I'm tired of trying to learn to draw.
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    I'm tired of trying to learn to draw.

    I get myself all hyped up, and end up drawing something horrible and making a lame excuse why I can't do it and I always end up going no where and do not improve. I'm going to college in the Fall and I think I'll be able to take an EXTRA class, dedicating myself to learning and love of expression through art. Should I take that extra class?

    [VIAR 111-112 | Drawing One, Two
    (0, 6, 3)
    A broad study of composition and visual concepts as related to freehand and perspective drawing techniques. Prerequisites: VIAR 111 is the prerequisite for VIAR 112. ]

    Also, where should I start now? I usually go straight to still-life and end up not doing so well. I draw something else and another failure. I don't really need motivation because I am motivated I just need to be pointed in the right direction.

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    I say start a sketchbook here on CA and post some of your work - then we'll be able to provide feedback if you'd like specific crits/comments for progress.

    As for struggling with creating things you feel are not great - try to have patience as we all went or are going through those times of learning where what we do looks kinda rubbish ... keep at it and you'll get there! Make sure you have fun with your art too

    I'll wait to say more until I see some examples and know a little more about where you are with your art - all the best!

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    I've seen the sketchbook section and all of the replies and constructive criticism and almost scanned mine but apprehension came up since they look NOTHING like other threads. Thanks for the response I'll scan some within the hour.

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    I have found that sometime's one is so accustomed to they way you do thing's that you don't push past it.

    Motivation and inspiration might get you drawing again yay, but then you draw the same way you always do. Dunno if it's the same way for you but sometimes you have to force yourself to make better lines, better decisions etc. I'm also rather forgetfull so you need to desighn a working plan for yourself that has worked for you, ultimately you need to have a working plan that you personally develop and follow though till the end. It's the schlep side of things but you need something to fall back on for when you are tired or aimless. It's actually your default behaviour that needs to improve. For example if someone came and ask you out of nowhere what your cat looks like, what will you do, do you default to a outline drawing, construction?, volume's etc. Everyone at some point of time consulted a piece of paper to try and illustrate something to someone, that is a good example and indication of just "where" your default behaviour is. That's the stuff that needs to enhance.

    That thing about drawing being 90% what goes through your mind before you put the line down is ringing more true for me these days. I saw it and understood it, something about what loomis said, that the more design consideration you spend on the initial planning of a piece the better the piece will be, that's the same for every line you draw.

    What I have found sometimes also that too much guidance can kill development, sometimes I set out a project to draw heads for example but then I wake up with the uncontrollable urge to draw hands because something in my mind "clicked", and I have to draw them to notice what I discovered about them there and then or I might lose the opportunity.

    Last edited by George Abraham; June 24th, 2009 at 10:58 AM.
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    Scetchbook: View the exhibitionist's stuff.
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    Quote Originally Posted by XenoFenix View Post
    I've seen the sketchbook section and all of the replies and constructive criticism and almost scanned mine but apprehension came up since they look NOTHING like other threads.
    Uniqueness. Off to a good start already.

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    Well, you need to realize and get over the fact that you're going to draw bad things all the time for the rest of your life. Even when you're this awesome pro in the future (hopefully), you will sometimes draw things that are not to your standards. Right now you are learning so obviously you are going to make bad drawings, but they may have potential. Don't worry about one drawing; look at your work from a year ago (if any) and see the progression. What are some things you are better at? What are some things that still give you problems? What are some things you have avoided?

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    I see a contradiction in your post. You say you are motivated and that isn't the problem, yet in the same post you have "I'm tired of trying to learn how to draw". That doesn't sound like motivation at all to me...unless you were just exaggerating.

    In my opinion, that phrase is a pretty powerful statement. Not "I am having troubles learning how to draw" or "I'm frustrated...etc". But "I am tired of it".

    I can tell you something, there were always frustrating days where I was trying to accomplish something and was having a hard time with it, but I can honestly say I have NEVER in my life said "I am tired of trying to learn how to draw". Not once. If you are genuine in that feeling, then maybe you should take a long break or just keep it at hobby status for awhile.

