Where can i learn about values?
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    Where can i learn about values?

    Wherever i look - i cant seem to find a good tutorial about how to apply shadow&light values on your drawings(human figure,still objects etc.)

    Can anyone recommend me of anything good?

    Corel.

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    If this sort of question could be easily summed up into a tutorial why would anyone go to art school?

    Seriously, I'm not sure what you expect to hear. It's as "easy" as it seems it should be in many ways. Light comes from a direction, something gets in the way of it and casts a shadow. Really knowing how to apply that information though requires being able to think about your artwork (and draw it) in 3 dimensions. THAT takes a lot of practice, and drawing from life.

    Some things can't be easily put into a tutorial and summed up.

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    Well I honestly think the best way to learn this is by observation. Get a completely white object.. and egg is perfect. Put it in strong lighting.. and study it. Draw it from all angles. I think you will learn more about value from that than any book. Loomis' Successful Drawing has some info on it if you want to read that. The most important part of putting down values for me anyway is having dark darks and light lights. An important thing to remember is (this isnt a quote, but its how i remember it said) the darkest dark on the lit side of an object must always be lighter than the lightest light on the dark side of an object.. hope that makes sense

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    FourTonMantis is offline Without vision we will die Level 11 Gladiator: Essedarii
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    Cast a +2 contrast spell on your drawing.

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    Understanding Chiaroscuro

    You may find some of this free information helpful about shadow and light. Now that you've been enlightened, you'll need to hone you're observation skills.

    Recommended read:

    Drawing Light and Shade: Understanding Chiaroscuro (The Art of Drawing)

    by Giovanni Civardi


    Ask Maurice.Org


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    Quote Originally Posted by FourTonMantis View Post
    Cast a +2 contrast spell on your drawing.
    *chuckle*

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    Ilaekae is offline P.O.W.! Leader, Complete Idiot, Super Moderator Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    "Where can i learn about values?"

    I learned across my mother's knees with my pants yanked down. Don't recommend it for others...

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilaekae View Post
    "Where can i learn about values?"

    I learned across my mother's knees with my pants yanked down. Don't recommend it for others...
    HAHA - didnt see it coming

    Anyways - thanks for the advices!(i'll try that egg-advice - seems really helping)
    I also came across this tutorial which explains a lot of things..

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruuhkis View Post
    J Wilson, you'd probably think otherwise if you saw Scott Robertson's tutorials I highly recommend these..:

    http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/sto...tte-Surfaces-1
    http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/sto...tte-Surfaces-2
    http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/sto...tte-Surfaces-3
    I'm aware the topic can easily be expanded to more advanced thought, although it still boils down to "Light comes from a direction, something gets in the way of it and casts a shadow." Even reflected light and ambient light etc still boils down to light coming from a direction (or from many directions). Still not exactly the heavy sort of stuff you want to throw at a beginner.

    While the original poster is asking about shading, I suspect the real problem is drawing in 3d space, creating volume. Shading/creating value is going to be tough without that knowledge first, and almost falls into place (or at least is much easier to understand and tackle) once you understand forms.

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    In any case, Robertson is a great teacher and knows how to simplify this, so that even the beginner can understand some of the logic of light and shade. He also goes through some principles of creating 3d objects (volume), I'm not just too sure whether those lessons are in these DVDs or in some others at Gnomo n.

    hmm..I'm off to write Santa a letter =)

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    Quote Originally Posted by J Wilson View Post
    Still not exactly the heavy sort of stuff you want to throw at a beginner.
    Well - actually i read a little bit about ambient light and speculars on the link i have posted at my previous message - i think i understand it..
    Because i'm a beginner i know that i have TONS of info to read and learn so i figured out to try and learn as many subjects as i can simultaneously.
    Like - i learn about the human figure now but side by side i thought i need to start and learn about coloring,values etc in digital painting(and i also have machinery,animal and environment drawing ahead of me... :-/ )

    Quote Originally Posted by J Wilson View Post
    While the original poster is asking about shading, I suspect the real problem is drawing in 3d space, creating volume. Shading/creating value is going to be tough without that knowledge first, and almost falls into place (or at least is much easier to understand and tackle) once you understand forms.
    So why didn't you say it to me earlier? where can i read about that stuff(although i think i can understand forms in 3d - but some info will always be welcomed..)

    Corel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruuhkis View Post
    In any case, Robertson is a great teacher and knows how to simplify this, so that even the beginner can understand some of the logic of light and shade. He also goes through some principles of creating 3d objects (volume), I'm not just too sure whether those lessons are in these DVDs or in some others at Gnomo n.

    hmm..I'm off to write Santa a letter =)
    Do yourself a favor and get this Scott Robertson's series. They are amazing and helped me a lot.

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    Do yourself a favor and get this Scott Robertson's series. They are amazing and helped me a lot.

    I don't know I quoted ruuhkis and got a double post... I'm such a forum n00b.

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    Spray paint everything in your house white and use your ceiling lights as your light source. Then get a pencil and some paper and I think you will be good to go.

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    Hey Corel,

    If you are talking about tonal values as opposed to colour, a good exercise is to take some colour images you really like and look at how they work in monohrome. It's often quite revealing and you get some unexpected results sometimes. I do it from time to time when I need to check out how the values are working.
    I use the channel mixer in Photoshop (7 in my case) set to monochrome to do it.

    There is an old Norman Rockwell ( died 1978 ) instructional book called -
    'How I Make a Picture' ISBN 0-8230-2384-2
    He really is old school, but with more modern twists in the later part of his 60 year + career. He states that you can paint a picture in any colours and it WILL work if you get the tonal values right - then the talented swine goes on to prove it in a series of colour studies of the same scene, each carrying a different colour cast.

    It's a bit pricey on Amazon UK (one at 145 !!!??!!), but still about apparently. Worth a look if you get the chance. I'm locking mine away in a vault now I've seen that price tag.

    A lot of good links posted here. Hope you find all you need.

    Nick

    Last edited by Nickillus; May 1st, 2009 at 05:03 AM. Reason: typo's
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    I think drawing from life and analyzing what you're seeing is best practice.
    A friend of mine did a number of demonstrations that you might find helpful:

    http://tsofa.com/viewtopic.php?p=9845&highlight=#9845
    http://tsofa.com/viewtopic.php?p=12842&highlight=#12842
    http://tsofa.com/viewtopic.php?p=12956&highlight=#12956
    http://tsofa.com/viewtopic.php?p=10220&highlight=#10220

    Also, there's some good ideas in Harold Speed's book which you can get from Project Gutenberg online library.

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