Need Help! Line sensitivity/depth?
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Thread: Need Help! Line sensitivity/depth?

  1. #1
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    Need Help! Line sensitivity/depth?

    Hello guys, great to be here...

    Always when I am drawing I seem to have a certain problem - I don't know what the problem is exactly so maybe you guys can help me identify it?

    The picture drawn below, the one on the right is mines! (obviously!) I KNOW the proportions are wrong, but for this exercise this wasn't my concern.

    When I'm drawing on paper my drawings look very flat, there's no depth to my lines, as you can see on the left hand one there's a sense of depth and variation.





    How do I over come this? Is the way I'm holding my pencil? (charcoal pencil!) am I pushing do hard? I just don't get what I'm doing wrong, and this seems to be the problem in all my drawings, and this is what I want to achieve this sense of depth and sensitivity. If that makes sense...

    Even with digital sketching or painting, it's getting this mixture...else everything looks really flat!

    If I know what the problem is at least, then I could practice on it...

    Thank you.

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    two things:

    the artist on the left has a lot more control over his hand and his lines. See how precisely he set his lines, the neck for example is one, maximum two very concentrated direct lines. The shading under the chin is done with speed but also just with single lines, ending exactly at the right places.
    In the drawing on the right you set your lines randomly, going back and forth, going several times over one place or working very quick and careless (the lines under the chin, clothing). Don't make "fuzzy" lines but set precise, single lines (this works best if you have a soft sketch underneath it).
    The key for this one is discipline, experience and maybe routine. That means: Draw moar


    The second thing is: The artist who did the drawing on the left either had a model in front of him or used some kind of construction - both methods show the artist where the depth is and how the head looks in perspective, he understands what he is drawing and can adjust his strokes. It is more difficult for you to know where the lines go because you drew after a photo and because you didn't have a solid construction set up so you had to guess a lot of things.
    Try to read up Loomis "drawing the head and hands" http://www.scribd.com/doc/501782/And...Head-and-Hands (I'm sure you can download it somewhere too) to understand how you can do construction and how you can let things appear dimensional. Really read the book because Loomis says interesting things and reconstruct some of the heads.


    (and finally: even if the right one is distorted and a bit wonky I like it, very emotional :>)

    I just took a break to post this.
    But sometimes I also draw stuff
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    Critiqued!

    Hey.. first off good try on the drawing =]

    Crit:

    I think you drew the picture with the wrong "intent". Like.. you drew the picture while trying to copy the lines you saw..

    instead of seeing the actual human the lines made.. and trying to draw the human instead.. ( I hope this makes sense to you =] )


    For example.. look at his neck you drew a line that makes it appear as if a bone is sticking out ^_^. You did this in trying to draw the line you saw on the left image.. instead of just seeing the neck's general position and trying to draw that instead.. i Hope this helps! keep up the progress!! I'm new(first day) on this forums too go check out my forums and critique!!

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...07#post2257007

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    Wasp

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiera View Post
    two things:

    the artist on the left has a lot more control over his hand and his lines. See how precisely he set his lines, the neck for example is one, maximum two very concentrated direct lines. The shading under the chin is done with speed but also just with single lines, ending exactly at the right places.
    In the drawing on the right you set your lines randomly, going back and forth, going several times over one place or working very quick and careless (the lines under the chin, clothing). Don't make "fuzzy" lines but set precise, single lines (this works best if you have a soft sketch underneath it).
    The key for this one is discipline, experience and maybe routine. That means: Draw moar


    The second thing is: The artist who did the drawing on the left either had a model in front of him or used some kind of construction - both methods show the artist where the depth is and how the head looks in perspective, he understands what he is drawing and can adjust his strokes. It is more difficult for you to know where the lines go because you drew after a photo and because you didn't have a solid construction set up so you had to guess a lot of things.
    Try to read up Loomis "drawing the head and hands" http://www.scribd.com/doc/501782/And...Head-and-Hands (I'm sure you can download it somewhere too) to understand how you can do construction and how you can let things appear dimensional. Really read the book because Loomis says interesting things and reconstruct some of the heads.


    (and finally: even if the right one is distorted and a bit wonky I like it, very emotional :>)

    Thank you so much. I have downloaded all of Loomis's books, yesterday actually. Someone referred me to the exact same books!

    I'm drawing more everyday. You're right, I am going back and forth, instead of single lines, I did do a soft sketch underneath, which I thought looked good.

    But I still feel the problem hasn't been identified, I mean the eyes for example (I know the perspective is wrong) but why does eyes on the left look much more deeper, same with the mouth and nose - I always feel it's line sensitivity, maybe I'm pushing too hard or scribbling too much... But yes, I shall start reading Loomis's books and work through them.

    Like, I can get the perspective right, by drawing it - but making it look 3D or deeper, with just a few light/dark lines, I think that's amazing it feels every line I do has the same thickness - I have this problem in Photoshop too!

    Sorry if you've already answered my questions - I'm just angst-ing, thank you~!

    Quote Originally Posted by VideoJinx View Post
    Hey.. first off good try on the drawing =]

    Crit:

    I think you drew the picture with the wrong "intent". Like.. you drew the picture while trying to copy the lines you saw..

    instead of seeing the actual human the lines made.. and trying to draw the human instead.. ( I hope this makes sense to you =] )


    For example.. look at his neck you drew a line that makes it appear as if a bone is sticking out ^_^. You did this in trying to draw the line you saw on the left image.. instead of just seeing the neck's general position and trying to draw that instead.. i Hope this helps! keep up the progress!! I'm new(first day) on this forums too go check out my forums and critique!!

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...07#post2257007


    Yes, you're right! I wasn't bothered about getting the human correct, I wanted the lines and depth! I'd say I'm new but I've been lurking here for months...

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    Can I bump this up?

    Would like more input. Thank you~!

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    There's no easy quantitative answer to the question "how can I create the illusion of volume on a 2D surface?" Artists have been working on that problem for centuries.

    In the long run, my first-best advice is to enroll in an actual drawing class with an experienced teacher. There is so much important knowledge on this topic that just can't be expressed in text on an Internet forum. My second-best advice is to draw from life instead of copying other drawings or photos. When you're copying without some sense of how to express volume, you're just mimicking the flat shapes that are already there instead of seeing the volumes, and the end result is always going to feel flat.

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