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Thread: Animation Background

  1. #1
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    Animation Background

    Name:  sandbox_layout_colors_final.jpg
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    I finished this background for my short film "The Adventures of Zachary Bryant" which can be viewed on my blog at estudios-brian.blogspot.com

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    The perspective seems contradictory when you look at the sandbox vs the roots and the fence.

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    I know the perspective issue might be product of the toonish style, but if it is for an animation you have to make things understandable, I saw this sandbox and didn't know what it was until the egerie post, maybe I wasn't looking too carefully, but in animation, people don't, so what I would recommend is for you to show more sand, and respect only a little more the perspective of the fence, the other things look fine to me, colors, the tree design, and the background. Good work

    Alejandro Díaz
    Student
    Supinfocom Arles
    France

    http://adconcept.blogspot.com
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    It was actually forced that way on purpose. Perhaps I should have put the child in it for this post. Everything in the scene is designed to force your eye to the child in the sandbox in the actual film.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eStudios View Post
    Everything in the scene is designed to force your eye to the child in the sandbox in the actual film.

    What would help that immensely is if the fence followed the same perspective.

    Edit: Oops, didn't read all of adconcepts post

    If you wanted to go even further, why not drop the horizon down to one of the thirds and impart some design on your cartoon? The eye tends to find things on the thirds to be more interesting.

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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by adconcept View Post
    I know the perspective issue might be product of the toonish style, but if it is for an animation you have to make things understandable, I saw this sandbox and didn't know what it was until the egerie post, maybe I wasn't looking too carefully, but in animation, people don't, so (...)
    After rewriting a reply 3 times, I’not sure how to balance my response…

    Basically, this kind of arguments illustrates the clusterfuck and downfall of North American Saturday morning cartoons of the last 30 years (with a few exceptions). This mindset is like beginners crying it’s “their style”or “monsters don’t count” when called on anatomy basics. Composition and perspective can be cheated, but there’s always basic rules that you can’t break, kinda like comparative anatomy.
    Anyhow… if one would’ve said that in the animation studios I worked at, they’d be fired on the spot by the director. Drawing the eye to a character can, should, is done with composition (elements rhythm, overlay, underlay, BG construction, whatever) and perspective (fish eye, unfurled, cheated in any way). I understand that it can be complicated when you have a supervisor who doesn’t know shit about the basic rules though.

    Edit: Just to recap my 2 cents : It's not because we do "cartoon" that we should blindly cut corners. Cartoony doesn't needs to be pejorative or synonymous of poor quality anymore.

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