Wide Gamut Monitors
 
View testimonialsView Artwork
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Wide Gamut Monitors

    I could use some qualified opinions here.
    For illustration and design work that gets printed, what is your take on wide gamut monitors?
    I'm having a hard time coming to conclusions on whether buying a wide gamut monitor instead of an sRGB monitor with a high quality panel would be worth the extra hassle. While it seems somewhat negligent of people working towards printed end-products, it almost seems to be the norm to stay within the realms or sRGB in terms of hardware. Any thoughts?



    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Russia, Moscow
    Posts
    261
    Thanks
    94
    Thanked 34 Times in 28 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    if you're working directly only for critical print output, the wide gamut monitor is right for you. but one thing to consider is that on wide gamut monitors sRGB emulation is very poor comparable with pro sRGB monitors. and i think you already know that images on WG monitors are very saturated in red and green. so sRGB monitors in that case more natural looking.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    2,083
    Thanks
    323
    Thanked 970 Times in 520 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I would assume (maybe incorrectly) that most monitors already have a wider gamut than print CMYK. Even if you want work that will look great on other people's screens, if your gamut is wider than theirs aren't you including more information than most people will be able to see? It might be great if you can create beautiful and subtle effects happening in the shadows, but if no one can see them...

    I'm sure there's a place for those kinds of displays, but for work destined for print it might be overkill.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for your replies. I don't exclusively work for critical print output. However, I want the monitor to be both future proof and up to illustration industry standards, so to speak. So my biggest inquiry here is, are there any such standards? For example, do some clients demand images to be delivered in AdobeRGB?

    I'm aware wide gamut monitors can display wrong colors in a non-color-managed application/OS, but there seem to be some work-arounds at least for web browsing and movie playback. Of course, I would like to avoid this problem altogether... that's why I'm asking here. sRGB seems to be sufficient professionally and beneficial privately, but I want to make sure.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    192
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 94 Times in 38 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I know that some sources recommend Adobe RGB or other wide gamut spaces for print - but really this makes very little sense in practical terms.

    sRGB is already much wider as a colour space than CMYK, and using an even wider gamut space such as Adobe RGB just makes conversions even harder, especially for illustration where you are creating colours from scratch (as opposed to capturing them from nature in photographs).

    Using wide-gamut spaces for print has one very small advantage: namely it possible to get a little purer yellows and cyans (which are two colours in the CMYK gamut which are more saturated than in most RGB models), but every other colour becomes harder to convert. In fact in the majority of cases it's much better to work in the narrower gamut of sRGB which will lead to far fewer conversion problems.

    Aside from all that, at the moment wide-gamut monitors are a pain to use (on Windows anyway, can't speak for the Mac) because they won't display the desktop, web or any other non-colour managed space correctly, and this is extremely frustrating in everyday use.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to frog from itchy For This Useful Post:


  8. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for clarifying. Now, if only decent sRGB monitors were more common these days! It seems almost all non-TN-panel monitors being released are wide gamut. Makes you wonder.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook