samurai character design
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Thread: samurai character design

  1. #1
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    samurai character design

    Hi,

    I've been working on a turnaround for a samurai figure that I would like to
    turn into a 3d game model. However, I'm beginning to get overwhelmed by the amount of detail which is present in Yuroi japanese armor.

    Specifically, I found that I need to create studies of the head, the sandals and other parts of the figure to give the necessary amount of detail.

    Also I feel I need to create separate studies to show how the samurai would look without many of the armor pieces to describe detail hidden under the large parts of armor in a 3d model.

    I'm curious about how other artists would tackle these problems...

    -so

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    here are some more details

    more detailed studies of the figure

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  3. #3
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    Turnarounds Make Me Dizzy

    softocean,

    Several things:

    First, I suggest for a character that has a costume that is very symmetrical, or that has the same detail on one side of his body as it does the other, you should try doing that detail on only the one side you're more comfortable drawing. Then you can copy & paste & flop it on the other side, and then meld those two sides together. Then you can do whatever corrections you need to, and you're most of the way there on your front or back view.

    Also, it's nice that you have a graphics tablet, and it's also nice that you can use it for some things. But the tablet is limiting, as you cannot hold it or work with it like you would paper, being able to twist and turn the paper in order to get a proper angle to your line. You can only work at so many limited angles without your hand and wrist feeling like it's going to fall off. What ends up being lost is pertinent detail that you would have much more easily accomplished, had you simply drawn these things in pencil on actual paper, then scanned everything.

    The tablet is a tool. The ultimate goal is the accuracy of your work, and so long as the work is high quality good, no one really gives a damn that part of it is in pencil, or digitally done... so long as it does the job that's intended. If you can do that job digitally, great. However, I don't think you're even close to hitting the mark with the level of sophistication a 3D modeler needs to do his job from what you would be giving him here.

    However, if you do what you've done digitally as a precursor to printing everything out so you may do a much more refined illustration, then I think that's your smarter approach. As I see things now, you don't have much in the way of the kind of nuance and detail that a 3D modeler would need to complete the character.

    There's nothing wrong with doing a monotone line for all the fine detail that's needed, scanning everything in, then LIGHTLY doing some dimensional shading with gray tones in Photoshop. But the accuracy and details of the form need to be nailed first and foremost. Otherwise, you're compounding mistake upon mistake, thinking that you're completing something solid, when you're not. The details and nuance and accurate form is the foundation you need.

    If it helps, I'm including something I did for a 3D character for a commercial product's advertising campaign. I colored the figure in Photoshop, and I did the turnarounds in pencil. The boots were a last-minute change, adopting an earlier design I had done.

    Details, details! If your linework is all blunt, chunky and vague like it is now, then a 3D modeler would have no choice but to interpret your design. That could be a good thing or not, depending on the needs of the client, and the abilities of the 3D modeler. Generally, you would want to err on the side of more detail and nuance, not less. What I see of your work is solidly good, but it looks like it's in its very preliminary stages.

    Also, when you submit your final work, you should do so at a very high resolution. 300dpi at least.

    Good luck!

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    Last edited by magnut; July 6th, 2009 at 10:23 PM.
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    I like samurai's.



    Magnut I think covered everything, at least until you post again.

    Cheers!

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    Liquidspider,

    Thanks.

    Unfortunately, softocean seems not willing to participate in a dialogue. Too many people will come on ConceptArt, solicit some sort of initial critique or advice, and then never really reply beyond that.

    I do appreciate softocean's thanks, but I was looking more forward to finding out his reaction to the critique, and then what's in his mind as to how he plans on proceeding with his project. Maybe also to see his further progress, because what he's started off with is quite interesting. I'd love to see the progress of this as he's finishing up the turnarounds.

    But, it seems like a lost opportunity. Hopefully I'm wrong about that. Maybe he'll do that, but just not right now.

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