To Electric Eraser users: how valuable is it to you?
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,125
    Thanks
    451
    Thanked 204 Times in 130 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Icon To Electric Eraser users: how valuable is it to you?

    I'm about to buy a cheap one because I heard it can be useful in drawing, though nobody went into specifics.

    But more importantly, I'm making this thread because I have a team graphic design project where we have to market an electric eraser, and are thinking about targeting illustrators/fine artists as opposed to the draftsmen these things are usually associated with.


    I was wondering if I could get some testimonials as to the usefulness of this product to you or other people you know who use one. (We're specifically doing the small Staedtler battery-operated one, for its portability and low cost, but if you don't have that particular one, it's OK).

    I saw it's a good tool for comics artists, so I'm guessing this could apply to other art involving graphite... How well? Can you render well with it, or is it only good for cleaning up unwanted lines?

    Do you think electric erasers are underrated? Should more artists know about and use them?

    Thanks!

    Last edited by Zirngibism; February 5th, 2009 at 04:50 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    2,035
    Thanks
    895
    Thanked 850 Times in 290 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I have that Staedtler eraser and love it. I certainly don't use it every day but using blue-line pencil a lot, even Col-Erase is really difficult to erase by hand but you can lift a lot more of it with a powered eraser. The powered eraser can lift up a lot of even a waxy pencil like a Prisma.

    Really I use it a lot more for the heavy lifting, getting back to white of the paper, than for rendering at all (occasional highlight is really the only rendering I do with it). It's nice for drawing lighter into a lot of graphite, things like spiderwebs or rigging. I use a kneaded eraser for rendering, the Staedtler really just lifts way too much for getting convincing form.

    In a shared studio though, there's nothing better for annoying your coworkers

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to nonie For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    113
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I have used it for CAD design, for electrical plans. (I used to study mechanical engineering).

    It's quite handy on thin CAD plotted cad paper because you don't tear your paper up so easily because the electrical erasors are sensitive (well the good ones are).

    But specific for arts? Hm, I'm using a kneeded and standard eraser now. I guess for vector art or very precise art you could use it. The advantage of not tearing up very thin papers would still apply.

    I think they're overrated a bit. They do have their advantages for CAD design and electrical plans / building plans / architecture.
    You could classify architecture design under arts in a way.

    But for traditional arts, to me at least, they offer very little benefits over a regular eraser.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Jem'ennuie For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    HunterKiller_'s Avatar
    HunterKiller_ is offline Registered User Level 15 Gladiator: Spartacus' Hoplomachi
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    3,763
    Thanks
    2,126
    Thanked 1,004 Times in 654 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It's very useful as a 'white pencil'.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,181
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 198 Times in 116 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Is it good for delicate paper?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Outside Toronto
    Posts
    542
    Thanks
    276
    Thanked 349 Times in 125 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I like my little battery-powered Sakura - with the small eraser I can do finer clean up than with traditional rubs.

    My plug-in is a joy to work with whether I'm pencilling ot inking. I like cutting into it with an X-acto when I need razor sharp cleaning and a shield isn't fine enough. The high-grit ink eraser is great when working on bristol board since I can grind off the ink and still have a decent surface to re-ink over.

    ~R

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to rpace For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 22 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    We're using electric erasers in school for correcting ink drawings (bugs etc.). As rpace already said, the good part is that you can ink over the erased parts of the paper without quality loss, but it depends very much on the paper you're using. I've only used some schoellerhammer airbrush paper so far, but there are other suitable papers on the market, sorry can't remember them atm.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #8
    CesarNostradamus's Avatar
    CesarNostradamus is offline Banned for grossly unprofessional behavior. Level 5 Gladiator: Myrmillo
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Canada. Alberta
    Posts
    338
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 23 Times in 21 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Fucking Technology. Fuck paper. Ill draw in my mind.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #9
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CesarNostradamus View Post
    Fucking Technology. Fuck paper. Ill draw in my mind.
    How about you just post in your mind too?


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  14. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    113
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CesarNostradamus View Post
    Fucking Technology. Fuck paper. Ill draw in my mind.
    haha

    I'm going to look up how they make normal erasers now.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,125
    Thanks
    451
    Thanked 204 Times in 130 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks so much for all of your replies! Having a mix of both positive and somewhat negative is very helpful for us to figure our how to structure our ads and what about our product to emphasize.

    Mine's coming in a few days so I'll see how well (or not so well) that particular type works.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    699
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 173 Times in 120 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Okay, this might sound crazy, but... what is an electric eraser? (I mean, I assume it is an eraser which is powered somehow, but beyond that.) O_o I have never heard of such a thing before. Where do you even find such a thing?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    113
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by FlameRaven View Post
    Okay, this might sound crazy, but... what is an electric eraser? (I mean, I assume it is an eraser which is powered somehow, but beyond that.) O_o I have never heard of such a thing before. Where do you even find such a thing?
    It's like a small drill like thingy that turns around the gum piece you put in it. You fill it just like you fill a filling pencil. Some work on bateries, some on the outlet.
    You can refill the gum. The little engine inside it just spins the gum around.

    I got mine from a utility store. I don't know if you even call it that in the US, but the store where you would normally find technical craftsmen material, like measuring tapes, drills, sandpaper..those kinda stores. Art shops might have them too, but the one I go to never has them.

    Last edited by Jem'ennuie; February 6th, 2009 at 06:37 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Outside Toronto
    Posts
    542
    Thanks
    276
    Thanked 349 Times in 125 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Info and pictures here.

    I bought mine at art supply shops.

    ~R

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •