The Artist's Reading List - Page 4

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  1. #91
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    I had to get this one for class. It's a good one. Oil Painting Secrets From A Master by Linda Cateura and David Leffel

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  3. #92
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    More good education.

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    Learning to see

    "...the ideas are what matter most" Doug Chiang
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  4. #93
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    I was wondering if anybody here knew a good reference book about insects, I'm not aware of any myself even though I would love to study drawing them.

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  5. #94
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    I would like to mention Jack Hamm's "Drawing Scenery: Landscapes and Seascapes".
    I didn't find the title grabbing at all but after JeffX repeated mentions of it, I bought it and am currently working my way through it.
    For a beginner I think this is awesome indeed.

    The Artist's Reading List

    The entire book is based on pencil as a medium and only few pages deal with types of paper- no fancy schmancy about tools, you can just start working with sheet and paper.
    I especially recommend visiting http://www.wikipaintings.org/ while reading the book, because certain tasks in the book are to look at master paintings and try to find the point of entry and follow-through in the composition.

    In comparison to various books on landscapes and composition, I found this the most straight-forward and best suited for a beginner.

    (thanks JeffX)

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  7. #95
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    obrigado for the links.

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  8. #96
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    I have a lot of books about film-making, this is also kind of art. I plan to buying some good drawing book.

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  9. #97
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    What about ''Discovering Oil Painting'' by George Cherepov? http://www.google.gr/imgres?q=cherep...,r:13,s:0,i:90

    Has anyone ever seen what's inside?

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  10. #98
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    Wich of these ones is the best for a starter? I want to learn figure drawing, but i don't understand how bridgman works..

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  11. #99
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    For information on traditional painting and working the materials used, I'm using The Artist's Handbook by Ray Smith and I'm blown away by how much information there is on mediums like Gouache, watercolour, oils, acrylics, pastels, etc. I'm looking at the first edition and I know that older books generally tend to be written more thoroughly so I don't know how much they've changed in the third edition, but definitely worth a look if you're looking at molecular mediums.



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  12. #100
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    Just picked up Ken Hultgren's book online. For under $5, it was a no brainier. Covers: Horses, Deer, Cats, Cows, Bulls, Giraffes, Camels, Gorillas, Pigs, Dogs, Foxes, Kangaroos, Rabbits, Squirrels, Elephants, and Bears. Ken breaks the animals down to simple forms and builds them up.
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  13. #101
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    Godly thread. Tracking this.

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  14. #102
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    I desperately want to become a concept artist, despite only having started taking wanting to learn art seriously at 18 and now 20 still grappling around with the basics of drawing and currently only traditional media before i get more towards the later fundamentals/how to do full characters/environments/etc.

    (now despite my rather unorganized an frivolous attempts to study all this time, lets just pretend i'm going from scratch)
    Many people have stated the very first thing to be focused on is drawing from life (which apparently even applies to people who wish to become solely focused on a certain style and not photorealism humans/style, me personally wanting to learn fictional concept art), but i will have basically no opportunity to draw people from life, plenty of objects/places/things/etc but no opportunity for people.

    Despite this, once i've done quite an amount of drawing from life/observation of objects/places/things/etc i will eventually reach the stage of needing to learn figure/anatomy.
    I have been studying "Figure drawing, design and invention" by michael hampton but apparently it turns out that it's geared more for experienced artists,
    So i have recieved suggestions for two different things in terms of figure/anatomy books as a beginner before i move on in my learning process towards learning concept art.

    1) Andrew Loomis's "Figure drawing for all it's worth" + and it was suggested i buy "the Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist" as technical book, whatever that means, to go with the andrew loomis book.
    2) Drawing on the right side of the brain.

    Which one would be best for me?

    "I have offended God and mankind because my work didn't reach the quality it should have." - Leonardo da Vinci
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  15. #103
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    Maybe you need to show some of your drawing instead of this. I started at the same age as you and had some of same time management skill issues as you, but its shouldn't matter anymore, because its in the past. And a lot of famous artists that you know of started late. There is a comic artist named Rivkah who started drawing in her mid 20's. Google her and look at her stuff.

    Last edited by karta tajba; February 12th, 2014 at 02:31 PM.
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  17. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Subhumanfailure View Post
    I desperately want to become a concept artist, despite only having started taking wanting to learn art seriously at 18 and now 20 still grappling around with the basics of drawing and currently only traditional media before i get more towards the later fundamentals/how to do full characters/environments/etc.

    (now despite my rather unorganized an frivolous attempts to study all this time, lets just pretend i'm going from scratch)
    Many people have stated the very first thing to be focused on is drawing from life (which apparently even applies to people who wish to become solely focused on a certain style and not photorealism humans/style, me personally wanting to learn fictional concept art), but i will have basically no opportunity to draw people from life, plenty of objects/places/things/etc but no opportunity for people.

    Despite this, once i've done quite an amount of drawing from life/observation of objects/places/things/etc i will eventually reach the stage of needing to learn figure/anatomy.
    I have been studying "Figure drawing, design and invention" by michael hampton but apparently it turns out that it's geared more for experienced artists,
    So i have recieved suggestions for two different things in terms of figure/anatomy books as a beginner before i move on in my learning process towards learning concept art.

    1) Andrew Loomis's "Figure drawing for all it's worth" + and it was suggested i buy "the Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist" as technical book, whatever that means, to go with the andrew loomis book.
    2) Drawing on the right side of the brain.

    Which one would be best for me?
    Buy the Loomis books. Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is only useful for the complete and utter beginner, and half the text is questionable (although the exercises can be useful). If you are really curious about it, it can be found in nearly any library where you do not have to spend money on it.

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  19. #105
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    Strategic Intuition by Bill Duggan. It is a beauty...about learning to create more aha moments that change your life and career and work for the better. One of the best I have ever read...

    LEVEL UP! - ConceptArt.Org online workshops are on sale- Join now and get 25% off!
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  21. #106
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    reading a cool book my teacher told me about 'elements of drawing' by john ruskin :-)

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  22. #107
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    http://www.amazon.com/Drawing-Ideas-.../dp/0385344627

    This seem to be more for people who are studying Product Design or graphic design. But its good because they show you examples of what a render drawing looks like and etc.




    http://www.amazon.com/How-Draw-sketc...715074-4898802


    Good for people who need to work on structure and form, and line quality and perspective. Its very technical though.

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  23. #108
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    good thread, thanks for sharing everybody. I know a number of these from the list I got from my teachers. Some on here I have to check out for sure :-)

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  24. #109
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    I hope it's still OK to post here, but I just rediscovered a book I got ages ago and had completely forgotten about. "Strength Training Anatomy" by Frederic Delavier (http://www.amazon.com/Strength-Train...aining+anatomy , This is the version I have, but I believe there is also a 3rd edition now).

    This, as you can probably tell from the title, is a strength training book rather than an art book. The diagrams however are the useful part, there are the usual muscle diagrams, but also diagrams showing which muscles are used in different exercises/movements. So you can see how muscles will react and expand/contract with different movements.

    I'm not sure if this will be useful to others, but personally I've found it invaluable

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