    Seriously, I see so many people on here that are just STRUGGLING to pick up a pencil and I just can't sympathize with it. When I was 16, (and to this day) I was constantly thinking about drawing, painting, sculpting, sketching. I didn't go to the parties, I was social with friends, but I turned a lot of events down, I didn't do a whole ton of dating, etc....and none of this was a problem for me. It felt natural and it felt RIGHT to me to be doing this.

    I'm not trying to say "stop drawing", far from it...but if you are struggling with the end result so much, then you need to reassess what it is you even like about art in the first place. Get to a point where you could live your entire life just doing art and you'll get better by default. Work on feeling positive about the act of drawing first...then when you start seeing the natural result of that (getting better), then you can focus a little more on pinpointing your problems.

    That's my 2 cents anyway...

    -D

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    here's the thing about college classes, though... 9 times out of 10 the teachers aren't that good. most of the introductory drawing classes where i went to school are taught by the grad students so they can get a grad fellowship and free tuition. ...and they suck.

    (my painting teacher did art with colored plastic and didn't know how to paint. so, what's the point in having her teach painting you might ask?)

    there are schools with great faculty and there are random awesome teachers in schools all over the place. but, honestly, the best litmus test is to look at their work and see if it looks even halfway close to the technique, style, or finish that you want to learn. if you want to paint abstractly, you probably don't want to hang out (at first) in a class where you copy plaster casts.

    i don't know if you're an art/illustration major or if you're studying something else and want to do this on the side (that's how i was for 5 years--majored in engineering and japanese and was turned down from taking the art classes due to prerequisites). your best bet is to talk to some of the faculty. not counsellors, but the actual teachers. if the teacher says it's okay, they have authority over any admissions counsellor who says otherwise. if you go to a counsellor, they'll feed you a line of bullshit telling you to take each class in sequence.

    when you talk to them, bring in samples of your work. also bring in samples (print them out or bring books) of artists you are influenced (not inspired...literally influenced) by and talk. if you find a good teacher, they'll be able to talk with you about which classes to take, etc. most teachers (good and bad) like to teach (for good and bad reasons). they're almost always willing to give an opinion (at the very least because it makes them sound smart).

    anyway. need more info before i can offer any useful advice. what are you planning to study? where are you located? what does your current artwork look like? where do you want to go with your artwork? what kind of job would you like to have?

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    *inserts obligatory read Art & Fear post here

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    From Sterling Hundley's blog:


    10/24/2008
    COMPULSION OR DISCIPLINE

    I find that I must make myself create art. It is not a compulsion, but a discipline. Many of the illustrators, painters, and artists that I know react the same way. I love drawing in my sketchbook, creating ideas, observing, etc., because it is for me (although I choose to share my sketchbooks with others). They are meant to be utilitarian.

    I seem to want to do anything but start a painting: that's the hard part. I know that each time I work, I am in for a battle. Every successful painting that I have created has gone through an "ugly" stage. If it comes out on the other side, then it has passed the test of trial by fire. If it does not come out of this ugly stage, then it is a failure. This happens more than I would like to admit. Time is no friend of mine...

    A blank canvas means judgement, especially if the work has an application. I know that others will see the work, good or bad. Getting myself into the studio takes true will power, and I find that establishing some kind of schedule can be of some assistance. I used to keep office hours when my studio was outside of the house. Nowadays, my studio is in my home, and the line between personal life and work is blurry indeed.
    I think for most, and probably all at some point, drawing something ugly is step 1. Step 2, the fixing of step 1, is the hard part.

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    my best advice I can give you that helped me is:

    * squint when you are drawing, this will give your work a silhouette when working and without a good one, it will be not be interesting

    * make the first mark--before I do a sketch I just start laying down some strokes to practice

    * retain and remember the principles of design while you are problem solving

    after many many many many failed attempts you will notice a positive change in your failing pattern. whether it be an interesting texture or a focal point created by high contrast...keep this in your memory bank, circle it, whatever you have to do to bring it into your future drawings

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    o.O good thread.. i was expecting something else.. and now i will be the one not adding shit to the thread.. ohwell... go ca.org

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    Wow, I have to thank you all for posting and all of this information I will keep in mind the next time my pencil sets paper. I haven't started a sketchbook thread yet, but I will in the nearby future (If my scanner will never do something decent.). I have gone over the art I had years before and I must say that I did improve greatly, and almost laughable at what I had then and I assume I will be doing that to my art now in a few years (hopefully sooner). I'm actually not going to have a career in artwork in any shape or form, Microbiology is going to be my major in college. It is a whole different path, but I would like drawing to become a part of me because I really enjoy doing it despite the ugly little lines that I put on the paper, because they are my little ugly lines. I never go back to my recent artwork and fix the needed areas, should I be doing this?

    Also, if anyone can PM me or write up a post about scanning sketchbooks, that would help me a lot.
    Thank you all 8D.

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    Overpowering purpose helps, even if it's short term or something you need to do really quick to get the timing out of it. Sometimes art as with humor has a timing factor. It's a high risk invetment portfolio so timing and strategy is everything. No use crying over spilt peas.

    I realised this with simple comic strips. Without the overpowering desire to communicate something, the direction and resources doesn't always want to do anything. Illustration is about illustration.

    Unless it's studying. the energy is differant with studying, but it's a good idea to combine illustration with studying(Target group), that way your works might look better and more "showy" even if it's study.
    I have also noticed that sometimes the best studies that have made you learn the most valuable stuff are not stuff you would even show your mother, never mind uploading but it serves it's purpose right.

    Whatever you do,do it well or fast as long as it's on time and serves it’s purpose, quality can be second to that and it get’s better with time but I think getting that feeling of hitting the target is important even if you don’t match up with the greats, but things improve, target’s differ.. I'm not really good at phased work that spans over days and days, I guess that's what I need to try. Perhaps doing some POW’s or something. I think I picked up something from looking at loomis, he is aware of the effect he want's to impart on the viewer. It's strange how the energy of intent can change how and what you do. He fu#$ing knows, that what he's doing looks fawking awesome, the bastard and he makes it dance around and tease you a little and he's gone beyond that point where fellow artists can humble him with crit's etc.

    If I only knew how to make something that’s phased really fun and consuming.

    If the scanner won't budge you can always take photo's and crop.

    Last edited by George Abraham; June 26th, 2009 at 08:59 AM.
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    Scetchbook: View the exhibitionist's stuff.
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  25. #15
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    I find this can help:
    Name:  Scan-fix1.jpg
Views: 778
Size:  77.0 KB

    Lol - but more seriously, what are you having problems with?

    If you could explain you difficulties with the scanner in a little more detail we may be able to help?

    I say give it a go and post the result - a good likelihood that someone will have advice The other option is if you have a digital camera ... (edit: Aha Zaorr already mentioned this!)

    meanwhile keep up the sketching and enjoy your art

    Last edited by The7Artist7; June 26th, 2009 at 09:13 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by XenoFenix View Post
    I'm actually not going to have a career in artwork in any shape or form, Microbiology is going to be my major in college. It is a whole different path, but I would like drawing to become a part of me because I really enjoy doing it despite the ugly little lines that I put on the paper, because they are my little ugly lines.
    Just a suggestion for you: have you considered perhaps being a scientific illustrator? From my understanding, many scientific illustrators are trained in the arts side of it rather than the scientific side. If you keep up your drawing skills in addition to your studies, you could be an uncommon example of a scientific illustrator trained in sciences.

    Scientific illustration is still fun to do, requires creativity and may still evoke the sense of pride you feel when you see your own lines on a paper. You could even do contract freelance scientific illustration jobs while you're in school/on the side of your 'regular' career.

    I'm not sure if you were aware of this option, so maybe give it some consideration? Whatever you choose, remember to pick the option that brings you the most happiness and fulfillment. Goodluck!

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