Sketchbook: Raffix - trying to steadily improve - Page 2
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Thread: Raffix - trying to steadily improve

  1. #31
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    mm i have a second page : )

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  2. #32
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    a quick sp, really quick, ~3 mins then my mirror was stolen -.-

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  3. #33
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    well, this one is.......bad.

    it's my first ever try with oil paints, and, although this is still a wip, it has gone.....badly.
    oh well. finished some time this week so please check here again soon

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    I like your handling on the hair in that last portrait. The face is really well sketched, but I think some details are getting changed in the painting that are making it less successful.

    Oil paints are hard to get the hang of. Normally oil painters lay down a dark base color, like a coppery red brown, and work on that. It means that you can lay down a lot less media which is good because it'll take SOOO long to dry. You can leave parts of the canvas untouched, but you'll need to work more heavily in ares you want to be light. With the white paper, you just have to work so much harder to describe the skin.

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  6. #35
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    I think your doing good, just try to have fun with the art, seems like it'll grow on you...

    those life drawings/poses from the last page looked darn good!

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    MoKhi - thanks a lot for the tips on oils. I really do want to become better with them so all advice is really appreciated. Looked in your sketchbook, wow!! i love all your sketches of animals, especially the owls, soo good

    (also love the macbeth reference )

    Lakka - thanks a lot, that means a lot to me. Had a peek in your sketchbook and i love your enviros and landscapes, some of them are really atmospheric.

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    sorry for double post without art, and this isn't another of my many shameless bumps -


    When working with oils on the second layer, should my paints be thicker, or should I thin them out more than in the first layer?

    don't suppose anyone will read this before i start paiting again, but any help would be most welcome.

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    well, my experiment with oil paint didn't go too well, but i will not give up! another oil paint will be along soon.
    In the meantime I have some more sketches from school. All from life, they're not that great but everyone moves around so much

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    10-15 mins from life
    i suck at perspective:

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    Hi Raffix,

    Alot of good stuff happening with your portraits. Solid approach using large forms and straights. Stuff that takes some folks a struggle to get.

    Your life drawings are pretty good.
    What I see is great observational skills. I like that you use large shapes to draw with. And you are controlling your lines. All pluses. Handling your pencil in this way is key to getting a cleaner gesture of the figure, especially in a life drawing session. You ARE getting a lot of information for 2 minutes.
    I like this one:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/att...1&d=1256243618
    It has a strong sense of form and solidity. Trick is to pull out all the extra lines and still retain this sense ofsolid form. That's a good analytical exercise to figure this out.

    I personally don't think you need a paint-over. I think just keeping a few concepts in mind as you hit these life sessions is what will bring you forward. I've a feeling you pick up ideas quickly.

    As for "shading" it IS better to spend time on getting the proportions & spatial relationships as close to accurate as possible. Values help explain the lighting situation, such as source ex. sun, lamp etc.
    You won't get much time in 2 imnute sketches for some of that information.
    Shadow pattern should also re-inforce the gesture and help to explain the form. In hard lighting with dramatic shadows, the core should also be a gesture.

    SB views are just a matter of time. Keep posting stuff in here and posting in other books. Reciprocation is a good thing. In any case, keep adding to this book. It will get noticed.

    And, yes. Never give up.

    Figure's 'n' Stuff SketchBook

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    "Just because something doesn't do what you planned it to do doesn't mean it's useless."-Thomas A. Edison

    "Convention is craft. Invention is art. In art, knowledge assists invention"-John E. Carlsson
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  14. #41
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    You have very good observational skills for your age. Mix the life drawing up with still lives to practice form.

    With oils it's fat over lean, so your first layer should be thinner. If you want to do it in one go, you need to get the colour and value right first time.

    If you want more comments, you have to comment on other's SBs - for every 5 you might get one back, but you have to keep up with it. If you want someone older than your mother nagging you, visit mine.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Two very quick pen drawings, they're both from photos and neither is very good, but i like to keep my sketchbook ticking over....i also thought the mahoosive boxer was rather amusing

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    worked up that fineliner drawing a little and tried to sort out the horrendous perspective.....phone pic so not great

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    That's very good. Maybe a light sketch in pencil first would help with the perspective, you can always rub it out later.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Hmm...16. That is a difficult age, for many hopeful artists. If you're not one of the crazy 17 year old kids capable of professional level digitals in a matter of minutes who for some reason is almost never living in America, you're usually in the same boat as...just about everyone else your age.

    Online sketchbooks are difficult enough as it is, and while it might be nice to think that the age thing would attract more people, it's really no different than anyone else's. Disappointing, yes?

