my head.

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    (Disclaimer: I know very little about armor, but these observations might be helpful)

    Armor (much like anatomy) obeys the same rules of structure and function. The weapons used in any given time period dictate what needs to be protected and how mobile the wearer needs to be for certain ranges of motion.

    The head and torso are the most commonly protected because of the high concentration of vital organs: You can survive a hand amputation but not a lung penetration.

    Consider medieval knights (such as the French knight). You'd see the whole body covered in armor plates with extensive chain mail underneath. Since the broad sword was a commonly used weapon, knights needed to protect against amputation. Chain mail helps protect from slashes, while the armor plates and shield help protect against stabs.

    Once guns became prevalent, having armor and chain mail lining the limbs became less important. A gunshot wound to the arm is unlikely to take the whole arm off. Armor protecting the torso (and head) became much more important. This is apparent with the modern swat team - where they essentially have a bullet proof vest, helmet with face shield, and sometimes a bullet proof see-through shield. They don't have armor protecting the limbs because they need the agility to get to cover.

    Another great example is WWI. When chemical weapons began use (such as mustard gas), the gas mask was invented and standardized to protect against those hazards.

    It's very important that you consider mobility and range of motion with any armor design. With the medieval knights, you have separate plates overlapping at key joints so that the plates slide past one another. Another option is having less/no armor at the inside of joints (as can be seen in many games, such as the Master Chief design in Halo).

    Summary: Consider what weapons are used and the range of motion needed to wield them properly. Consider the damage that those same weapons would do to you and how to protect against it. Studying armor from a historical perspective will probably help tremendously.

    Edit - You might also want to watch Spike TV's Deadliest Warrior to give you a good starting point

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    Oooo, Deadliest Warrior did have some great armor simulations. But not nearly as in-depth as I hoped.

    I was hoping for a similar concept as Deadliest Warrior, but focusing more on the armor. Taking several different armors; differing in material, thickness, weight, area protection, etc. Then discussing the armor's protection against varying weapons.

    I guess I'll just use speculation and common sense to study armor. Thanks again guys.

    SECONDS: Do you work from life of photographs?
    FRAZETTA: I work from my head.

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    Clux Delux is right. Angus McBride is the shit when it comes to armour studies. Go to a library and check out some of the books full of his awesome illustrations. Also, there are tons of other reference books on armour with great illustrations. It's a lot easier to find them in books then online. Again, goooooooooo tooooo the liiiiiibraaaaary

    Also, Barnes & Noble often has good, cheap reference books on a variety of subjects on their bargain shelves. I've seen a few arms and armour ones


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    as you can see most of the medieval armors have similar named parts


    Last edited by Vay; July 12th, 2009 at 10:19 PM.
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