Caravaggio influenced Self Portrait

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  1. #1
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    Caravaggio influenced Self Portrait

    For my class we had to take a work of art from history that emphasized
    the hands, torso, and head. I chose Caravaggio's St Jerome. This is a work in progress and would like some feedback on how it looks so far

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    Dude, nice start. I'm likeing the folds in the robe. Don't want to crit too much until it's finished. Please post updates. The inner ear is too bright for me. Distracting? Maybe not fair crit until you're done. Good luck, and good start!

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    the forearm and wrist seem a little too thick

    im trying.
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    ...

    a little bit more done
    tried to thin the arm and wrist a little

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    Nice to see some Caravaggio love! Some anatomical problems aside, I think you're hurting this a lot by making the shadows with pure black. Pay very close attention to the colors in the original painting, and try to recreate that in yours (or, if you're going for a slightly different look, pick colors that are consistent with your lighting). Just adding black or gray makes skin look dead. Otherwise, seems to be a nice start, I'll be watching for updates.

    -Sid

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  9. #6
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    great start! I actually like the pure black in this case, I believe C did a lot of drama black shadows... a lot of the old masters did, this adds to the piece and you look good in this setting, finish this piece, can't wait for the fixes...

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    pretty much done

    I'm having trouble deciding whether the eyes should be opened more or stay closed.

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    I want to echo what Sidharth said about using black and grey. While it is true that Caravaggio had some very dramatic lighting, and very deep darks, this effect is created by the layering of a lot of dark colours, slowly. It looks to me as if you are using the burn and dodge tools (or their analogs in your painting program) to create highlight and shadow instead of layering colour. Browns and reds primarily are layered together to get the shadows in Caravaggio's work. (see this work for example: http://www.csvfblog.org/wp-content/u...avaggio_01.jpg Note how the apostle in back's hair isn't a perfect black, but instead has slight reddish highlights and deep brown shadows.) Trying to blend the black in is creating muddy colours instead of rich ones. (I'd try working light to dark, building very slowly.) Your back wall seems to have more of the layered browns and reds going on, but the human's shadows blend murkily.

    You do seem to have a good grasp of Caravaggio's sense for how the dark builds the shapes, but the edges where stuff merges is where things get muddy.

    she sings from somewhere you can't see ...

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