    *Please be advised that a good bit of what I'm going to say following this, will contrast very directly with what a lot of other people will say. Take it for what you will.

    Well, for reasons I'm not entirely sure of...perhaps that I am at work, and there's not a whole lot to do at a phone job when the phones are dead, I will give you some advice. Perhaps not the type of advice you're hoping for, but advice nonetheless.

    First thing's first. Do not expect responses, criticisms, helpful paintovers, or many thousands of thread views just because you're posting your artwork. Or really...at all. Sure it'll happen from time to time. But unless you happen to be one of the incredibly talented professionals or popular individuals who've been here for quite some time, or have a system of connections set up for a steady stream, it just isn't likely to be like you want it. Even if you're posting art consistently. This is the internet. And you're floating around in what is one of the largest communities of artists, hobbyists, students, fans, and professionals in the world. And unfortunately, as nature would have it, as creative as artists can be it also comes with a bit of an ego that can (sometimes) result in focusing all attention very...inwardly. Really quite a shame.

    And so if the only reason you're posting this sketchbook is for lots of responses, if you're posting art for the recognition and for all however many hundreds of people who look at it to actually say something, you should rethink your priorities. To be an artist is much more than posting art for the sake of replies, it is posting art for the sake of the art itself. For the ideas, for the expression, or just because you feel like it while you're practicing. Is it wrong to enjoy getting replies and criticisms? Absolutely not, we all do. Is it wrong to be posting and expecting them to happen consistently? I won't call anything like that..."wrong" - that would be rude, I'll just say it's not going to be worth very much.

    It is a depressing life off and on, and it takes a long time, a lot of unrecognized effort in order to actually start getting replies and genuine help. I think it is reasons such as this that causes a lot of people to fall off to the wayside and never live their dream. A shame, but it can't be helped, really.

    And now for some advice concerning your art and direction as a whole:

    I think right now, you need to sit down and really ask yourself "What do I want to do? What do I want to be good at? Posting fantastical environments? Creative characters? Disgusting creatures? Wicked mechs? Fine art, of some sort? What do I REALLY want to create. What are the ideas I want to portray." Figure this out, and figure it out fast. Or at least have a vague idea of it. Because here's what happens otherwise.

    I notice you're doing a lot of portraits and life drawings. Well, that's all well and good. And they're not turning out terribly. But I'll say it flat out. I can't count on all my digits, even remotely, the amount of sketchbooks I've seen lasting multiple YEARS, in which the individual starts out with lots of self portraits and life drawing. And you know what? Two or three years later. They are able to do self portraits and life drawing. And sure their NEW portraits and life drawings might be a little cleaner, slightly more confident. But have they really learned anything from all that "studying"? an they do more...outside of it? I couldn't tell you, because in the multiple years of artwork, I never saw it. I'll let you interpret that however you want.

    Short version: If what you want to do is be able to draw your face or sketch naked people. Then draw your face and sketch naked people. But if what you want to do is be able to draw from your imagination, create a monster, or design a costume, or portray a race of people that doesn't exist. You have to do THAT. Studying isn't bad, but it's completely and utterly worthless if it isn't helping you to achieve your long term goal as a whole. And if your long term goal is to do more than studies, then you need to do more than studies. It's that simple. Deliciously simple.

    This is why I told you to ask yourself what you wanted. And perhaps tell us, as well, more specifically. If I know that what you want to do is paint naked people or draw things from life for your career. I will step away and let you proceed, commenting singularly on the technique. But if what you want to do is more than that, then you need to do more than that.

    Your technique:

    Not bad. Given your age, you have some talent. And I'm sure you are aware of this, hence, your interest in pursuing it. One thing I notice most often, your lines. You currently have this thing that a lot of people have when they're younger, this thing with lines. LINES! And then some more lines. If you want to draw a circle, you can theoretically do it all in one nice line. Probably it'll take more than that, but you can always keep a nice seamless flow to portray just that one line. You do not need twenty lines to make an edge, you just need one.

    You probably don't try to do it, and when you're younger and don't have years worth of experience it can be a little bit difficult to be confident enough to keep that pencil down on the paper. But unless the style you're going for involves lots of them scribblies and whispy lines for the sake of defining just one (which usually then appears really thick), you should probably try to control your lines and use them much more efficiently. It happens here and there in some of your studies when you seem to just let it flow and get your forms down - an entire leg in just two or three lines, but it could really stand to be more consistent.

    It is worthwhile, perhaps, or perhaps not...but I'll mention it anyway - that I am not a professional artist. I'm not even really that great. I'm just getting started, and there's so many people out there with much more experience who blow me completely out of the water. Still, though, I felt it appropriate to share this with you. How you interpret it or its worth is up to you. I'm fine with being the crazy batshit.

