Art: Difficulty in making my faces/figures look solid.

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  1. #1
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    Difficulty in making my faces/figures look solid.

    I seem to have problems making my faces look solid. Something always apears off about them and I was wondering if anyone could give me any tips for better construction. Some 'easier' method. I am familiar with the entire 'eyes fall halfway, nose is halfway between eyes and chin" etc. Although I find it difficult to use. It hasn't really benefited me so in a way I've give up on it.

    Save me:
    http://i40.tinypic.com/1zeh093.jpg
    http://i42.tinypic.com/10eh83c.jpg
    http://i42.tinypic.com/2ugh0me.jpg
    http://i42.tinypic.com/iegl74.jpg

    I really apprechiate any suggestions or crits.
    Thank you.

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  3. #2
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    The heads themselves look good to me, on the first and third picture especially. On both full figures, the head is way too small though. I wonder if you're focusing on it as a separate thing and ignoring the rest of the body when you render the face. Try to keep it just as simplified as the body at the start, Loomis has a good way to draw the basic shape if you haven't yet stumbled on it.

    I think you're well on your way though.The clear forms on the first and third sheet show you have a good grip of handling constructions. Just keep drawing those studies.

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  4. #3
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    one of my instructors believes that the very core foundation of drawing is form and it can be best learned through sculpting in clay. all he would tell you is to sculpt your problems away.

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  5. #4
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    Honestly, I expected much worse when I clicked on the links, but from what I can tell, you're doing great. For a more solid feeling, what you need to do is focus on volume and form. Aaron touched on this, and actual sculpting is of course one way to start thinking in 3 dimensions, however, many people don't do this (I didn't).

    You need to visualize the head in its basic forms and components, the shape and planes of a projecting nose for instance. A good time to remember this when drawing is when you're shading. Never just shade out from an outline if you're not sure it would actually look like that. Identify plane changes, and focus on those areas. Shadows only form where light can't reach, so think about the volume and form and construction of the head logically in conjunction with the direction the light is coming from and things like that. I would recommend some good books on this, but I can't think of any right off hand. Try the free art E-books thread.

    Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smuli View Post
    The heads themselves look good to me, on the first and third picture especially. On both full figures, the head is way too small though. I wonder if you're focusing on it as a separate thing and ignoring the rest of the body when you render the face. Try to keep it just as simplified as the body at the start, Loomis has a good way to draw the basic shape if you haven't yet stumbled on it.

    I think you're well on your way though.The clear forms on the first and third sheet show you have a good grip of handling constructions. Just keep drawing those studies.
    Ahh, you're definatly right about it being too small. I wonder why I never noticed that? Or my instructor for that matter? I used to have troubles with drawing the head too large so it's reasonable to assume that I've been overcompensating. But I'll definatly keep that in mind. I am really trying hard to improve my anatomy work over the course of the upcoming summer before I go to college in the fall. I feel behind.

    I'll check that out, thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by aaronmiller View Post
    one of my instructors believes that the very core foundation of drawing is form and it can be best learned through sculpting in clay. all he would tell you is to sculpt your problems away.
    Quote Originally Posted by drd View Post
    Honestly, I expected much worse when I clicked on the links, but from what I can tell, you're doing great. For a more solid feeling, what you need to do is focus on volume and form. Aaron touched on this, and actual sculpting is of course one way to start thinking in 3 dimensions, however, many people don't do this (I didn't).

    You need to visualize the head in its basic forms and components, the shape and planes of a projecting nose for instance. A good time to remember this when drawing is when you're shading. Never just shade out from an outline if you're not sure it would actually look like that. Identify plane changes, and focus on those areas. Shadows only form where light can't reach, so think about the volume and form and construction of the head logically in conjunction with the direction the light is coming from and things like that. I would recommend some good books on this, but I can't think of any right off hand. Try the free art E-books thread.

    Good luck.
    I get so frustrated with it because in my mind I can see how the forms should look and connect and drawing them on paper, ugh. Actually earlier today my brother and I went to the store and he bought some cheap modeling clay that I was messing around with and it did seem to help me. Maybe not help me so much as I was just rather impressed that my drawing skills seemed to transfer rather well to sculpture.

    Thanks for your suggestions. I'll test them out latter tonight and post some new drawings. See if I show any very minor improvements. Woahh--E-book thread?! I am definatly look at that.

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    if you keep doing it you should then notice how your sculpting transfers to drawing. don't focus on making perfect copies of stuff. just get the feel of the solidity of the form. you want to draw the front of someones face and feel all the way to the back of the head. i'm still working on it myself.

    i work with sculpting bones. i take the clay and make tiny little balls and then built my model piece by piece. my future challenge is to sculpt some of these bones hollow. its all brain training that translates to draftsmanship. make form your supreme goal and the rest should follow.

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  8. #7
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    You're doing fine. Keep it up. Be patient.


    Tristan Elwell
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  9. #8
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    I agree with others that you might be being too hard on yourself too early.

    That being said, it looks to me like you are mainly focusing on contour and then adding shading without understanding why it's light here or dark there. Learn how to build forms with tones.

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