Sticky Acrylic Paint
 
View testimonialsView Artwork
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    747
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 80 Times in 77 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Sticky Acrylic Paint

    I noticed that acrylic paint stays sort of sticky even months after it dries. Is there any way to make it completely dry, either while or after painting?

    Also, which dries acrylic faster-- hot or cold air?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,679 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Questions:
    What brand of paint are you using?
    Are you adding anything besides water to the paint?
    Is the pant layer soft and sticky?

    Answer:
    Hot air, of course.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    747
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 80 Times in 77 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm using Craft Smart, Liquitex Basics, and Amsterdam. I've found that the more professional brands tend to be thicker. I usually don't add anything to it, but I think the paint that was mixed with water is a bit less sticky when it dries. The dried paint is a little soft, yeah. I can make a mark with my fingernail that quickly heals.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,679 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Those are all student grade paints, which tend to be underpigmented. Using artist's quality paints would solve a lot of the problem (more "bricks," less "mortar."). As long as the paint isn't gummy and doesn't redissolve in water it should be fine. A coat of matte varnish or medium should cut down on the surface tackiness, at the cost of some gloss.

    Last edited by Elwell; February 9th, 2009 at 12:07 PM.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    645
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 54 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I don’t know about the painting conditions you are working in eminkey2003 or maybe that you are applying the paint very thickly but I myself use Liquitex and most of the time it is dry in 15 minutes. So I’m not sure what is causing this problem for you.

    Bruce

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,134
    Thanks
    8,227
    Thanked 5,582 Times in 1,786 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I think what you're questioning isn't a "drying" problem as much as it is a natural tendency for many plastics to be "sticky" or "soft" to the touch. The copolymers used in painting don't become "hard" the way an oil painting or varnish does, especially in heavy straight applications, but have a through-and-through softness that is normal to the medium. That's why your fingernail mark pops back out to some degree, and why you can make a mark in the first place. This causes problems with dirt and nicotine/smoke in the air collecting on the paint surface faster than with varnished pieces and oils. It also causes MAJOR problem if acrylic paintings are stored face to face, or pushed up against each other front to back. NEVER stack paintings on canvas panels on top of each other--the weight of the pile will make them stick together enough to damage them when you try to separate them.

    This isn't as big a problem when additives (sand, glass beads, dirt, etc.) are added to increase the texture/thickness of the paint since it breaks up the slick uniform surface.

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Ilaekae For This Useful Post:


  9. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    3,234
    Thanks
    860
    Thanked 847 Times in 457 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I have this exact same problem, with paint from a frame sticking to the surface of a painting after storage and ruining the edges of the painting. Of course now the frame is also chipped from the loss of paint. I'm thinking of storing them between layers of waxed paper next time. The same goes either with matte or gloss varnish...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Qitsune For This Useful Post:


  11. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,134
    Thanks
    8,227
    Thanked 5,582 Times in 1,786 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Qitsune, the wax paper works beautifully, especially if you cut strips and fold them down a couple of times longwise to form a sort of narrow cushion. It keeps one high point of the canvas from jamming into the frame to some degree.

    Wax paper IS moisture sensitive, so another way is to cut long strips of thin translucent polyethelene drop cloth material into long strips about an inch wide and tack them on the outer edges of the painting so that about an 1/8" (or what ever's appropriate for your frame) or so hangs over the front edge. It takes a little practice, but you can fold this edge over so it comes between the frame lip and the painting front. It will sit tightly, but won't stick. POLY does NOT stick to anything...even glues.

    If you're really good with tight spaces, you can actually tack the strips of poly to the INSIDE of the frame sides so a bit hangs over to the front when the painting is inserted.

    I did something a bit strange back in the sixties with a couple of my paintings in wooden frames--I tapped in tiny tacks with :high" rounded heads about every 8" to a foot or so at the extreme face edge of the paintings. Not hard enough to leave more than a pinhole, but solidly enough to form an "air-break" of space about 1/32" all around the painting edge. DON'T get paint on these tacks or they'll stick to the wooden frame.

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Ilaekae For This Useful Post:


Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook