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Thread: Three-point perspective question

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    Three-point perspective question

    How does one measure off rows of windows on a building or skyscraper in three-point perspective? It's easy enough using vertical and horizontal scales of equal distance to measure in one and two-point, but that method doesn't seem to work for three-point. All the perspective books I own somehow avoid the issue of measuring in three-point perspective.

    I asked this question in another forum and was told to "eye-ball" it, but I would rather prefer to do it the correct way. So, how's it done?
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    hi balooga,
    if you mean you want to draw exactly windows with measurement 0.8*1.2m like 200 times on a scyscraper in a three-point perspective: i say this is not possible like in a two-point perspective.

    instead of measure the window, you could construct it.
    (check out the attatchement)
    draw the hole bilding. say, its about 100meters high. you want to draw 50 rows of windows.
    to get the middle line of the building, draw on each surface (the irregular quadrilateral) both diagonal lines. connect the cross point with a vanishing point, this cuts the area into two identical parts, each 50meters high (red lines on the left).
    proceed with these parts, draw diagonal lines again and cut the surface again in two parts (red lines on the right)... till you got your 50 rows, each row is now exactly 2meters high.

    oh shit. i hope you understand, geometrical instruction in a different language...

    regards,
    orwell
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    In photoshop you can use this shortcut. remember_orwell, I hope you don't mind that I used your picture.
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    h2rra, i dont mind
    but i think Balooga wants to draw by hand...?
    besides, good trick to doing that by computer.
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    Remember Orwell, thank you for the diagram. That helps a lot.

    h2rra, that's a neat Photoshop trick. It's a cheat, but quick and easy to do -- thanks!
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    If you want to do it manually you can wait for Dobsky's dvd or chew through this text. For me that link is way too complicated...
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    Quote Originally Posted by h2rra View Post
    If you want to do it manually you can wait for Dobsky's dvd or chew through this text. For me that link is way too complicated...
    You ain't kidding! Yikes, that actually made my head hurt!

    Who is Dobsky, and when/where will his dvd be avaiable?
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    Carl Dobsky is a dude in Massive Black. His paintings are insanely awesome. Click http://media.massiveblack.com/ to find dvds.

    h2rra: good link. Kinda complicated though. Working through it now.
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    3-pointer question

    Sorry for reviving this old thread, but I don't wanna clutter the forum by starting another new thread.

    This post is also about 3-point perspective, but of a slightly different nature.

    Pls find below a quick sketch of a typical 3-point setup of a skyscraper.
    The eye level is the horizontal line at the bottom and the sets of vanishing points are indicated by the "Xs":

    Three-point perspective question

    Now, I add another building to the left of this building:

    Three-point perspective question

    Now, you see the problem: the new building (B) LOOKS DISTORTED!

    I thought I understand 3-point perspective pretty well until a friend asked me this question the other day regarding his work, and I was totally thrown off and puzzled myself!

    In 1 point perspective, there can only be 1 vanishing point, right?

    In 2 point, there can be many sets of vanishing points (I'm 100% confident about this) on the same eye level.

    In 3 point perspective, there can be many sets of vanishing points on the same eye level (just like 2 point), but what about that vanishing point at the top ("Zenith")? Can there be multiple vanishing points at the top for 3-point perspective?

    Thanks!
    Xeon
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    If you have distortion, you are drawing outside of the eye's 60 degree cone of vision as represented on your drawing.

    The answer to your question tracks that of the OP in that to avoid the distortion you have to accurately plot your 90 and 60 degree "cones" (represented by circles). And, using this perspective layout, you need to be able to create "measuring points" to allow you to scale/measure exactly how big your windows are (if you want to avoid just doing divisions with diagonals or eyeballing a window and using similar tricks that don't involve using measuring points.

    Measuring points are easy enough to construct in 2 Point. I'm not sure of a source that shows how to construct them in 3 Point. [And, most texts do fluff off any real deep practical instruction on 3 point.]

    I'll see if I can find something. But, me? I've never made it all the way through the "Handprint" discussion either! It's pretty dense!
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    Quote Originally Posted by h2rra View Post
    If you want to do it manually you can wait for Dobsky's dvd or chew through this text. For me that link is way too complicated...
    You may want to try John Raynes' 'The complete guide to perspective', which gives a more accessible presentation of measure points.
    Last edited by eezacque; September 2nd, 2010 at 11:11 PM. Reason: Oops, didn't notice this thread is really old...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    In 3 point perspective, there can be many sets of vanishing points on the same eye level (just like 2 point), but what about that vanishing point at the top ("Zenith")? Can there be multiple vanishing points at the top for 3-point perspective?
    There is one vanishing point for every direction: this principle is the same in 1, 2 and 3 point perspective. So, to answer your last question: no, there is exactly one vanishing point for the vertical.

    However, this does not mean you can freely choose your vanishing points somewhere on the horizon line: vanishing points need to be constructed, and generally, the vanishing points in 2 and 3 point perspective correspond to directions that make right angles.

    Assuming that your sky scrapers are blocks, with all corners having perfectly right angles, the vanishing points of sky scraper B must be either on the left or on the right of the corresponding vanishing points of A, because the orientation of B is rotated with respect to A. For your B, the vanishing points are 'outside' the vanishing points of A, which means that its corners are not right.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    Sorry for reviving this old thread, but I don't wanna clutter the forum by starting another new thread.

    This post is also about 3-point perspective, but of a slightly different nature.

    Pls find below a quick sketch of a typical 3-point setup of a skyscraper.
    The eye level is the horizontal line at the bottom and the sets of vanishing points are indicated by the "Xs":

    Three-point perspective question

    Now, I add another building to the left of this building:

    Three-point perspective question

    Now, you see the problem: the new building (B) LOOKS DISTORTED!

    Xeon
    Parallel lines have the same vanishing point.

    In a normal city block, buildings are lined up so that they are square to one another, meaning that various lines for two buildings would have the same vanishing point. Your buildings likely look somewhat distorted because you have given them different vanishing points, thereby implying that their walls/roofs are not parallel to one another.

    I suspect that the vertical axis might also have different vanishing points, but you could only really test this by finding/making a bunch of regular shapes which are not parallel vertically. So... not buildings, since those kinda tend to have vertical walls.
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