Sketchbook: Whitaker: sketchbook and Reverie workshop - Page 6
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  1. #151
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    Dear William,

    I must say looking at your work and reading about your knowledge and expertise makes me shed a tear. Not because of the fact that I'm jealous or anything like it, no, I can't tell you how grateful I am of you sharing your knowledge to anyone who is willing to learn. I admire how humble you are and know that art itself is a process and you never stop learning. It really inspired me to get further and get better. I want to take this opportunity to ask you something myself.

    I love to see other artists work and to see their work. I always think and hope that I'll be able to reach their level of expertise somehow. But that goal lies to far in the future for me to keep me exited. I also get stuck the moment I pick up my pencil and want to draw. If I make studies, the studies look like cr**. I tend to quit drawing the moment I feel awkward about what I'm drawing in that moment. It results into not drawing at all because I'm not confident of my skills at all... My question to you is: Did you ever experienced something similar like this and how did you break out of it. Or can you please give me some direction how I should break out of it? I'm only 19 years old right now and I know that I'll get better as I grow older and wiser. But right now I'm stuck in a bad cycle of denying that I can draw and therefore not drawing at all...

    Anyway, thanks for putting some of your amazing art in your sketchbook and sharing your knowledge with all of us.

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  2. #152
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    Hi William, could i ask you an oil painting question?

    Im currently using a limited palette of Titanium white, Red Vermillion, Yellow Orche, Ivory black. For the skin tone, i usually mix white, vermillion and yellow orche for the base which looks quite skin tone like for me. But for the shadow area, i just couldn't get it to look skin tone like. I mix white, black and some mixture of the base skin tone, it became very greyish or is shadow area supposed to be greyish with this limited palette? Is there a nice formula for mixing skin tones or its all about experiment Or should i start with even lesser colors like what Aaron Coberly did http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...hlight=limited


    Thank you very much!

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  3. #153
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    beautiful new pieces! I love that last portrait so much it's not even funny.thanks for the process shots

    -----------------------
    Available for freelance work! contact me via : cgrobelski@gmail.com

    PORTFOLIO

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    Follow me on Twitter!!

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    friend me on Facebook!!!!

    .....bitches!

    Finally Finished

    Da sketchbook
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  4. #154
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    Thanks so much for sharing all these phenomenal pieces of art!!! There is no greater form of inspiration really than to see a master at work...

    "How satisfying it is to leave a mark on a blank surface. To make a map of my movement -- no matter how temporary." -Blankets, Craig Thompson
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  5. #155
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  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by William Whitaker View Post
    ThabisoMhlaba and grenappels: good, bad, or indifferent, you only keep yourself going if you really love doing it. I've done a tremendous amount of work, most of it indifferent or bad. Fortunately, I've hit a few good notes too. I'd love to go out and gather up a lot of my work and burn it though.

    This business is a mix of talents. You will be strong in some areas and weak in others. The weak areas will eventually draw you to them and someday they will be your strengths. Initially, I couldn't draw or paint white drapery, bare backs, or the bottoms of feet. When I learned to do these things well, I really felt a sense of accomplishment.

    Our brand of art is indeed a lonely thing. Too much solitude is torture. That is why a forum like this is such a blessing. You should find like-minded spirits here. I'm fortunate to have a few young apprentices like Emily G who keep me company. I think they do me more good than I do them.

    The thing to do is to help others. Reach out and be a friend to someone. There have to be young artists where you live who would benefit from your friendship. Find 'em!
    Thanks a lot I'll definitely be on the look out for more people with similiar interests. Its just getting tough doing things conceptart related with no one really around doing the same but doing the summer I can do some Internships hopefully.

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  7. #157
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    Thank you everybody. This is often a solitary business and the encouraging comments you post are a great kindness. I appreciate it. I'm sure others do too.

    I'd post more, but I've had a long day at the easel.

    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com
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  8. #158
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    Before I go to bed, I'd like to answer Krytos' oil painting question. I hope this might be useful for some others too.