    In the meantime, if this is your dream, define your dream - and pursue it with everything you have. Every aspect of it. Regardless of criticism, comments, money, or anything of the sort. Dreams are there for good reason, and there's no point in having them if you settle for anything less than exactly what you want.

    Cheers for now.

    Edit: Wow that's long! Haha! ...my bad.

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  21. #46
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    On that oil-painting self-portrait - its not gone that badly - put another layer onto it. You will find that in doing so, it will average out and solidify the features. Try it, you have nothing to lose, and quite a bit to gain. Use the paint at out-of-the-tube consistency, or slacken it off just slightly with white spirit or turps, or a 50/50 mix of these with linseed oil. Take your brushstrokes in different directions from those on your first layer.

    If you come along to the V&A on friday, I'll go through some painting basics with you.


    Dave

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    Whoa Two Listen seemed to have a bit too much spare time at his job.
    Thnx for passing by and leaving a comment
    your work looks amazingly good for a 16 year old!
    try working some more on the way you shade, it can really define or undefine your shapes.
    And as Two listen suggested, step out of your studylife comfort zone and do some sketches form your imagination. Dont be scared if it fails, you need to build it up just as everything else.

    Cheers and good luck

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    Thanks a lot guys, and hopefully see you on friday dave.
    It sounds like I should be trying new things so I will def start drawing more from imagination.

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    It gets harder when to try to incorporate your studies into imaginative pieces. Do both and learn from both, and don't forget to have fun.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Well i've had loads of good advice from everone so am starting to do more drawing from my imagination.
    A page of heads. All mostly front views as these are my first few. (And yes, i know the bottom left one is crap).
    Thanks all

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    this really doesn't have any relevance, but this is the result of an unattended classical civilizations lesson and freely available board pens.
    also this is the first photo i have seen of the back of my head head....verrry weird

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    Forgot to post this, the second stage of my oil sp. I'll probably stop here as it's gone badly and the flaws are very obvious, but i hope that i learnt a lot from it and will have another go soon. i'd love some c&c

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    more heads from my head

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    You are applying oil-paint far too thinly, it looks like you are using it like watercolour washes.

    I disagree - to some extent - with the advice you were given by "Two Listen". In order to draw well from imagination, you need to have an imagination which is well-primed by observation. At this point, you have an ideal opportunity to increase your skill-set by observational drawing and painting.

    He found a formula for drawing comic rabbits;
    This formula for drawing comic rabbits paid,
    So in the end he could not change the tragic habits;
    this formula for drawing comic rabits made....
    ...By robert Graves

    Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by dcorc View Post
    I disagree - to some extent - with the advice you were given by "Two Listen". In order to draw well from imagination, you need to have an imagination which is well-primed by observation. At this point, you have an ideal opportunity to increase your skill-set by observational drawing and painting.
    I actually don't think we disagree at all. I merely emphasize that, in order to ensure you are actually learning from your studies, you have to be able to replicate them, utilize them. If you always need a reference, then are you really learning anything other than how to draw straight from reference?

    Just as you said - you must FUEL your imagination with studies, by learning, retaining the information, not limit yourself with them. And the only way to see whether or not you're retaining that information, is if you try to use it outside of the study.

    Drawing from imagination to see if you've learned from your studies is part of studying. It helps you discover what you're actually learning, and what you need to study more.

    Raffix: Your heads are actually turning out pretty cool. They're not necessarily realistic, but they've got a recognizable personality to them which is always a good thing. Keep developing that style of yours, it's nice to see.

    Last edited by Two Listen; December 12th, 2009 at 01:33 PM.
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    eurgh been ill lately so no posting for a while
    Thanks for the replies guys, i do love mixed messages lol just kidding
    well i was looking at my last post and i think that my style there was really forced and not really mine, hence why they looked a bit rubbish.
    *edit: these are from imagination btw*

    so i've been experimenting with trying to draw in a looser way, and even if the results aren't great (you probably won't be able to see what all these next things are ) it feels slightly more comfortable.

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    You've caught loads of character in those last heads.

    I sgree that the oils are laid on too thinly. Thin oils are more for an underpainting and sorting out the picture before committing yourself. Try doing one in blue or brown to get the drawing and values right, then you can slap the paint on with gusto.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    so this is more of me trying to draw from my head. i think i am getting slightly more confident and the results are improving.

    still just front views of heads, not confident enough to be more ambitious
    thank you for all replies!

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    That's fun. You've got the features in the right places - eyes are a bit big, but they are caricatures.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    i had a go at making a very short hand drawn animation. there's a glitch in the middle at some point but it was fun


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