    Your basic four colors comprise the so-called classic palette. To be 100% sure of the following information, I'd have to see your red-vermillion. However, if your paints are quality, I'm sure your red-vermillion is just fine too.

    Mix some secondary colors.
    Black plus yellow ochre = green.
    Black plus white = blue.
    Both those secondaries are good to modify and tone down your basic flesh of white, vermillion and yellow ochre. When mixing your basic flesh, start with white, add just enough yellow ochre to get the right pitch, then add a tiny bit of vermillion to get it just right. Add more vermillion and you get pink cheeks and even lips.

    Now mix black and vermillion. You get a lovely dark brown. Use this unmodified for your darkest shadows in the nose, ears, and lip line. Apply it thin and transparent for your darkest flesh.

    A useful color for turning your form from the light flesh to the shadow is raw umber. You can make a good raw umber by mixing black, yellow and a little red. Add white to it and it approaches grey.

    Play around.

    But remember, the best way to learn is to paint from life. Con a friend into sitting for you. I've done that for years, then given the sitter the results. If you are smarter than I am, you can sell the sitter the results!

    Work in natural indirect light. Place your figure against a dark neutral background. (A piece of cloth will do.) This will give you Old Master light and shadows, which are the best for painting the figure.

    I've posted a head I cropped from a fairly recent 10x8" painting on panel. (A lot of my current stuff is small.) I did this with a fairly limited palette. Remember, value is more important than color.

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    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com
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  10. #159
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    It was such a pleasure to be able to meet with you at the Dallas workshop. Thank you for your advice. Your statement about copying is very important. I am part of that "Must be original" mindset. You are helping me break out of that and just focus on being good. Also thanks for the painting tips in the last post, I have been itching for that advice for a while.

    For Science- Sketchbook!
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  11. #160
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    What a Fantastic post ,informative and inspirational. Many thanks Mr. Whitaker.

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  12. #161
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    Thank you Mr William Really grateful for passing down your knowledge

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  13. #162
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    Thank you sir again for sharing your knowledge, I'm very interested in your "painting from life" advise, I was doing some sketches and trying to work fast with a few medium in a "solid" way, but I noticed than my paint broke very fast, I saw your sketches with solid paint, how do you keep your solid paint with those nice brush strokes without break?
    What I'm doing wrong?

    Daniel Bejarano Casarino
    www.bejaranocasarino.com
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  14. #163
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    Wow,
    I went back to school late in life and unfortunately I didn't take full advantage of it due to life responsibilities and just plain old stupidity. I find myself trying to play catch up now more then ever. I know art is always going to be a learning experience and due to your words I am learning a great deal and thank you for them, along with your wonderful ability. Thanks you for sharing it is really amazing. I wish I would have listened more before.

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  15. #164
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    alesoun, oh the lauguage barrier! I suspect greaseproof paper is simply a more elegant way of saying tracing paper. I'm not entirely sure however. The tracing paper I use won't allow oil paint to bleed through, so I believe that would pass as "greaseproof."

    Mydrako, copying is a good way to learn. Copy what most interests you and follow your feelings. You will thereby master one thing after another very naturally. Mastering art is so difficult that we really have to indulge ourselves. If it isn't fun, we will not do it. Gittins was originally from England. He was a brilliant portraitist and draftsman. He kept sound craftsmanship alive after it was finally and completely pronounced dead in 1950. Nobody in the 1950's could imagine you guys in 2009! Nobody!
    Gittins died at fifty-nine - smoked himself to death.

    maldrin, this particular drawing was done from a rather inferior photo. However, I've certainly done this from life. It's very useful because it's fast. I currently have Emily G and another apprentice drawing each other using this technique.

    Lostlimeturtle, I sympathize with you. It seems like only yesterday I was nineteen. I was the only person on the entire planet who thought I had any talent - and I was delusional! All I can say is that you will continue if you are driven to it. If your life leads you in another direction, be thankful for that too. So many of you here remind me of me (or a past version of me). When I was a teen, I did hundreds and hundreds of crazy drawings - just like many of you. It added up after a lot of effort. Remember too that an experienced professional will never sneer at your efforts. No matter how bad your drawings are, mine have been worse! This isn't a horse race. It's more a crazy compulsion.

    Gloominati, crown, destinyapocalypse,
    have I ever told you that you are some of my favorite people? How I like to read nice things! Thank you.

    ForScience, originality is fine, but master your skills and tools. When you are in charge, your built-in originality will get you somewhere. Schools that promote self-expression and originality and forget skill turn out lots of graduates that go nowhere in the visual world. Never feel guilty about copying. You will learn faster and grow farther that way.

    Victor B, I will have to quote you! Thank you for the nice words.

    bejaranocasarino,
    I would have to see you work to know exactly what your problem is, but I suspect you need to paint with a light touch. I heavy brush stroke will simply dig a hole in your wet paint. A light stroke will leave a wet layer over a wet layer. It is hard to do well, but try it. You might find some answers in my post here: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=83405

    IronFistGoon, just take heart that art is still an old man's business. We only go one direction in life. As long as you can strap a brush on your wrist, you can paint.

    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com
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  17. #165
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    o my that last piece is truly inspiring time to get out the oils.
    Ill be back when iv messed to much stuff up...umm u might just wana wait here

    And another o my im gonna need to copy down all the info your giving you
    are a truly wise person.

    ~You should never doubt what nobody is sure about~


    Demo's Digital Damsels

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  18. #166
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    Thank you for sharing. This is the first time I have been to your thread and I find it very inspiring. A lot of great advice. When I started drawing/painting, I always copied things I loved or work I respected. I still have a LONG way to go, especially with my figure drawing and anatomy. Time to start a sketchbook I think!
    Since I don't have a sketchbook I can't expect any comments or advice from you there but I do have my website link in my signature if you are interested in looking. I would appreciate some advice from someone as knowledgeable as yourself. Thanks again!

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  19. #167
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    Your recent updates are truly inspiring and beautiful. Your words of experience and wisdom help keep me keep pushing forward. Thanks for the kind words regarding my sketchbook in an earlier post. I took your advise and started making and "exact copy". I'm still working on it but, would love some feed back from you, if you have the time.
    Thank you for sharing you work, knowledge and passion for art.

    My Sketchbook
    My Website: jamminart.com/
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  20. #168
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    Hello there Mr Whitaker,

    I'm sorry not to have commented properly before, but my great respect for you and your art left me unsure of what to say, but after so much informative posts and advice I had to thank you.

    So, thank you.

    Thanks your comments on copying for starts. I've been struggling with that to focus on with my drawing, some say original stuff others still life's and studies, so I was more than happy to see that its was more than "Ok" to copy.
    And so like many others after reading though this thread, I've started on some exact copies.

    And thanks again for your advice on painting. I've only just started with oils and you've helped them make a lot more sense.

    And one last thank you for posting your art. Your pencil renderings are bind-blowing, such detail and form, and the paintings are some of the best I've seen. The one further up the page is just beautiful, as is the way you paint/draw cloth.

    I am so very jealous of Emily and others who have studied with you, and I'm so grateful that you continue to share your knowledge and inspirational passion.

    Every bit of help is appreciated,
    Matt.

    Quote Originally Posted by gutss View Post
    yesterday, God came to me in a dream and told me that if I don't become a comic book artist, he has decreed that I shall instead be a burlesque dancer.
    And I said, "But God, nice panties are so expensive!"
    And he said, "Welp, I suppose you better shut up and draw."


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  21. #169
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    HOLY SMOKES!! IVE FOUND A NEW MASTER TO LOOK UP TO. my confidence is boosted. im definately subscribing to this thread. BY the way GORGEOUS DRAWINGS.



    "EVERY GOOD PAINTER PAINTS WHAT HE IS" Jackson Pollock

    "I am obsessed with the process of creation" Zdzislaw Beksinski
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  22. #170
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    Hello Sir ... Undoubtedly 3 ladies on the top n the man with hat accompying them are outstanding... I love reach this level some.. So delicate n so beautiful ladies have come out.. Hats off to you sir...

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  23. #171
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    Simply beautiful.. Out of wrods.. This girl speaks a lot... God bless you sir.

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  24. #172
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    What a great demonstration William! I found it very useful thanks for the link, you're right about the light strokes, I will try it.
    My paint also breaks when it dries but only in the places that I've been working with solid brush strokes, could that be for the lack of medium? I'm really worried about it as you can see.
    This thread is a blessing, and your art always amazing!

    Daniel Bejarano Casarino
    www.bejaranocasarino.com
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  25. #173
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    Thank you once again for your inspiring words. I am very aware of the fact that my life could go another way then art. Even if I can't imagine it right now because art means a lot more to me nowadays than anything else did ever. I think I just have to keep on going. I thankfully made promise to myself to draw everyday for at least an hour and doing so will get my fire burning again. And I can feel an ember growing inside of me. I think that's a good sign.

    In the meanwhile I'm gonna keep going and keep myself entertained with the amazing art and beauty the world has to offer. Thanks again.

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  26. #174
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    All I can is wow. Really solid drawings, great structure. Everything is physically there, weighted, textured and rendered correctly. Amazing drapery. This is something that I need to work a lot more on.

    You've probably been asked this a billion times before, but I was wondering if you could tell me if you use a medium with oils. I'm working on a Leyendecker copy right now and I really want to achieve the same kind of shine that he achieved with his paint.

    Also, I was wondering what colors you use for an underpainting. In high school I studied a method of building a painting in successive layers from the midtones out to the extreme lights and darks, building from thin to thick as we went. We started with yellow ochre than sienna's, than umber's. It seemed to work at the time. What do you think of this approach?

    Thanks for having the patience to put up with all the questions from us kids, this is really a great thing going here.

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  27. #175
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    Keith, you may want to check out this link It will give you a start on how Mr. Whitaker does his paintings. My favourite painting of all is "The Secret."

    Cheers,
    Rick.

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  28. #176
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    If I had a chance, I would become your full-time pupil, Sir Whitaker.

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  29. #177
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    Bone Toss

    Always impressive

    What do you think of
    the Rublev oils/mediums?


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  30. #178
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    Itís about time I checked the forum. You are all writing such nice things.
    First off, Demo, JailHouseRock2, IOstinthOughts, Anup1, Lostlimeturtle, Chupacabra, a heartfelt thanks. Let us all take this art thing just a day at a time.

    Zimfin, Iíd love to check out your website. I will do so and comment. Remember, I love to harp and criticize, to tear others down to make myself feel better. I am perpetually narrow minded and small minded. Just ask Emily!

    Bejaranocasarino, Iím not sure why you are having trouble. It might be you need to add oil.

    Keith, Iíve painted about every way there is to paint over the years as Iíve sought to do it better. Currently all Iím using is linseed oil Ė nothing fancier than that. The paintings take a little longer to dry, but I usually work on several at a time. After a coat of paint dries on my canvas, it usually goes very dull Ė especially the dark colors. I simply rub on a little linseed oil with my finger and paint into that. After a painting is finished and dry, I give it a coat of final varnish. That makes it nice and shiny.

    Mentler, I really love Rublev Oleogel. Itís nothing but linseed oil with silicate added to it. Iím not even using that very much, mostly simple linseed oil right now Ė but then Iím currently working pretty small scale.

    William Whitaker
    www.williamwhitaker.com
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  31. #179
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    thank you for posting such wonders and masterpieces, these pages are filled with inspiration.

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  32. #180
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    Mentler, here is a photo of the Oleogel. I fill an old plastic film can with the stuff for short term use, then put the lid on the original can real tight to keep it from gradually oxidizing.

    Iíll usually oil out the dried surface of my painting before I start painting on it again. Sometimes I do this with my fingers, sometimes with a brush. I want to end up with a very light film, like a well oiled rifle Ė very little oil.

    The brush glides on a lightly oiled surface. Too much oil and it slides.

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